Seattle Seahawks

Social media reacts: Seahawks top Vikings to take control of NFC West

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Social media reacts: Seahawks top Vikings to take control of NFC West

The Seahawks took control of their destiny in the NFC West with a 37-30 win over the Minnesota Vikings on Monday Night Football.

With the win, the Seahawks took over the NFC West and second place in the NFC. Had they lost, Seattle would have fallen all the way back to the five-seed. It was a crucial game with high stakes, but only one team could come away victorious. 

After trailing 17-10 at halftime, the floodgates officially opened for the Seahawks, thanks to two touchdowns from Rashaad Penny, a 60-yard bomb from Russell Wilson to David Moore and how could we forget the defense? That Bradley McDougald recovery and Tre Flowers pick was out of this world. 

Here's a look at how fans and media reacted to the Seahawks 37-30 win over the Vikings in prime time: 

It was the 1-2 punch Pete Carroll has talked about all season long, but we finally saw it in real life. Carson, who sustained a hard hit early on which required a trip to medical tent, got things started for Seattle and scored the first touchdown of the game.

Rashaad Penny responded with one of his own in the third quarter, when he came in on a second-and-goal. Seahawks Twitter kind of lost it. 

Then David Moore was left wide open at the end of the third quarter. The Seahawks wide receiver caught a 60-yard bomb from Wilson to extend the lead to 27-17.

The touchdown pass was Wilson’s 63rd touchdown pass that traveled at least 20 air yards, according to ESPN Stats & Info.

The game wouldn't be complete without some defensive stops. Bradley McDougald came up with a clutch recovery and Tre Flowers intercepted the Vikings, which turned in a seven-point play. 

Rashaad Penny SZN wasn't over yet, though. The rook cooked the Viks defense when he sprinted into the end zone for his second touchdown of the game. 

With the 37-30 victory, the Seahawks are now 10-2 on the year and the best in the (NFC) West. Seattle will next head to Los Angeles to take on the Rams, who are coming off a 34-7 stomping over the Arizona Cardinals in Week 13. 

Ugo Amadi’s message on racial injustice and equality is poignant and real

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USATI

Ugo Amadi’s message on racial injustice and equality is poignant and real

Ugo Amadi is breaking his silence.

In wake of George Floyd’s death, the Seattle Seahawks nickel expressed his feelings on racism in this country and the ensuing nationwide protests.

Amadi told Alistair Corp of Field Gulls that he’s had the opportunity to speak with many of his teammates regarding ongoing racial injustice, but his message is one that resonates with everyone. 

His full statement below:

It’s a subject you have to talk about among your peers, regardless of your race. We talked about it as a team, it starts off with education, you have to educate yourself. History repeats itself—you have to educate yourself. First, you talk the education, then you talk the racism, then you talk about equality. It doesn’t matter what race you are; it doesn’t matter whether you’re lesbian, straight, bi, it doesn’t matter. It’s about treating people equally. That’s the biggest thing and that’s what we’re not getting right now. People are not seeing that. In this world, God brought people to this world that are good and evil. We’re dealing with good people and evil people. The evil people are overshadowing the good people.

It’s a bad thing we’re going through right now, because we got kids who are going to grow up and be right in the position we are. We need a leader to show the way of how the world is supposed to be, because nobody should be treated better than one another. As an African American, I understand people are looting and stuff like that, but at a certain point, people have to understand what it feels like to have a target on their back, each and every day, no matter the situation. 

The Seahawks were one of the first NFL teams to issue a statement decrying racism and violence against the black community in the wake of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody last week.

Floyd died on May 25th after white police officer Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes. Charges were elevated for Chauvin, from third-to-second degree murder on Wednesday. Three other officers were charged with aiding and abetting murder.  

Amadi isn’t the only Seahawk to speak out about the recent events. Multiple Seahawks including Russell Wilson, DK Metcalf, Duane Brown, Bobby Wagner, and Tyler Lockett addressed Floyd and described how the video of his death impacted them as an African American men living in the United States.

[RELATED: With a heavy heart, Russell Wilson shares poignant thoughts on racism in America]

The team offered their condolences to the families of Floyd, as well as Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, and announced that players will donate $500k to policy reinforcement, judiciary protections and accountability, and for advanced education related to the history of race in America.

Seahawks nickel Ugo Amadi isn’t competing against anyone other than himself 

Seahawks nickel Ugo Amadi isn’t competing against anyone other than himself 

A lot has changed since Ugo Amadi played his last game with the Oregon Ducks, was drafted in the NFL and suited up in a Seattle Seahawks uniform for a first time.

After taking over as the Seahawks primary nickelback spot in his first season, Amadi is poised to be the leading candidate for the starting nickel corner in 2020. In Seattle's last three games, Amadi played 55 defensive snaps, produced five tackles and nearly returned an interception for six points against Carolina in Week 15.

In an interview with Alistair Corp of Field Gulls, the former Oregon standout reflected on the challenges he faced in his first year and what’s on the horizon for him in year 2. He also sounded off on Pete Carroll’s comments at the NFL Draft that the starting nickel spot is Amadi’s to lose.

It doesn’t change my mentality at all, I’m still going to go in wanting to win my job every day. I feel like my jobs on the line every day. That’s how it was my rookie year, even on special teams. I’m not worried about competing with nobody else, it’s all about the man in the mirror to me. I want the best for myself, so I’m going to make sure I’m on my stuff at all times, make sure I’m mentally prepared, because if I only focus on other people, I can’t get my own job done. That’s not just with ball that’s with anything in life.

I feel like, with those words being said by Pete, he knows, and I know that will be something that makes me sharpen my iron and make me put in the extra work to know this or know that.

This offseason is certainly different than Amadi’s first year in the league. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the offseason program has gone completely virtual with teams taking to Zoom video conferencing to communicate.

Amadi says he’s been doing a lot of independent film sessions and feels for the rookies who are forced to learn in an alternative environment this year. 

Like you said, it’s not like I’m flying blind through it. It’s a good experience, you’re still able to get the work in, coaches ask you questions to make sure you’re focused and locked in, paying attention. But I feel bad for the rookies because defense has certain verbiage and that verbiage is different for every single team. So, they don’t really know until you get that walk-through rep. I feel bad for them. For me, it’s all just memory so it’s another way of learning. It’s a different way of learning but you get something out of it every day—especially with our team.

The 23-year-old mentioned players like Shaquill Griffin, Quandre Diggs and Bradley McDougald, who have taken on leadership roles now that the Legion of Boom has departed. 

Amadi says McDougald in particular has helped mentor and shape him as a versatile defensive back. 

“He helped me out a lot,” Amadi said. “I used to always watch film with him and he was the one that really taught me the little details and how crucial gap fitting is, and taking notes so you can retain the information. His style of play is something that influenced me, being physical at all times because the opponent will bring it to you every snap, so you have to prepare for that mentally and physically.”

If Amadi obtains the slot corner starting spot, he'll join McDougald, Griffin, Diggs and Tre Flowers as presumptive starters on the Seahawks secondary when Seattle kicks off the season this fall. 

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and Voice of the Seahawks, broadcaster Steve Raible. 

Seahawks LB K.J. Wright preparing to be on the field Week 1

Seahawks LB K.J. Wright preparing to be on the field Week 1

K.J. Wright underwent shoulder surgery this offseason, but his intention is to be ready to go when the Seattle Seahawks kick off the 2020 NFL season. 

“Health is good,” Wright told Ian Furness of Sports Radio 950 KJR. “I’m ahead of schedule of where I need to be and if there’s a football season, I plan on being out there game one.” 

During the NFL Draft, Seattle GM John Schneider revealed that the 30-year-old linebacker had underwent surgery and was in the rehabilitation process. 

“I’m not sure of the timeline on when he’s going to be back,” Schneider said. “Hopefully, he makes it back on time, and we’ll see how it goes. It’s just a weird offseason. I mean for everybody, but especially for guys that have had offseason surgery.”

Some had speculated that Wright, who started 124 games in his nine seasons for Seattle, was planning to retire after the Seahawks took Texas Tech linebacker Jordyn Brooks in the first round of the 2020 NFL Draft.

But Schneider instead hinted at the possibility the 10-year pro could move to the strongside linebacker spot, providing him with more opportunities to rush the quarterback. Brooks would have a chance to compete for the weakside linebacker position of the future next to Bobby Wagner. 

Wright is entering the final year of his contract this season. Wright, along with Wagner and veteran Bruce Irvin, are expected to be Seattle’s starting linebackers in 2020. 

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and Voice of the Seahawks, broadcaster Steve Raible. 

Bobby Wagner expresses optimism that Seahawks defense will improve in 2020

Bobby Wagner expresses optimism that Seahawks defense will improve in 2020

Bobby Wagner spent nearly an hour talking to reporters earlier this week via Zoom. Most of the conversation, of course, centered around the murder of George Floyd and the ensuing protests that continue as we head into the weekend.

But there was some football talk as well, namely Wagner’s thoughts on his defense heading into 2020.

The Seahawks were average at best on that side of the ball last season. Seattle’s defense ranked 18th in DVOA, 22nd in scoring defense, 26th in yards allowed and T-30th in sacks. The one saving grace was that the Seahawks ranked third in takeaways (16 interceptions, 16 fumble recoveries).

“I think we’re hungry,” Wagner said. “I think we can look back defensively from last year and really know that we didn’t play to a level we could have played at. We don’t want to lower the standard. The standard is set. We want to make sure that we reach that standard and push that standard up.”

The jury is still out as to whether or not they took enough steps this offseason to ensure that the group will be better this year. Jadeveon Clowney remains a free agent and it’s been discussed ad nauseam that Seattle is yet to sign a premier pass rusher.

To this point, the Seahawks have chosen lower-budget free agent options Benson Mayowa and Bruce Irvin while using second and fifth-round picks on Darrell Taylor and Alton Robinson, respectively.

In the secondary, they added veteran corner Quinton Dunbar via trade with the Redskins. It was a savvy move from John Schneider that could end up being his best of the offseason. It could also end up being an absolute zero depending on how Dunbar’s armed robbery charges play out. (It should be noted that the charges seem flimsy at this point, which is good news for Dunbar and the Seahawks.)

Seattle used its first-round pick on linebacker Jordyn Brooks. How quickly he integrates into the defense and what his role will be is arguably the biggest wildcard on Seattle’s defense heading into the season.

So while there have been some intriguing additions, there are still major question marks when you look at Seattle’s roster on paper. Wagner, as should be the case with any leader, isn’t deterred.

“How things look on paper is just paper,” the linebacker said.

Wagner pointed to having safety Quandre Diggs for a full season as another source of optimism. Diggs, a midseason trade acquisition in 2019, transformed Seattle’s defense upon his arrival. In just five games, he tied for the team-high with three interceptions (Tre Flowers also had three) and was named a Pro Bowl alternate.

That’s even more impressive when you consider that he arrived in Seattle while nursing a hamstring injury and then suffered a sprained ankle towards the end of the season. A healthy Diggs should continue to be the lynchpin in the Seahawks secondary in 2020.

“That’s just one example,” Wagner said. “I think we have great leadership. I think we are hungry. Personally, I can’t wait to get back out there on the field.”

Seattle, along with the rest of the league, has been limited to virtual team meetings due to COVID-19. But while the offseason program was essentially scrapped, there’s optimism that training camp will be able to start on time. That’s when we’ll get our first glimpse at this year’s version of Wagner’s defense.

Josh Gordon's Instagram posts reveal his ideal NFL destination

Josh Gordon's Instagram posts reveal his ideal NFL destination

Josh Gordon wants to return to the NFL and his eyes are set on Seattle. 

In a post on Instagram Tuesday, Gordon shared a photo alongside Russell Wilson, Shaquem Griffin and Jacob Hollister with the caption “here to serve.” 

The post comes one day after Gordon shared a graphic photo of himself in a Seahawks uniform with the words, “here is me and I am him too.” 

Gordon, who was suspended indefinitely in December for his fifth violation of the NFL’s substance abuse policy, was recently seen working out alongside DK Metcalf and Bobby Wagner, as well as 49ers corner Richard Sherman.    

As previously reported by Jeremy Fowler and Brady Henderson of ESPN, the 28-year-old has been working with the NFL to lift his indefinite suspension. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell will oversee Gordon’s reinstatement. 

Gordon was claimed off waivers by the Seattle last November. He recorded seven receptions for 139 yards in five games as the team's No. 3 receiver behind Tyler Lockett and DK Metcalf. 

He was suspended indefinitely last December for the fifth time since 2013 for violating the NFL’s policy on both performance-enhancing drugs and substance abuse. 

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll didn’t close the door on a possible Gordon return and urged Gordon to use the resources the league offers to receive help. 

Russell Wilson could certainly use more weapons in 2020, despite the Seahawks adding speedy wideout Phillip Dorsett to the roster in March. Wilson has been reportedly advocating for Seattle to add free agent Antonio Brown, who continues to sit on the Commissioners Exempt List for allegations involving sexual assault towards his former trainer.

Be sure to check out the latest Talkin' Seahawks Podcast with host Joe Fann and legendary running back Curt Warner. 

Seahawks cancel team meetings as George Floyd’s memorial takes place

Seahawks cancel team meetings as George Floyd’s memorial takes place

The Seattle Seahawks will not hold virtual meetings on Thursday, June 4, as a memorial service to honor George Floyd is underway in Minneapolis, according to Jeremy Fowler of ESPN. 

Floyd died on May 25 after white police officer Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes. Charges were elevated for Chauvin, from third-to-second degree murder on Wednesday. Three other officers were charged with aiding and abetting murder.  

Three memorials over six days are planned in cities where Floyd born, grew up and died. 

Russell Wilson, Duane Brown, DK Metcalf, Bobby Wagner and Tyler Lockett are among several Seahawks who have spoken out about Floyd’s tragic death, as well as racial injustice and police brutality in America. 

Seahawks coach Pete Carroll recently made the decision to put offseason training aside to give players an outlet to express their feelings with protests ongoing.

We’ve been here before, and we’ve been through this before from my younger players, the guys that are the rooks coming in, it’s an opportunity for them to hear from our leaders and we have marvelous guys that speak on behalf of the communities, that speak on behalf of their families and on behalf of themselves as teammates, they show the way for younger guys that they can speak and talk in our environment and communicate all in the hopes of finding some kind of sense of understanding and how do we take the next step with this new experience that we just lived through, so horrific as it is again. -- Pete Carroll 

Seattle is just one of many teams allowing players time off to watch the memorial. 

Arizona Cardinals running back Kenyan Drake shared a post on Twitter that the Cardinals are doing the same. 

Several Minnesota Vikings players are attending the memorial in Minneapolis. Vikings virtual meetings are canceled so players who cannot attend the memorial can watch the day's events. 

Steve Raible shares his all-time favorite call as voice of the Seahawks

Steve Raible shares his all-time favorite call as voice of the Seahawks

Steve Raible’s career arc is incredible.

The Seahawks selected him in the second round of the 1976 NFL Draft out of Georgia Tech. Raible, a 6-2 receiver, spent six years playing in Seattle from 1976-81. He caught 68 passes for 1,017 yards and three touchdowns in 84 career games.

In 1982, he was approached by Pete Gross, the original voice of the Seahawks, about joining the broadcast booth as his color guy. Raible accepted, retired from football and immediately hopped into the broadcast booth.

That in and of itself isn’t completely out of the ordinary. Lots of former athletes become TV or radio analysts. Raible had gotten reps with local Seattle radio and TV stations that helped prepare him for the opportunity.

But 22 years later in 2004, Raible made the jump from color to play-by-play, a move seldom (if ever) seen from former athletes. He thrived in the role and remains the current voice of the Seahawks. Including his time as a player, 2020 will be Raible’s 44th year with the organization. Forty four.

Raible was kind enough to share the details of his story as the latest guest on the Talkin’ Seahawks Podcast. During the conversation, Raible discussed how broadcasting legend Verne Lundquist aided his transition to play-by-play, the origin of his famous “holy catfish” call and the pain of losing Super Bowl XL to the Steelers.

He also shared his memories of calling the Seahawks first ever Super Bowl win over the Broncos in January of 2014. The end of that 43-8 beatdown at MetLife Stadium provided Raible with the stage to make his favorite call of his entire career.

With just seconds left on the clock, Raible captured the moment perfectly, saying “12s, bringing the trophy home, your Seahawks are Super Bowl champions.”

“That’s the most fun call I’ve ever had. It wasn’t a play, but it was the exclamation to that night,” Raible said. “That was the moment we could all celebrate and boy we sure did.”

Raible is part of an incredible legacy of Seattle sports broadcasters that includes fellow legends like the late Dave Niehaus, Bob Rondo, Kevin Calabro, Rick Rizzs and others. Hearing him discuss his pride in the Emerald City is something that makes him so endearing to all Seattle natives.

Head here to listen to the full conversation and to catch up on past episodes of the Talkin Seahawks Podcast.

Current, former Seahawks respond to Drew Brees’ comments about the flag

Current, former Seahawks respond to Drew Brees’ comments about the flag

Drew Brees has come under intense criticism since offering his first public comments on Wednesday in the wake of George Floyd’s death.

During the interview with Yahoo! Finance, the New Orleans Saints quarterback mischaracterized the protests of Colin Kaepernick and other NFL players as “disrespecting the flag.”

"I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country,” Brees said. "Let me just tell you what I see or what I feel when the national anthem is played, and when I look at the flag of the United States. I envision my two grandfathers, who fought for this country during World War II, one in the Army and one in the Marine Corp. Both risking their lives to protect our country and to try to make our country and this world a better place."

The star quarterback’s comments drew a sharp rebuke on social media from many of his Saints teammates including Malcolm Jenkins and Demario Davis, who are among leaders of the players coalition seeking social justice and racial equality. 

Brees’ stance startled many current and former Seattle Seahawks players, including outspoken wide receiver Doug Baldwin who called Brees part of the problem. 

Former Legion of Boom enforcer Kam Chancellor responded to a post from a fan that encouraged him to return for one game to “drop the hammer” and light Brees up. 

Chancellor’s response: “That would be a nasty scene.” 

Richard Sherman, who played for the Seahawks from 2011-17 before joining the San Francisco 49ers, called Brees “beyond lost” with his remarks about kneeling in the NFL. 

Seattle wide receiver Tyler Lockett quote tweeted a video regarding how Fox News host Laura Ingraham responded to LeBron James and Kevin Durant’s ‘freedom’ of speech, which blasted President of the United States Donald Trump, and Drew Brees’ comments about taking a knee during the anthem. 

Second-year wide receiver DK Metcalf shared this post following Brees' apology on social media.  

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson has long idolized Brees for paving way for shorter quarterbacks in the NFL. During last year’s Pro Bowl, upon Brees retirement rumors, Wilson gave up his starting spot to the future Hall of Famer.  

When speaking with reporters on Wednesday, Wilson said he hadn’t yet gotten the opportunity to see Brees’ full comments on taking a knee the anthem. He did say, however, that he believes former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was trying to do the right thing. 

I was in meetings. I just got out of meetings. I didn’t get to watch the whole thing. The reality is, Colin was trying to symbolize the oppression that was going on in America, that has been going on for 400 years. And I think people go into a box of, ‘OK, this person is this, and that person is that, because they didn’t do this, or they didn’t do that. The reality is what Colin was trying to do was sit down and do the right thing and try to stand up, figuratively, for what is going on in America. 

It’s heavy on me. ...Colin, for me, he was trying to symbolize the right thing. People may have taken that the wrong way, but he was trying to do the right thing, the bottom line. And he stood up in so many amazing ways to really stand up for black lives and what is going on, and the oppression that is going on. ...I think it is the right thing is that he has been trying to do.

[RELATED: With a heavy heart, Russell Wilson shares poignant thoughts on racism in America]

Brees has issued an apology for his comments. You can read the full statement below. 

View this post on Instagram

I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused. In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character. This is where I stand: I stand with the black community in the fight against systemic racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference. I condemn the years of oppression that have taken place throughout our black communities and still exists today. I acknowledge that we as Americans, including myself, have not done enough to fight for that equality or to truly understand the struggles and plight of the black community. I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the black community in this movement. I will never know what it’s like to be a black man or raise black children in America but I will work every day to put myself in those shoes and fight for what is right. I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening...and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen. For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

Tyler Lockett points out glaring hypocrisy of response to Drew Brees' remarks

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Tyler Lockett points out glaring hypocrisy of response to Drew Brees' remarks

Drew Brees became a trending topic on Twitter Wednesday afternoon after saying he would disapprove of NFL players taking a knee during the national anthem this upcoming season: “I will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United States of America or our country.”

The New Orleans Saints quarterback explained when he hears the anthem he thinks of his grandfathers that fought in the military and taking a knee during the song would disrespect the flag. 

Many online found the comments insensitive or ill-informed given the nationwide outcry against systemic racial injustice in this country in response to police brutality, and more specifically the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis Police Custody last month.

That includes Seahawks wide receiver Tyler Lockett, who quote tweeted a video regarding how Fox News host Laura Ingraham responded to LeBron James and Kevin Durant’s ‘freedom’ of speech, which blasted President of the United States Donald Trump, and Drew Brees’ comments about taking a knee during the anthem. 

Here’s a side by side look of Ingraham’s comments: 

On LeBron James and Kevin Durant: “It’s always unwise to seek political advice from someone who makes $100M a year to bounce a ball. Oh, and LeBron, Kevin— you’re great players, but no one voted for you. Millions elected Trump to be their coach. So, keep the political commentary to yourself, or as someone once said, ‘shut up and dribble.’”

On Drew Brees: “Well, he’s allowed to have his view about what kneeling and the flag means to him. He’s a person. He has some worth. This is beyond football. This is totalitarian conduct. This is Stalinist. And by the way, on the streets of New Orleans, they’re shouting ‘F*** Drew Brees.’ That’s what this moment has done to the beautiful team spirit of the New Orleans Saints.”

LeBron James and Kevin Durant are black. Drew Brees is white. 

Both took a stand for what they believe in, but were met with very different responses from the right wing television host. 

James and Durant were criticized by Ingraham after calling out President Trump in a ‘Uninterrupted’ video with Cari Champion. 

“The number one job in America, the point of person, is someone who doesn’t understand the people and really don’t give a f*** about the people.” — LeBron James

“I feel like our team as a country is not ran by a great coach.” — Kevin Durant 

Each person was speaking their truth and the response was met with hypocritical responses. 

Brees has since apologized for his comments. 

View this post on Instagram

I would like to apologize to my friends, teammates, the City of New Orleans, the black community, NFL community and anyone I hurt with my comments yesterday. In speaking with some of you, it breaks my heart to know the pain I have caused. In an attempt to talk about respect, unity, and solidarity centered around the American flag and the national anthem, I made comments that were insensitive and completely missed the mark on the issues we are facing right now as a country. They lacked awareness and any type of compassion or empathy. Instead, those words have become divisive and hurtful and have misled people into believing that somehow I am an enemy. This could not be further from the truth, and is not an accurate reflection of my heart or my character. This is where I stand: I stand with the black community in the fight against systemic racial injustice and police brutality and support the creation of real policy change that will make a difference. I condemn the years of oppression that have taken place throughout our black communities and still exists today. I acknowledge that we as Americans, including myself, have not done enough to fight for that equality or to truly understand the struggles and plight of the black community. I recognize that I am part of the solution and can be a leader for the black community in this movement. I will never know what it’s like to be a black man or raise black children in America but I will work every day to put myself in those shoes and fight for what is right. I have ALWAYS been an ally, never an enemy. I am sick about the way my comments were perceived yesterday, but I take full responsibility and accountability. I recognize that I should do less talking and more listening...and when the black community is talking about their pain, we all need to listen. For that, I am very sorry and I ask your forgiveness.

A post shared by Drew Brees (@drewbrees) on

“We still feel the hate off decisions we make that we feel like is best for us,” James said. “Having the word ’n*****’ painted over my gate— that tells you I’m not too far removed and I’ve still got a lot of work left to do. No matter how far money or access or how you become in life as an African American man— they will always try to find a way to let you know that you’re beneath them.”

James, as well as Seahawks receiver Tyler Lockett, remain incredibly active on social media to fight against racial injustice. They’re using their platform to amplify the voices that have been silenced and hope to create substantive change.