Seattle Seahawks

Minnesota will reveal who the Seahawks really are

Minnesota will reveal who the Seahawks really are

Yes, it's only a preseason game. 

No, we shouldn't make too much out of what happens tonight when Seattle plays at Minnesota (kick off is 5 p.m.). 

For kicks, though, let's pretend for a moment that the Seahawks (0-2 preseason) could very well transform the offensive line into a viable group, generate a strong running game and find some gems on defense to contend in the NFC. 

For that to be considered remotely viable, we should see some evidence tonight. Seattle is facing by far the toughest team on its preseason schedule in the Vikings (1-1), went 13-3 to reach the NFC Championship mostly on the strength of the league's top-ranked defense (15.8 points per game allowed). 

Seattle's offense thus far has been solid. The first group moved the ball 75 yards on 12 plays to score a touchdown against Indianapolis in the preseason opener before leaving the game. Last week, the first-team offense drove the ball virtually at will (Russell Wilson passed for 193 yards) in the first half but failed to close out a few deep drives with touchdowns. The Vikings' defense allowed just 23 touchdowns all of last season and gave up just 83.6 rushing yards per game. 

“(Minnesota has a) really good run defense," Seattle offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer said. "They’re going to have a heavy box, but we want to see us run the ball really well."

Minnesota is all about disrupting the run and forcing negative plays. Sometimes simply getting three yards on a rushing play against the Vikings is a major victory because it's better than losing yards. They allowed just 3.7 yards per carry last season. 

[RELATED: For Seahawks, "the comp is on" at right tackle.]

"They’re going to have some negative plays that they create but we expect that we’re going to churn out some good yards as well," Schottenheimer said. "Again, run-pass balance depends on a lot of things. It depends on – you stay ahead of the sticks by throwing completions. Do you shoot yourselves in the foot with some penalties? But we’d like to see us run the football well against these guys and mix up the type of runs that we have, not just be a wide zone team. You’ll see us attacking with some different run types.”

Seattle coach Pete Carroll said that the starters would play into the third quarter to get the feel of going in at halftime, making adjustments and then implementing those changes in the second half. In the end, closing drives with touchdowns rather than repeatedly settling for field goals will spell success. 

"We've got to get down and get in the end zone, that's real clear," Carroll said. "We're kicking the ball fine but that's not what we want to do down there."

Note: Right guard D.J. Fluker will play tonight, according to Carroll. He dislocated a finger last week against the Los Angeles Chargers. "We'll see how long he lasts. He just wants to play so bad, he's playing. A lot of guys wouldn't play...He'll get some play time. We'll see how much."... Cornerback Byron Maxwell remains out with a groin injury. 

Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Secondary depth and a nickel corner are needed

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Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Secondary depth and a nickel corner are needed

Part 6 in an eight-part series that takes a position-by-position look at the Seattle Seahawks' needs heading into the NFL Draft on April 25-27. 

Past posts: QuarterbacksRunning backsOffensive lineWide receiver; Tight end

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Today: Defensive backs. 

Depth Chart: Cornerbacks: Shaquill Griffin, Tre Flowers, Akeem King, Jeremy Boykins, Neiko Thorpe. Safeties: Bradley McDougald, Tedric Thompson, Delano Hall, Shalom Luani.

Need: Medium. 

Expectations: Seattle likes its starters but could use a nickel corner and a backup safety. 

Potential targets: Ashley Young provides a list of potential draft targets at safety and cornerback

Picks: After trading defensive end Frank Clark to Kansas City for a first-round pick this year, a second-round pick in 2020 and a swap of third-round picks this year, the Seahawks now have five picks in the draft: first round (No. 21, No. 29), third round (No. 92), fourth round (No. 124) and fifth round (No. 159).

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The Legion of Boom has officially been completely wiped away with the departure of safety Earl Thomas, who signed with Baltimore, although the injured Kam Chancellor remains on the roster. 

Such a reality, however, didn't spell doom for Seattle's secodary thanks to the rapid growth of Griffin, Thompson and Flowers, to go along with the quality veteran acquisition of McDougald.

Seattle coach Pete Carroll loves coaching the secondary and covets big cornerbacks. So the rapid development of Flowers, a 6-foot-3 rookie selected with a fifth-round pick last year, has put the Seahawks in a firm situation at the starting corner positions.

"Expectations are high," Carroll told reporters regarding Flowers during the league meetings last month. "We’re not going to count on him being the same, we want him to be better, and hopefully draw on the strengths that he has, because he’s got obvious strengths in his size and his tackling ability and the physical side of it. His ability to knock the ball out and force fumbles really stood out last year, it’s something we really cherish about his play, I think he can get quite a bit better there too."

Maybe the only true hole is the nickel corner position. Justin Coleman signed with Detroit during free agency but the Seahawks return the 215-pound King, who played in dime packages, and signed Boykins during the offseason. While both have potential, neither is a guaranteed impact performer. 

That reality could lead Seattle to select a cornerback in this draft to add to the mix. A backup safety that could become a future starter could also be needed. 

Seattle has selected a defensive back in all but one draft (2016) since Carroll and general manager John Schneider took over in 2010. 

Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Selecting a tight end appears unlikely

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Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Selecting a tight end appears unlikely

Part 5 in an eight-part series that takes a position-by-position look at the Seattle Seahawks' needs heading into the NFL Draft on April 25-27. 

Past posts: QuarterbacksRunning backs; Offensive line; Wide receiver.

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Today: Tight end. 

Depth Chart: Ed Dickson, Will Dissly, Nick Vannett, Tyrone Swoops. 

Need: Low to medium. 

Expectations: Seattle could maybe use an elite receiving tight end but unless a gem too good to pass up is available to them in the middle to late rounds, Seattle likely won't select one.  

Potential targets: Ashley Young provides a list of potential draft targets at tight end. 

Picks: After trading defensive end Frank Clark to Kansas City for a first-round pick this year, a second-round pick in 2020 and a swap of third-round picks this year, the Seahawks now have five picks in the draft: first round (No. 21, No. 29), third round (No. 92), fourth round (No. 124) and fifth round (No. 159).

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Seattle couldn't have been happier with rookie tight end Will Dissly last season through three games last season. The fourth-round pick out of Washington. He blocked as well as the team had expected while also emerging as a legitimate threat in the passing game. 

Then all of the good feels came to a halt Week 4 when he suffered a season-ending knee injury. He is expected to be back in the lineup this season but Dissly, who ruptured his patellar tendon, might not be 100 percent once the season begins. 

“It’s still going to take us all the way to camp time to get him going, and we won’t rush that, at all,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll told reporters during the league meetings last month.

On one hand, Seattle remains in good hands at tight end with Dickson, who returned from an injury of his own in about the middle of the season and played well the rest of the way. Vannett is certainly a capable backup. But not being sure as to what Dissly will bring to the team early in the season could lead Seattle to select a tight end in the draft if one is on the board that the team simply can't resist. 

None of the top three tight ends on the team are dynamic receivers, but they are capable. Adding an elite receiving tight end would be nice. But would it be worth burning a draft pick given that the team likes its top three tight ends? That's the question that will be answered likely on day three of the draft. 

BREAKING: Seahawks DE Frank Clark traded to Kansas City

BREAKING: Seahawks DE Frank Clark traded to Kansas City

Frank Clark gets his long-term deal. 

According to Adam Schefter of ESPN, the Seattle Seahawks have reportedly traded Clark to the Kansas City Chiefs in exchange for a 2019 first-round pick, a 2020 second-round pick and an exchange of third round picks. 

Clark reached a five-year year deal worth $105.5 million with $63.5 million guaranteed, per Ian Rapoport of the NFL Network

Seattle will now have the 21st and 29th picks in the 2019 NFL Draft on Thursday, as well as second rounder for next year. 

Clark, who has spent the last four seasons with the Seahawks, is coming off his best year in Seattle. The soon-to-be 26-year-old defensive end recorded 13 sacks in 2018, starting 16 regular season games. He also had 41 tackles, three forced fumbles, two fumble recoverings and 10 tackles for loss last season. 

More analysis to come from our Seahawks Insider Aaron Fentress. 

Seattle Seahawks QB Russell Wilson thanks offensive lineman with Amazon stock

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Seattle Seahawks QB Russell Wilson thanks offensive lineman with Amazon stock

Russell Wilson is just days removed from signing his lofty four-year, $140 million contract extension, but he’s wasting no time getting primed for a new season.

To show thanks to his offensive line, the Seattle Seahawks quarterback gifted his 13 offensive lineman with $12,000 worth of Amazon stock, according to TMZ Sports.

"Every Sunday we go to battle together,” Wilson wrote in a letter to his teammates. “You sacrifice your physical and mental well-being to protect me, which in turn allows me to provide and care for my family.

"This does not go unnoticed and it is never forgotten."

In the letter, Wilson said he wants to help his teammates prepare for life after football and he believes the Amazon stock will not only have an impact on the lives of the players, but their family and children as well.

"When I sat down to think of ways to honor your dedication a dozen different ideas came to mind. Some were flashy, some were cool, but I wanted to give you something that had a lasting impact.

"You have invested in my life ... this is my investment into yours."

The 13 gifts cost Wilson approximately $156,000. We’ll have to wait to see if Wilson’s generous gifts pay off when the Seahawks regular season kicks off on Sept. 8.

Seattle Seahawks prep for draft, ponder potential trades and DE Frank Clark

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Seattle Seahawks prep for draft, ponder potential trades and DE Frank Clark

Seattle general manager John Schneider said today during press conference along with coach Pete Carroll that the team's draft board remains fluid with the NFL Draft set to being Thursday and run through Sunday.

Maybe that's because the team doesn't quite know what to do with itself while having just four picks to work with. 

"Well, it’s not fun," Schneider he told reporters. "But we’ve built our team all the way through the year and that’s just part of the process."

Seattle traded its sixth-round pick for backup quarterback Brett Hundley (now in Arizona), it's seventh-round pick for backup safety Shalom Luani, and the second-round pick in the 2017 deal that landed left tackle Duane Brown.

That leaves Seattle with a pick in the first (21), third (No. 84), fourth (No. 124) and fifth (No. 159).

That's downright painful for a duo that entering its 10th draft together has never had fewer than eight picks (2015) and has averaged 9.6 per draft.

On the surface that means Seattle is likely to look to trade back to acquire draft picks. Or, could the Seahawks deal defensive end Frank Clark?

Clark, just 25, had 13 sacks last season and has emerged as one of the best edge pass rushers in the game. So much so that Seattle slapped him with the franchise tag this offseason to prevent the unrestricted free agent from getting away. Seattle is schedule to pay Clark $17.1 million this season but he has reportedly made it clear that he will not report to camp without a long-term deal in place. Such a deal could cost Seattle $18 million per season. That could prove to be too rich for a franchise that just signed its quarterback, Russell Wilson, to a four-year extension worth $35 million per season. 

According to NFL Network, Seattle has received interest from Indianapolis, the New York Jets and Kansas City regarding Clark. 

Clark could net multiple draft picks and save the team a boat load of salary cap space. 

"We wouldn’t be doing our jobs if we weren’t listening to everybody," Schneider said of a possible deal involving Clark. "So I get it. It’s, you know, people need to be speculating on things at this time of the year."

But that doesn't mean Clark is even on the block. Schneider said it's feasible to keep Clark, middle linebacker Bobby Wagner (one year remaining on his deal), defensive tackle Jarran Reed (one year remaining) and Clark. But ti won't be easy. 

"Were you in my bedroom last night when I woke up in the middle of the night?" Schneider asked a reporter. "No, I think about it all the time."

It's almost safe to bet the farm that Seattle will make some type of deal before or during the draft. Schneider recognizes that the team has a reputation for being willing to move back to acquire picks. 

"This year is unique for us having four picks," he said. "Rookie free agency is going to be huge for us...But our guys do a great job of calling everybody and trying to get scenarios all set up and where can we go? They’re trying to figure out where we can go and move back to. So, I think the fact that we have done it a lot kind of invites people a little bit."

Seattle Seahawks could make a move to trade Frank Clark before NFL Draft

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Seattle Seahawks could make a move to trade Frank Clark before NFL Draft

With the 2019 NFL Draft right around the corner, rumors around the league are heating up and the Seattle Seahawks are right in the mix.

Considering Seahawks general manager John Schneider’s willingness to field trade offers for defensive end Frank Clark, it’s worth considering a drastic possibility on the table: the Seahawks could trade Clark before Thursday’s draft.

Clark, who was taken 63rd overall in the 2015 NFL Draft, has been a part of trade rumors since the pass-rusher vowed not to sign his $17.128 million franchise tag until a long-term deal is done.

The Seahawks are said to want at least a first-round pick as part of a package deal for Clark, according to ESPN’s Adam Schefter. The Indianapolis Colts, Kansas City Chiefs and New York Jets have emerged as suitors for Clark, per Ian Rapoport of NFL Network.

When asked Monday if it would be viable to keep Clark, as well as linebacker Bobby Wagner and defensive tackle Jarran Reed, who are heading into the final seasons of their contracts, Schneider seemed reluctant.

“Feasible, very challenging,” Schneider responded when asked about the trio.

Clark is coming off his best season in a Seahawks uniform. The 25-year-old pass-rusher has 13 sacks in 2018, starting all 16 regular season games. He added 41 tackles, three forced fumbles, two fumble recovers and 10 tackles for loss last year.

He has emerged as a rising star for Seattle over the past few years, but with a plethora of defensive ends in this year’s draft, the Seahawks could very well select a talented pass-rusher who can be groomed to fit Seattle’s needs. 

The Seahawks currently hold four picks in the 2019 draft, which begins Thursday in Nashville, Tennessee. They have the No. 21 overall pick on Thursday and no picks in the second round. 

Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Wide receiver is a definite need

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Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Wide receiver is a definite need

Part 4 in an eight-part series that takes a position-by-position look at the Seattle Seahawks' needs heading into the NFL Draft on April 25-27. 

Past posts: QuarterbackRunning backOffensive line

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Today: Wide receiver

Depth Chart: Tyler Lockett and Doug Baldwin are the starters. The primary backups are David Moore and Jaron Brown. 

Need: Red alert. Huge need. 

Expectations: Seattle must draft a receiver capable of contributing right away in 2019.

Potential targets: Ashley Young provides a list of potential draft targets at wide receiver. 

Picks: The Seahawks have four picks in round one (No. 21), round three (No. 84), round four (No. 124) and round five (No. 159).

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Seattle general manager John Schneider last month attempted to downplay the team's need at wide receiver while appearing on a Seattle-are radio show shortly after it was revealed that Baldwin had already undergone numerous surgeries and was scheduled for a hernia procedure. 

It's difficult to buy Schneider's logic. Seattle certainly has a legit top target in Lockett and Moore is a very promising prospect as the current No. 3 receiver. Brown, caught just 14 passes last season but proved valuable in the red zone with five touchdown receptions. 

Then there's Baldwin. He battled injuries all of last season and had the second least productive year of his career with 50 receptions for 618 yards and four touchdowns in 13 starts. When firing on all cylinders, Baldwin, 30, proved to still be a major playmaker. He scored five touchdowns over the team's final six regular season games highlighted by a 126-yard, one-touchdown performance in a win over Kansas City. 

But Baldwin is banged up. On top of that, he has two years remaining on his contract that will pay him $9.25 million this season and $10.25 million next season. It doesn't make sense for Seattle to cut him loose this season because Baldwin has a dead cap figure of $6.287 million. Releasing him would save only about $3 million. Next year, however, Baldwin's dead cap figure will be $3.1 million, so releasing him would save the team $7 million.

No matter what happens next year, or this year, Seattle could certainly use another target for quarterback Russell Wilson to work with. That man might not be taken in the first round, but expect the Seahawks to come away from this draft with a young receiver that they expect to not only make the team but contribute right away. 

Seattle did not draft a receiver last year. It took Moore in the seventh round of the 2017 NFL Draft. That same year, the Seahawks used a third-round pick on Amara Darboh out of Michigan. He played sparingly as a rookie and doesn't figure into Seattle's future plans. 

Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Is another young offensive lineman is needed?

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Seattle Seahawks Draft Preview - Is another young offensive lineman is needed?

Part 3 in an eight-part series that takes a position-by-position look at the Seattle Seahawks' needs heading into the NFL Draft on April 25-27. 

Past posts: Quarterbacks; Running backs

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Today: Offensive line. 

Depth Chart: LT: Duane Brown, George Fant; LG: Mike Iupati, Ethan Pocic; Center: Justin Britt, Joey Hunt,; RG: D.J. Fluker, Jordan Simmons; RT: Germain Ifedi, George Fant, Jamarco Jones. 

Need: Medium. 

Expectations: Seattle will likely add a young offensive lineman to the mix if it acquires additional picks via trace. 

Potential targets: Ashley Young provides a list of potential draft targets at offensive line.   

Picks: The Seahawks have four picks in round one (No. 21), round three (No. 84), round four (No. 124) and round five (No. 159).

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The top story of 2018 for Seattle was the play of the offensive line under new position coach Mike Solari. Seattle went from having one of NFL's most mediocre lines and run games in 2017 to trotting out the leading rushing attack in all the land last season.  

So why on earth would the team need more young offensive lineman? Well, the Seahawks probably don't need anyone for for 2019 but it wouldn't hurt to add a young talent along the line to develop for the future. 

Brown is 33 and Iupati is about to turn 32. Fluker is just 28 but is on a two-year deal. There are plenty of young offensive lineman on the roster making acquiring one not a major need. Ifedi, a first-round pick in 2016, is about to turn 25. Pocic, a second-round pick in 2017, is just 23. Fant is 26. Simmons, who filled in amazingly for Fluker last season when he missed a couple of games, is only 24. 

That all said, Seattle, under general manager John Schneider and coach Pete Carroll, has selected an offensive linemen in every draft since 2011 except for the 2012 draft. The Seahawks chose tackle Jamarco Jones in the fifth round last year. 

It certainly would be unusual for Seattle not to select at least one lineman this week. So while this isn't a great area of need and there are plenty of young bodies already in place, expect Seattle to add another to the group. The only reason they wouldn't is if the Seahawks remain with only the four selections. But who truly believes that will be the case?

Could Seattle Seahawks' QB Russell Wilson have Tom Brady-like longevity?

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Could Seattle Seahawks' QB Russell Wilson have Tom Brady-like longevity?

During Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson's press conference to discuss his new four-year, $140 million contract extension, he talked about his career, his family, his love for Seattle, and everything else that went into his desire to remain right where he is. 

"When it came down to it, it was a no-brainer for me to want to be in Seattle and I want to be a Seahawk for life," Wilson told reporters. "That was kind of my mentality."

Maybe the most interesting thing Wilson said was in regard to longevity. Wilson said he has spent time over the years talking to Tom Brady and Drew Brees about the art of playing quarterback. Brady, 41, just won his sixth Super Bowl with New England, and Brees, 40, just led New Orleans to the NFC Championship game. 

Wilson, 30, said he sees himself doing similar things when he reaches their respective ages. 

"Just turning 30, I feel like I am just beginning," Wilson said. "So hopefully I can play here for another 10, 15 years.”

Wilson still playing quarterback at the age of 45 seems like a stretch but reaching 40 and still being in the league is certainly in the cards. He, of course, needs to avoid any major injuries and it could be possible. Brees and Brady have each had some injury issues during their careers but nothing that irreparably wrecked their bodies, unlike Peyton Manning, who went through a severe neck injury. Manning came back from that and played well for a few years before he simply couldn't throw the ball like he used to.  

Wilson has not only yet to suffer a major injury he hasn't missed a single game in seven seasons, a remarkable fact. He is very deft at evading pressure and is smart about sliding or gliding out of bounds to avoid taking unnecessary hits. Seattle has mostly done a good ob of using a strong running game and not exposing Wilson to needless punishment with empty offensive sets and long-developing plays that expose him to pounding by pass rushers. 

But, eventually, the odds are that Wilson will miss some time due to injury. The hope simply must be that any injury would no have lingering impacts compounded by aging. 

One thing that quarterbacks who plays a long time have in common is intellect. The play the game at an elite level form the neck up. Wilson certainly falls into that category.  He is as smart as they come. He's also, so far, been as durable as they come. 

Those two traits add up to Wilson being around well into the next decade.