Seattle Seahawks

NFL teams preparing for virtual, at-home Draft, will remain must-see TV

NFL teams preparing for virtual, at-home Draft, will remain must-see TV

While the COVID-19 pandemic has forced multiple stay-at-home orders nationwide, putting on the NFL Draft with the usual fanfare was not an option this season without delaying it heavily.

Additionally, given that the NFL wants to begin their season on time, postponing the NFL Draft was also not in the cards, but now we have more of an idea of what the event will look like.

According to ESPN's Adam Schefter, multiple NFL teams are preparing for the upcoming 2020 NFL Draft to be held entirely online and done from their homes virtually. 

So while the draft prospects may not be in college this semester, they will still need to utilize zoom like everyone else their age. This time, it'll be supplementing the largest moment of their lives up to this point. It should still be special and surely they will still get a call from the general manager before the pick gets announced on television. 

Also, given the news of an all-online NFL Draft let social media run wild.

This year, the NFL will be pushed to the brink in how to get creative, to turn one of their biggest events of the year into compelling TV. In part, the mystery behind how they're going to pull this off will be reason enough to watch. 

Virtual war rooms, live look-ins and overall logistics once a players' name is called will be fascinating. 

Will it have the pomp and circumstance of the Las Vegas Strip? No.

But, it will still be interesting to see how it's presented and how they'll pull it off.

And let's be honest, at this point, the country will take any taste of sports it can get. 

Seahawks cancel team meetings as George Floyd’s memorial takes place

Seahawks cancel team meetings as George Floyd’s memorial takes place

The Seattle Seahawks will not hold virtual meetings on Thursday, June 4, as a memorial service to honor George Floyd is underway in Minneapolis, according to Jeremy Fowler of ESPN. 

Floyd died on May 25 after white police officer Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes. Charges were elevated for Chauvin, from third-to-second degree murder on Wednesday. Three other officers were charged with aiding and abetting murder.  

Three memorials over six days are planned in cities where Floyd born, grew up and died. 

Russell Wilson, Duane Brown, DK Metcalf, Bobby Wagner and Tyler Lockett are among several Seahawks who have spoken out about Floyd’s tragic death, as well as racial injustice and police brutality in America. 

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll recently made the decision to put offseason training aside to give players an outlet to express their feelings with protests ongoing.

We’ve been here before, and we’ve been through this before from my younger players, the guys that are the rooks coming in, it’s an opportunity for them to hear from our leaders and we have marvelous guys that speak on behalf of the communities, that speak on behalf of their families and on behalf of themselves as teammates, they show the way for younger guys that they can speak and talk in our environment and communicate all in the hopes of finding some kind of sense of understanding and how do we take the next step with this new experience that we just lived through, so horrific as it is again. -- Pete Carroll 

Seattle is just one of many teams allowing players time off to watch the memorial. 

Arizona Cardinals running back Kenyan Drake shared a post on Twitter that the Cardinals are doing the same. 

Several Minnesota Vikings players are attending the memorial in Minneapolis. Vikings virtual meetings are canceled so players who cannot attend the memorial can watch the day's events. 

Steve Raible shares his all-time favorite call as voice of the Seahawks

Steve Raible shares his all-time favorite call as voice of the Seahawks

Steve Raible’s career arc is incredible.

The Seahawks selected him in the second round of the 1976 NFL Draft out of Georgia Tech. Raible, a 6-2 receiver, spent six years playing in Seattle from 1976-81. He caught 68 passes for 1,017 yards and three touchdowns in 84 career games.

In 1982, he was approached by Pete Gross, the original voice of the Seahawks, about joining the broadcast booth as his color guy. Raible accepted, retired from football and immediately hopped into the broadcast booth.

That in and of itself isn’t completely out of the ordinary. Lots of former athletes become TV or radio analysts. Raible had gotten reps with local Seattle radio and TV stations that helped prepare him for the opportunity.

But 22 years later in 2004, Raible made the jump from color to play-by-play, a move seldom (if ever) seen from former athletes. He thrived in the role and remains the current voice of the Seahawks. Including his time as a player, 2020 will be Raible’s 44th year with the organization. Forty four.

Raible was kind enough to share the details of his story as the latest guest on the Talkin’ Seahawks Podcast. During the conversation, Raible discussed how broadcasting legend Verne Lundquist aided his transition to play-by-play, the origin of his famous “holy catfish” call and the pain of losing Super Bowl XL to the Steelers.

He also shared his memories of calling the Seahawks first ever Super Bowl win over the Broncos in January of 2014. The end of that 43-8 beatdown at MetLife Stadium provided Raible with the stage to make his favorite call of his entire career.

With just seconds left on the clock, Raible captured the moment perfectly, saying “12s, bringing the trophy home, your Seahawks are Super Bowl champions.”

“That’s the most fun call I’ve ever had. It wasn’t a play, but it was the exclamation to that night,” Raible said. “That was the moment we could all celebrate and boy we sure did.”

Raible is part of an incredible legacy of Seattle sports broadcasters that includes fellow legends like the late Dave Niehaus, Bob Rondo, Kevin Calabro, Rick Rizzs and others. Hearing him discuss his pride in the Emerald City is something that makes him so endearing to all Seattle natives.

Head here to listen to the full conversation and to catch up on past episodes of the Talkin Seahawks Podcast.

Current, former Seahawks respond to Drew Brees’ comments about the flag

Current, former Seahawks respond to Drew Brees’ comments about the flag

Drew Brees has come under intense criticism since offering his first public comments on Wednesday in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

During the interview with Yahoo! Finance, the New Orleans Saints quarterback mischaracterized the protests of Colin Kaepernick and other NFL players as “disrespecting the flag.”

"I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country,” Brees said. "Let me just tell you what I see or what I feel when the national anthem is played, and when I look at the flag of the United States. I envision my two grandfathers, who fought for this country during World War II, one in the Army and one in the Marine Corp. Both risking their lives to protect our country and to try to make our country and this world a better place."

The star quarterback’s comments drew a sharp rebuke on social media from many of his Saints teammates including Malcolm Jenkins and Demario Davis, who are among leaders of the players coalition seeking social justice and racial equality. 

Brees’ stance startled many current and former Seattle Seahawks players, including outspoken wide receiver Doug Baldwin who called Brees part of the problem. 

Former Legion of Boom enforcer Kam Chancellor responded to a post from a fan that encouraged him to return for one game to “drop the hammer” and light Brees up. 

Chancellor’s response: “That would be a nasty scene.” 

Richard Sherman, who played for the Seahawks from 2011-17 before joining the San Francisco 49ers, called Brees “beyond lost” with his remarks about kneeling in the NFL. 

Seattle wide receiver Tyler Lockett quote tweeted a video regarding how Fox News host Laura Ingraham responded to LeBron James and Kevin Durant’s ‘freedom’ of speech, which blasted President of the United States Donald Trump, and Drew Brees’ comments about taking a knee during the anthem. 

Second-year wide receiver DK Metcalf shared this post following Brees' apology on social media.  

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson has long idolized Brees for paving way for shorter quarterbacks in the NFL. During last year’s Pro Bowl, upon Brees retirement rumors, Wilson gave up his starting spot to the future Hall of Famer.  

When speaking with reporters on Wednesday, Wilson said he hadn’t yet gotten the opportunity to see Brees’ full comments on taking a knee the anthem. He did say, however, that he believes former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was trying to do the right thing. 

I was in meetings. I just got out of meetings. I didn’t get to watch the whole thing. The reality is, Colin was trying to symbolize the oppression that was going on in America, that has been going on for 400 years. And I think people go into a box of, ‘OK, this person is this, and that person is that, because they didn’t do this, or they didn’t do that. The reality is what Colin was trying to do was sit down and do the right thing and try to stand up, figuratively, for what is going on in America. 

It’s heavy on me. ...Colin, for me, he was trying to symbolize the right thing. People may have taken that the wrong way, but he was trying to do the right thing, the bottom line. And he stood up in so many amazing ways to really stand up for black lives and what is going on, and the oppression that is going on. ...I think it is the right thing is that he has been trying to do.

[RELATED: With a heavy heart, Russell Wilson shares poignant thoughts on racism in America]

Brees has issued an apology for his comments. You can read the full statement below. 

View this post on Instagram

I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused. In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character. This is where I stand: I stand with the black community in the fight against systemic racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference. I condemn the years of oppression that have taken place throughout our black communities and still exists today. I acknowledge that we as Americans, including myself, have not done enough to fight for that equality or to truly understand the struggles and plight of the black community. I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the black community in this movement. I will never know what it’s like to be a black man or raise black children in America but I will work every day to put myself in those shoes and fight for what is right. I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening...and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen. For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

Tyler Lockett points out glaring hypocrisy of response to Drew Brees' remarks

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Tyler Lockett points out glaring hypocrisy of response to Drew Brees' remarks

Drew Brees became a trending topic on Twitter Wednesday afternoon after saying he would disapprove of NFL players taking a knee during the national anthem this upcoming season: “I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country.”

The New Orleans Saints quarterback explained when he hears the anthem he thinks of his grandfathers that fought in the military and taking a knee during the song would disrespect the flag. 

Many online found the comments insensitive or ill-informed given the nationwide outcry against systemic racial injustice in this country in response to police brutality, and more specifically the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis Police Custody last month.

That includes Seahawks wide receiver Tyler Lockett, who quote tweeted a video regarding how Fox News host Laura Ingraham responded to LeBron James and Kevin Durant’s ‘freedom’ of speech, which blasted President of the United States Donald Trump, and Drew Brees’ comments about taking a knee during the anthem. 

Here’s a side by side look of Ingraham’s comments: 

On LeBron James and Kevin Durant: “It’s always unwise to seek political advice from someone who makes $100M a year to bounce a ball. Oh, and LeBron, Kevin— you’re great players, but no one voted for you. Millions elected Trump to be their coach. So, keep the political commentary to yourself, or as someone once said, ‘shut up and dribble.’”

On Drew Brees: “Well, he’s allowed to have his view about what kneeling and the flag means to him. He’s a person. He has some worth. This is beyond football. This is totalitarian conduct. This is Stalinist. And by the way, on the streets of New Orleans, they’re shouting ‘F*** Drew Brees.’ That’s what this moment has done to the beautiful team spirit of the New Orleans Saints.”

LeBron James and Kevin Durant are black. Drew Brees is white. 

Both took a stand for what they believe in, but were met with very different responses from the right wing television host. 

James and Durant were criticized by Ingraham after calling out President Trump in a ‘Uninterrupted’ video with Cari Champion. 

“The number one job in America, the point of person, is someone who doesn’t understand the people and really don’t give a f*** about the people.” — LeBron James

“I feel like our team as a country is not ran by a great coach.” — Kevin Durant 

Each person was speaking their truth and the response was met with hypocritical responses. 

Brees has since apologized for his comments. 

View this post on Instagram

I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused. In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character. This is where I stand: I stand with the black community in the fight against systemic racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference. I condemn the years of oppression that have taken place throughout our black communities and still exists today. I acknowledge that we as Americans, including myself, have not done enough to fight for that equality or to truly understand the struggles and plight of the black community. I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the black community in this movement. I will never know what it’s like to be a black man or raise black children in America but I will work every day to put myself in those shoes and fight for what is right. I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening...and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen. For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

“We still feel the hate off decisions we make that we feel like is best for us,” James said. “Having the word ’n*****’ painted over my gate— that tells you I’m not too far removed and I’ve still got a lot of work left to do. No matter how far money or access or how you become in life as an African American man— they will always try to find a way to let you know that you’re beneath them.”

James, as well as Seahawks receiver Tyler Lockett, remain incredibly active on social media to fight against racial injustice. They’re using their platform to amplify the voices that have been silenced and hope to create substantive change.

With a heavy heart, Russell Wilson shares poignant thoughts on racism in America

With a heavy heart, Russell Wilson shares poignant thoughts on racism in America

Russell Wilson used his words more forcefully and directly on Wednesday than I’d ever seen before.

During a Zoom call with local reporters, the Seahawks quarterback opted not to talk about football and focus on the current events surrounding George Floyd’s murder at the hands of the police and the ensuing nationwide protests.

“I think racism is heavier than ever,” Wilson said. “Watching someone get murdered in the street by the people that are supposed to protect – being able to see that on Instagram or Twitter or whatever – it’s appalling. It pains my heart.”

Wilson noted how his great great grandparents were slaves. He discussed how his father used to tell him to keep his hands out of his pockets when they were out in public.

The quarterback’s late father also had to have a talk with him when he got his driver’s license at age 16. Wilson explains that he, too, will eventually have to teach his kids how to act if and when they get pulled over by the police. He notably has one stepson, a daughter and a third child, a son, on the way.

“The thought of having those conversations with my kids someday is a heavy thing,” Wilson said.

The presence of racism remains apparent in America, even for the uber famous like Wilson. He shared a story shortly after the Seahawks won their first ever Super Bowl in February of 2014. Wilson was grabbing breakfast somewhere in California when an older white gentleman told him “that’s not for you.”

Wilson thought the man was joking at first before realizing otherwise. That experience, while remarkably absurd that such obtuse beliefs still exist, pales in comparison to some of the violence that takes place at the hands of the police.

Floyd’s murder is merely the latest example, but it’s clearly the straw that broke the camel’s back given the immense response around the country.

“Not much has changed,” Wilson said. “The reality is enough is enough. … It’s pretty heavy to watch someone get murdered like that or killed. I think ultimately, it brings a lot of pain.”

Wilson’s words on Wednesday come on the heels of his statement that was released Monday morning on social media.

Several of the quarterback’s teammates have also offered public messages, and Wilson shared that the Seahawks continue to have internal conversations on the matter in their daily virtual team meetings.

Honest dialogue and a common understanding that a problem exists in this country is a huge first step in progress. But Wilson knows it must be followed by meaningful action if change is to be realized.

“We need to make a difference. We need to make sure that we’re voting for the right people,” Wilson said. “We need to make sure we’re doing the right things that allow change and also across the board in our systems and our systematic flow of how we do things has to change as well.”

Russell Wilson edges NFL MVP Lamar Jackson on PFF50 list in 2020

Russell Wilson edges NFL MVP Lamar Jackson on PFF50 list in 2020

Russell Wilson may have not received a single NFL Most Valuable Player vote in 2019, but Pro Football Focus says Wilson, not Jackson, is the better quarterback. 

PFF released its top 50 players of 2020 list and the Seahawks franchise quarterback has landed at No. 7 overall, just one spot higher than reigning MVP Jackson. 

Wilson trailed only Aaron Donald, Patrick Mahomes, Julio Jones, Quenton Nelson, George Kittle and Michael Thomas on the list. 

Here’s why PFF slotted Wilson at No. 7 on the PFF50 list: 

Russell Wilson made it only to No. 33 in PFF’s All-Decade 101 list, but he has taken his game to another level over the past couple of seasons. In 2019, it was Wilson — not Lamar Jackson — who led all players in PFF WAR (wins above replacement) and had the second-best overall PFF grade. Over the past three years, Wilson has 27 more big-time throws (PFF’s highest-graded passes) than any other passer, while 12 quarterbacks have more turnover-worthy plays than him. Wilson is held back only by how little his own team puts the ball in his hands.

Last season, Wilson finished the season with 4,110 passing yards, 41 passing touchdowns and just five interceptions. He added 342 yards and three more scores as a runner while leading the Seahawks to the Divisional Round, where they ultimately fell to the Packers. 

It’s worth mentioning that Wilson also edged Jackson by a substantial margin in PFF’s MVP race in 2019. He led PFF's WAR metric with a rating of 4.08, which was at least a full point higher than the four next closest players: Patrick Mahomes (2.96), Dak Prescott (2.40), Aaron Rodgers (2.38) and Jackson (2.29). 

Despite Wilson’s incredible season, which featured many career milestones and records, the 31-year-old will once again look to show the doubters just how valuable he is behind center. Perhaps 2020 will be the year he finally takes home the coveted MVP trophy. 

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and legendary running back Curt Warner. 

Seahawks players rip Vic Fangio for saying there’s "no racism" in NFL

Seahawks players rip Vic Fangio for saying there’s "no racism" in NFL

Denver Broncos Head Coach Vic Fangio knows that there is still racism alive and well out in the real world that needs to be fixed.

Sad thing is, he believes that there is no racism in the NFL.

You can already imagine, this did not go overwell with a lot of people.

Especially some current Seattle Seahawks players.

As a team, the Broncos held a meeting along with president Joe Ellis to have an important dialogue surrounding the issue of race and police brutality that is currently sweeping the nation as of now.

Fangio in the meeting made it clear, that he does not think the league has a discrimination problem.

I think our problems in the NFL along those lines are minimal. We're a league of meritocracy. You earn what you get, you get what you earn. I don't see racism at all in the NFL, I don't see discrimination in the NFL. We all live together, joined as one, for one common goal, and we all intermingle and mix tremendously. If society reflected an NFL team, we'd all be great.

That statement alone got the attention of current Seahawks running Chris Carson, who tweeted about Fangio calling him “a joke”.

Seahawks safety Quandre Diggs also chimed in on Twitter with his response to Fangio and his comments about race in the NFL.

Fangio, a white head coach, might not understand the problem with these comments due to the fact that he is of the older generation and not having to deal with issues of being black on a daily basis. 

But still, for him to be tone-deaf to think the NFL isn’t racist in any way is another wake-up call for everyone right now that more people to informed about racial injustice in America.

Although Fangio showed he is not fully aware of racism in the NFL, he expressed how emotional he was regarding George Floyd and his death that was caused by a police officer in Minneapolis putting a knee on his neck.

“I was shocked, sad, and angry when I saw what the policeman do to a handcuffed George Floyd on his stomach that led to his death,” Fangio said. “He should be punished to the full extent of the law of the crimes he was charged with in addition to being charged with treason for failing to uphold the badge and uniform he was entrusted with . . . It’s a societal issue that we all have to join in to correct.”

Fangio at least understands that change needs to happen as a result of what happened to George Floyd.

But now, more than ever, he needs to see that racism is prevalent in not just American soil, but is still alive in the NFL as well.

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and legendary running back Curt Warner. 

Pete Carroll issues powerful statement calling for cultural transformation 

Pete Carroll issues powerful statement calling for cultural transformation 

Pete Carroll will not let his voice go unheard.

The Seattle Seahawks head coach put aside his offseason program to listen to his players as they aired out their frustrations following the death of George Floyd, a black man who was killed in Minneapolis after Derek Chauvin, a white police officer, kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes.

[RELATED: Pete Carroll calls Colin Kaepernick’s protest ‘a symbol of courage and vision’]

He heard their hurt, anger and frustration, and he urged them to use their platforms as NFL athletes to grow and bring upon change. 

On Wednesday, in a powerful statement titled “Where Do We Go From Here,” Carroll used his platform as Seahawks coach to call for cultural transformation, demanding equality and respect for all.   

We are living in the midst of a cultural transformation. And we’ve never needed it more than now. 

Racial tensions are elevating to unprecedented levels as black men and women continue to be murdered and mistreated in unjust fashion. The impact of the pandemic has seemingly faded into the background as we process and react to yet another horrific tragedy. 

These days are challenging and call on all of us to search our souls. 

The current tumultuous time of racial injustice has led to protests that have demonstrated extraordinary images of diversity and solidarity. 

Out of this moment, let us seize the opportunity to discover a new caring, one grounded in a new awareness, a new compassion, a new empathy. This philosophy will guide our decision-making as we rebuild our communities, reform our institutions, and demand justice for all.  

While there are many ways to contribute to change, we can start by making a heartfelt commitment to treat all people equally and with the respect they deserve. The fundamental place to begin is to treat others like you wish to be treated. 

Please consider living out a renewed commitment to empathy. Make a conscious effort to listen, to understand, to care and to build bridges. 

Be a part of this cultural transformation by moving toward a new caring for others. Together we can capture this moment and create a culture of New Empathy—one day at a time, one person at a time. 

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and legendary running back Curt Warner. 

Pete Carroll puts aside offseason training to discuss social issues with team

Pete Carroll puts aside offseason training to discuss social issues with team

Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll has brought in some special guests to his team’s offseason meetings over the years.

Recently, Carroll’s longtime friend, comedian Will Ferrell crashed a Seahawks Zoom session when he posed as veteran tight end Greg Olsen.

But meetings over the past two weeks have taken on a more serious tone.

On The Ringer’s “Flying Coach” podcast with Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr and San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich, Carroll shared how he’s using virtual meetings to discuss social issues with his team and why it’s important to give his players an outlet to express their feelings with protests ongoing following the death of George Floyd.  

Because of our long-standing relationships with our teams and our players and the backgrounds and always caring about them enough to want to know about their families, want to know where they come from, want to know what they’ve been through, to try to understand them better, to love them better as we go through the process to try to make winning teams, the connection is so deep and the understanding as I have learned over the years about the pain and the discomfort, the horrific burden that our players carry with them. The responsibility to want to do something, knowing that we’re in a position that maybe we could do something, it makes it such a challenge because you feel so helpless.

How can we prevent this from being a reality?”

'Beginning last Friday, Carroll began ditching virtual training sessions and instead welcomed players to air their frustrations on Floyd’s death. He said the team broke out into their individual teams to “let guys speak their hearts and talk about how this impacting them and how its effecting them, so that we can all share in everybody’s stories.”

The conversation continued on Monday following a heated weekend of protests in Seattle and across the country. Carroll encouraged his players to use their platform to come together to grow and bring upon change.

We’ve been here before, and we’ve been through this before from my younger players, the guys that are the rooks coming in, it’s an opportunity for them to hear from our leaders and we have marvelous guys that speak on behalf of the communities, that speak on behalf of their families and on behalf of themselves as teammates, they show the way for younger guys that they can speak and talk in our environment and communicate all in the hopes of finding some kind of sense of understanding and how do we take the next step with this new experience that we just lived through, so horrific as it is again. It’s again is what kills us. We were facing it again and unfortunately the fear of it happening again and ahead of us, it’s unbearable.

All-Pro linebacker Bobby Wagner told reporters on Monday that he appreciated the 68-year-old coach’s willingness to allow players to express their feelings on the state of the country.

“At the end of the day, life is bigger than football,” Wagner said. “There are things happening bigger than football.”

[RELATED: Bobby Wagner’s full statement on the death of George Floyd]

The Seahawks also announced Monday that players will donate $500k to policy reinforcement, judiciary protections and accountability, and for advanced education related to the history of race in America.

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and legendary running back Curt Warner.