Channing Frye

Headstrong: Channing Frye offers advice for those who seek it

Headstrong: Channing Frye offers advice for those who seek it

The month of November is Men's Health Awareness Month. ‘The Movember Foundation’ uses November to bring awareness to various men’s physical and mental health issues, as well as support to those tackling prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health, and more.

Throughout this month, NBC Sports will be releasing numerous videos that feature sports superstars discussing the importance of mental health as well as how they approach the subject. Former NBA star, and former Portland Trail Blazer Channing Frye, was one such athlete that participated in the nationwide project.

It can get better. You can't see it... but it's there

- Channing Frye

Channing Frye has been very open about his battle with depression in recent years. His struggles with mental health had him in a fog. A space where eating was a chore and smiling was a challenge. While he was shining under the bright lights of the NBA, he was in a dark space in his mind. 

But Frye was able to persevere. He was able to clear the fog and find his happy place once again. In doing so, he has been able to offer advice to those who seek to find it. The silliest sounding remedy may just be the cure.

Think outside the box. Wake up, put on happy music, even if you gotta wake up and dance. It seems silly... wake up and say 'I'm thankful for this,' or 'I'm thankful for that.' Change something that you're doing.

Change up the routine, no matter how small. If you are in a dark place and continue to do the same things day-to-day, you can never expect to clear the fog. To clear it, you have to change. Even a minor alteration can have a major impact. While the journey will not be without its bumps, it will be worth it in the end. 

"You're gonna get through it, and you're gonna be better for it, and you're gonna appreciate life a lot more."

You can hear more from Channing Frye in the video above.

Talkin' Blazers Podcast: How do you tell the history of the Blazers without Brandon Roy?

Talkin' Blazers Podcast: How do you tell the history of the Blazers without Brandon Roy?

Carmelo Anthony is back after officially signing with the Portland Trail Blazers on Tuesday. However, the Blazers did not make his jersey number 7 available to Melo.

No. 7 hasn't been sported since Brandon Roy last wore it in 2011.

Trail Blazers faithful believe and hope that Roy’s No. 7 will eventually be retired by Portland.

In the latest edition of the Talkin' Blazers Podcast with Channing Frye and Dan Sheldon, the two discussed B-Roy’s legacy.

Frye raises the question: “How do you tell the history of the Blazers without Brandon Roy?”

“Injuries aside, that guy was one of the best players," Frye said on the latest Talkin’ Blazers Podcast. “I’ve played with Hall of Fame guys, and his injury out of all the injuries I’ve seen in the NBA, cut one of the best careers short. That guy was a constant professional, he knew basketball, he was a great teammate, and great leader, and he was a winner. When it came down to winning time, he wanted the ball and he knew how to score and he knew how to make plays.”

There’s no doubt that both Frye and Roy are two fan-favorites in Rip City in different ways.

But for Frye, he had a lot of praise for how B-Roy fought through pain. 

“I seen him in a game where he drained his knee,” Frye said. “It was disgusting how much stuff came out of his knee. And he went and gave Phoenix 52 points. At that point, I knew he was the real deal Holyfield.”

If a player is ‘the real deal Holyfield’ it would be hard to believe his jersey number would not get retired.

Listen to the full Talkin' Blazers podcast below:

Talkin' Blazers with Channing Frye: Ranking the nightlife on the current road trip

Talkin' Blazers with Channing Frye: Ranking the nightlife on the current road trip

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be on the road in the NBA? Numerous days on airplanes, numerous nights in hotels, all the best food from around the country, and more!

Sure, it can be exhausting, but it’s not without its moments of relaxation and fun.

In the latest edition of the Talkin’ Blazers Podcast, Channing Frye ranks the nightlife on the Blazers' current six-game road trip.

San Antonio. Houston. New Orleans. Milwaukee. Cleveland. Chicago. Who wins this race?

Which city ranks as a negative on a scale of 1 to 10?

Which city is middle of the road, but easy to get in trouble in?

Which city ramps up the “creepy” factor?

We won’t spoil it, but you can take a listen for yourself in the latest episode of Talkin’ Blazers with Channing Frye. The discussion starts around the 19 minute mark. 

But don’t forget, Utah nightlife is undefeated. Nothing beats Salt Lake City on the road.

Talkin’ Blazers Podcast: Should Carmelo Anthony start for Portland?

Talkin’ Blazers Podcast: Should Carmelo Anthony start for Portland?

Buckle up, ladies and gentlemen!

Former Trail Blazer and NBA Champ Channing Frye has some opinions about Carmelo Anthony reportedly set to join the Blazers.  

The Talkin’ Blazers Podcast duo of Frye and Dan Sheldon discussed freeing Melo and so much more on this week’s podcast.

Frye shared his thoughts on the Trail Blazers starting lineup and how the rotations should work once Anthony suits up for Portland:

 "I would start Nassir Little. Because I don't want Carmelo out there in the first unit because there's not enough shots for him to be productive... He's a stand still shooter... And defensively, he's not guarding four men in this league anymore. His biggest threat is his offensive firepower."

Not only could the second unit use Anthony’s shot making ability, but Blazers head coach Terry Stotts expressed after Little made his debut on Wednesday night vs. the Raptors that he “felt like it was worth taking a look at” Little in the starting lineup. And Stotts believes "it is easier for a young guy to be out there with the starters and blend in."

Melo doesn’t need to blend in. In fact, he’d probably prefer leading the second unit and feeling like he has the ultimate green light to get more shots up because the Blazer bench has struggled to be productive on the offensive end thus far this season.

You can listen to the full podcast below:

Talkin' Blazers Podcast: Is Carmelo Anthony the difference-maker for Portland?

Talkin' Blazers Podcast: Is Carmelo Anthony the difference-maker for Portland?

It's Frye Day which means the latest Talkin' Blazers Podcast is here!

Big week for the Portland Trail Blazers (4-8) as the organization plans to sign former All-Star Carmelo Anthony.

NBA Champion Channing Frye and his Emmy Award-winning co-host Dan Sheldon discuss the Trail Blazers' signing of Anthony and what to expect when he takes the court. Plus, find out if Channing and Dan think Anfernee Simons a legit contender for "most improved player" and the best NBA cities for entertainment options.

Listen to the full podcast below:

MORE ON THE BLAZERS

HeadStrong: How Channing Frye emerged from the fog

Michael Rapaport: It's criminal that CJ hasn't been an All-Star yet

Dribble, dribble, dribble: What Shaq & Barkley think about Melo to Portland

Tom Haberstroh thinks the Blazers need work on screens, Channing Frye isn't sure Whiteside is the right guy

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Tom Haberstroh thinks the Blazers need work on screens, Channing Frye isn't sure Whiteside is the right guy

In his latest podcast, Tom Haberstroh says the Trail Blazers need work on setting on-ball screens in their offense and asks special guest, and Talkin' Blazers podcast host, Channing Frye to walk him through setting a good screen as a big man.

Here is Frye's response, which turns the conversation to Hassan Whiteside's roll on the offensive end:

"I think it's all about angles. For me, I was more of a pick and pop guy but when I did roll you have to make the defender on the guard go over the top of that screen to create space. Me personally, I just think Whiteside…I think he can give you a double-double every game, in that being said, I don’t think he impacts the game as much as he should if he had more of a motor… I just don’t know if those double-doubles equate to wins..."

Frye continues his thoughts on Whiteside and asks some important questions about his effort and productivity:

Is he going to have energy on defense? Or is he just going to be big?... Does he set a screen or is he just rolling a little bit? Is he rolling hard to get the ball even though he knows he’s not going to get it? Is he creating opportunities for his teammates? Or is he just doing it because that’s the play?

Trail Blazer fans cannot overlook the importance of Whiteside's play this season, especially with the recent loss of Zach Collins. Whiteside was clearly brought in to buy time until Jusuf Nurkic returns at some to be determined point in 2020. In the interim, Whiteside needs to contribute at both ends and needs to be a threat offensively (via ball screens or otherwise) as teams try to take Damian Lillard out of the offense, much like Toronto did on Wednseday night. 

You can listen to the entire Habershow Podcast below where they talk about a variety of topics including load management, Frye's NBA career, the best shooters he played with, the Blazers pick and roll and more:

 

Headstrong: How Channing Frye emerged from the fog

Headstrong: How Channing Frye emerged from the fog

The month of November is Men's Health Awareness Month. ‘The Movember Foundation’ uses November to bring awareness to various men’s physical and mental health issues, as well as support to those tackling prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health, and more.

Throughout this month, NBC Sports will be releasing numerous videos that feature sports superstars discussing the importance of mental health as well as how they approach the subject. Former NBA star, and former Portland Trail Blazer Channing Frye, was one such athlete that participated in the nationwide project.

Sometimes I’d go sit outside on the porch, play some sad music, kill two bottles of wine, and just cry for hours

- Channing Frye

Channing Frye is a mountain of a man. At seven feet tall and 255lbs, he hardly blends in. That size, coupled with his skills on the court, earned him a long career in the NBA. Fans tend to look at athletes as super-human, but that just isn’t the reality. While Frye was shining in the bright lights on the NBA's biggest stage, he was in a dark space on the inside. As he put it, he was in a fog, a space where nothing made him happy:

When you’re in the league, or you’re a professional player, you really feel immune to a lot of things. But for me at that time, I felt like I just had a weight on my chest. I felt like there was no reason to smile. No reason to get up in the morning.

Frye was dealt a blow at the beginning of the 2016-17 NBA season that left him reeling. The Indians were hosting the Cubs in the World Series when Frye got a call that his mom's health was taking a turn for the worse. He immediately flew to California to be with her, and she passed away shortly thereafter. A few weeks later, Frye got the news that his father had also passed away.

After my mom passed, that was like a swift kick to the nuts. Then, like getting elbow dropped by Macho Man Randy Savage, was when my dad died on Thanksgiving.

This series of events left Frye in that fog he talked about. He struggled to get out to bed, struggled to find motivation, and struggled to smile. But Frye eventually reached a place where he realized he couldn’t continue his downward spiral and needed help to get his mind back on track.

It took a lot for me, not only to have some self-awareness to say you need to get help to stop going in the circle, but to be like, hey, you can’t do this alone.

Frye opened up about his battle with depression and mental health in an article with The Players' Tribune. Mental health never used to be a thing athletes talked about. It was something they bottled up inside, afraid of the stigma associated with going public. But times have changed, and more and more athletes are coming forward because they know they can’t fight the battle alone.
 

You can hear more from Channing Frye in the video above.

Talkin' Blazers Podcast: How do we feel about the Trail Blazers three-guard lineup?

Talkin' Blazers Podcast: How do we feel about the Trail Blazers three-guard lineup?

Trail Blazers head coach Terry Stotts has been experimenting with some three-guard lineups this season that include the usual two in Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum and adding second-year guard Anfernee Simons into the mix. 

Normally, only two of the three would be on the floor at the same time but the trio got run in both of the last two games. 

In the latest edition of the Talkin' Blazers podcast with Channing Frye and Dan Sheldon, the topic of the three-guard lineup came up. Frye weighed in with a pretty strong stance on the grouping and the rest of the rotations:

Can you play that lineup (Dame, CJ, Ant) for more than six minutes? Heck no. Because it’s just a free reign to the basket. I think those guys (Dame, CJ) get tired holding that mode offensively. They took 46 shots between the two guys (vs. LA)… We need more from (Mario) Hezonja, we need more from Rodney Hood. The iso Rodney Hood game, I don’t know if we’re going to need that…They need a 3 and D Rodney Hood. Now I don’t know if that’s him…can he evolve into that?

Coach Stotts talked about the unique lineup during a media availability on Friday and described the quandary of wanting to have all three of them on the floor at the same time: 

They’re three guys that can all create their own shot, shoot threes… If [the opponents] have a big guy at three, that’s usual the dilemma.

A dilemma indeed, and one that Coach Stotts and his staff are going to have to toy and wrestle with throughout the early parts of the season as the Trail Blazers utilize more small ball lineups with Zach Collins, Pau Gasol and Jusuf Nurkic all sitting out with injuries with unknown return dates. 

On the latest Talkin' Blazers Podcast, in addition to the three-guard lineup, Channing and Dan discuss load management and if it should be applied to Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard, if PEDs are a big issue in the NBA, who is going to step up in Zach Collins' absence and they make predictions for the upcoming Blazers schedule. Plus, Channing explains to Dan how he plays Overwatch while watching basketball.

Listen to the full Talkin' Blazers podcast below:

Talkin’ Blazers Podcast: What does life without Zach Collins look like?

Talkin’ Blazers Podcast: What does life without Zach Collins look like?

This week former Trail Blazer and NBA Champ Channing Frye along with Emmy award-winning sports broadcaster Dan Sheldon sat down to talk about a number of different topics including, playing a three-guard lineup, what life is going to be like for the next four months without staring power forward Zach Collins, and much more on the latest episode of the Talkin’ Blazers Podcast. After having shoulder surgery earlier this week, Collins will now be evaluated in four months.  

Blazers head coach Terry Stotts has inserted Anthony Tolliver in at starting power forward.

But as Sheldon asks Frye, “is he the indefinite solution?”

“He can’t be,” Frye said. “That’s just not his role. Tolliver is a great change of pace forward center, shooter.”

Frye believes Portland just has to get through the next couple of months by leaning on their backcourt duo of Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum.

And here is Frye’s advice for the team:

“You gotta just stay afloat. Stay around .500 and hope that CJ gets out of this little funk, Dame gets a chance to not play 40 minutes per night, and that [Hassan] Whiteside continues rebounding and playing at a high-level.”

The former Blazer forward believes at the moment Tolliver is going to have to fill the starting role.

“There’s no other option (in the short term),” Frye said. Stay afloat…stay afloat. Just get into the playoffs. At the end of the day, you’re going to have to win a road game in the playoffs… they’re a dangerous team.”

On the latest Talkin' Blazers Podcast, in addition to Life without Zach Collins, Channing and Dan discuss load management and if it should be applied to Portland Trail Blazers guard Damian Lillard, if PEDs are a big issue in the NBA, the three-guard lineup and make predictions for the upcoming Blazers schedule. Plus, Channing explains to Dan how he plays Overwatch while watching basketball.

Listen to the full Talkin' Blazers podcast below:

Channing Frye joins NBCS Northwest for new Trail Blazers podcast!

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Channing Frye joins NBCS Northwest for new Trail Blazers podcast!

Coming soon to a podcast near you!

Former Portland Trail Blazer and NBA champion Channing Frye will join our NBC Sports Northwest crew to co-host our new Talkin’ Blazers Podcast. Frye will join Emmy Award winner Dan Sheldon, from Rip City Mornings (weekdays from 6-9 am on NBC Sports Northwest) on this weekly podcast released every Friday throughout the NBA season. The podcast will debut this week on November 1st. 

“We’re excited to have Channing join the NBC Sports Northwest team,” said Diane Penny, SVP and GM, NBC Sports Northwest. “Channing had a very long and successful NBA career and has proven to be an insightful and thoughtful voice. As a former Trail Blazer with strong roots in the Portland community, Channing’s background and perspectives will bring a new connection with our fans.” 

A former NBA champion in 2016 with the Cleveland Cavaliers, Frye brings NBA experience as well as a background with the Portland Trail Blazers organization (2007-09) paired with opinions beyond the court such as Portland life, culture and community now that he lives in the area.

Check back soon on our Podcast page for more info and new episodes!