Jody Allen

If the Blazers are ever for sale, Larry Ellison would probably be first in line

If the Blazers are ever for sale, Larry Ellison would probably be first in line

Barely a week goes by when I don’t get a call, email or text advising me of a rumor involving the possible or pending sale of the Portland Trail Blazers. And before we get any further, I will tell you that word from the franchise, from the top down, has repeatedly been that the team is not for sale and that deceased former owner Paul Allen’s sister, Jody Allen, is not interested in selling at this point.

I respect that.

But, I would offer that it probably wouldn’t be good business to advertise that the team is for sale. Such things create uncertainty among players and other employees that may not be conducive to a winning environment. Players, especially, are very much interested in a team's owner and particularly his commitment to winning and spending money to do so.

In fact, when Paul Allen bought the team from Larry Weinberg on May 31, 1988, it came as a complete surprise. Nobody had any idea the team was even on the market until Allen showed up for the news conference.

There is little doubt, if the franchise were to be put on the market, who would be the early odds-on favorite to buy it. That would be Larry Ellison, the co-founder of Oracle Corporation. Ellison has attempted to buy three NBA teams, the Golden State Warriors, New Orleans Pelicans and Memphis Grizzlies.

And if he bought the Blazers, he would become the richest owner in the NBA, surpassing the Clippers’ Steve Ballmer by about $15 billion. Ellison’s net worth has been estimated at $64.5 billion, which would make him the sixth-richest person in the world. He financed the winning sailboat in the 2010 America's Cup and actually crewed on that craft. He is also a licensed pilot who owns fighter jets.

He is said to own the sixth-largest yacht in the world and it has a basketball court on it. ESPN once described him as “the craziest human this side of Mark Cuban” and “Cuban to the fifth power.”

I'm not sure if that's good or bad.

Of course this is all just speculation. Ellison has attempted to buy teams previously and failed and nobody knows if the Trail Blazers will ever be placed on the market.

But if they are…

 

CJ McCollum, team culture carry Trail Blazers to Western Conference finals

CJ McCollum, team culture carry Trail Blazers to Western Conference finals

DENVER – This amazing, incredible Sunday afternoon triumph – Trail Blazer owner Jody Allen called it “gritty” in her passionate speech to the Trail Blazers in their locker room – that vaulted Portland into the Western Conference finals against Golden State was a long time coming.

And it had so much to do with the team’s culture, its pride and its unwillingness to quit. And oh yes, CJ McCollum was other-worldly. And staff, front office, coaches – everyone there in the team’s family – was celebrating hard in the locker room and its vicinity when it ended.

“It speaks to the character of our organization and what we’ve become,” said Damian Lillard, after his team rallied from a 17-point second-quarter deficit to beat the Nuggets 100-96. “Obviously, we had the roster turnover four years ago and everybody was quick to shoot us down, count us out.

“And at that point, we didn’t know for sure what direction we were going to go in. But we definitely leaned on the culture that we wanted to create – doing things the right way, working hard, being about each other, not being about one guy or two guys. I think we really built that up from the jump. And to have that, it takes everybody – not just the players. You’ve got to have the coaches, the training staff, the front office, the security, everybody who is with us there every day. The PR staff – everybody we see every day.

“Everybody is invested in what we created,. I think when we come out on top in game like this, a tough series like this, you see it in everybody’s celebration.

“It’s exciting because we all play a part in it. You don’t just create this type of thing with just the players. It takes everybody to be all in. And that’s what it was tonight.”

Lillard was only 3-17 from the field but had 10 rebounds and eight assists to go with 13 points. McCollum carried the heavy scoring burden with 37 points on 17=29 shooting and he added nine rebounds.

But as Lillard said, even when Rodney Hood was lost for the game with a hyper-extended knee, the team got major contributions from Zach Collins, Enes Kanter, Evan Turner and Meyers Leonard.

Leonard, who arrived in Portland the same season as Lillard, was visibly emotional in the locker room.

“Emotional and happy,” he said. “This is surreal, man. This is seven years in the making. I was just talking to Dame. We were horrible our rookie year, then we were a 50-win playoff team two years in a row, then we decided to blow it up. We continued to bring in guys who wanted to work, who were good people, who were true professionals, who understood what we wanted.

“Then we go to the second round, then we get swept by the Warriors, then we get swept by New Orleans. All with the same team – almost the same people. Yet, we came out on the other end of it that much better. And that’s the most amazing thing about this team.

“We’ve added some guys but this has been an incredible run. But we’re not done yet. I’ve said this, I had a quote the other night, people from the outside looking in don’t know about this locker room and what we’ve been through.

“Every single guy is ready to play at any given moment. Every single guy wants the next guy to do well. And this has been a special run and this is a special team. There’s just been a lot of things that have happened – us getting swept, Mr. Allen’s passing, Nurk’s injury, I can go on down the line. There’s just been things that you would have thought would have knocked us out, that we would have thrown in the towel.

“But we haven’t. I would tell you, I’m a big communicator on the bench,. And I’ve never been around a group of guys that believes so much. And I’m a big believer, also.

“Even when we were down 17, I wasn’t worried because this is just a special team and guys that know how to get it done. It’s unbelievable.

“Maybe in the morning I will wake up and understand what happened but you should have seen us – staff, front office, coaches, players, everybody from top to bottom so happy for each other. This is a truly special team and special organization.

“People care and people work together. (Jody Allen) spoke really well. She was passionate, told us how immensely proud she is of us, the way we played with heart and determination and grit, that she’s proud to be a part of it.

“I thought that was pretty special considering everything that’s happened.”

Bert Kolde has been a part of the organization since his friend, Paul Allen, bought the team in 1988. Allen lost his battle with non-Hodgkins lymphoma in October and his sister, Jody, took over at the helm of the team.

“It’s been a legendary playoff run,” Kolde said after leaving the locker room celebration. “A magic carpet ride. And I feel that Paul’s spirit is watching over us. It’s special. It feels really special.”

Portland caught up with the Nuggets at the end of the third quarter and took a brief one-point lead but Denver led by a point heading into the final quarter, when the winners outscored the Nuggets 29-24.

McCollum had a chase-down block of a breakaway layup after Seth Curry went low to force the shot up high and that was a big play in the period.

“He put it right there for me and I just went and got it, ‘Bron-style,’” McCollum said. “Shout-out to my guy Bron (LeBron James). It was a mini-version of LeBron’s block on Iggy a few years ago. It’s something we will remember forever. I might have to get a picture of that one.”

Turner iced the game with two clutch foul shots with eight seconds on the clock.

“Pressure can cut pipes or make diamonds,” Turner said later. “So we never thought we were going to lose or anything like that.”

Ahead are the defending champions, the Golden State Warriors, in a series that beings Tuesday in Oakland. But I doubt the Trail Blazers will be intimidated.

“Jody told the team, it’s been a great season – SO FAR,” Kolde said with a smile.

Her late brother couldn’t have said it any better.

Is it possible Terry Stotts would decline extension and let his deal expire?

Is it possible Terry Stotts would decline extension and let his deal expire?

There are major decisions looming for the Portland Trail Blazers. For ownership, front office and the coach.

The Trail Blazers are looking at a chance to win their 50th game of the season tonight against Memphis. And once again, Portland will have exceeded the win projections of a lot of people for the season.
ESPN projected a miss-the-playoffs 43 wins for the Trail Blazers. Las Vegas’ Westgate SuperBook put the number at 42.5.

And this came a season after Portland captured the No. 3 seed in the Western Conference. That’s a lot of recent success.

I believe a lot of people would see the Trail Blazers as overachievers – and a team that is well-coached. When you maximize your talent, that’s usually a sign of quality coaching.

Coach Terry Stotts has certainly developed a winning culture and a winning system – even with the loss of two starters this season, the team has continued to play well and play hard.

But a decision on Stotts’ future is near. After this season, he has a year left on his contract but it’s a team option, which is exercisable five days after the team’s last playoff game. In other words, it's a one-way deal, with Stotts coming back if the team wants him or ... well, or not -- which would seem impossible.

His assistant coaches, it is believed, are on contracts that expire after this season and it would be difficult for the franchise to lose any of them. It’s a quality staff.

Understand that Stotts has faced this situation twice before and each time the team picked up the option and then extended his deal.

But this time could be different.

The NBA has seen what he’s accomplished in Portland this season and last. He’s going to be in demand much more than he’s ever been in his career.  He could take the lack of an offer (or the size of the offer) of an extension as a lack of respect and be determined to test the free-agent waters next summer. Or he could just be yearning for a change of scenery.

In this situation I think a lot of teams would choose to tie him up long term, as soon as possible. So far, that hasn’t happened here and there’s always a chance he could sit back, coach through the extension and move on.

Team options have never been popular with coaches or players – but they take them because they usually come with attractive salaries. When Stotts signed his last extension it was reported the contract averaged $5 million per year.

That’s great money but in the context of the coaching salaries in the NBA, it doesn’t even place him in the top half. Certainly the success of the last two seasons will bring a much higher salary – wherever he coaches.

Jody Allen, the team’s new owner, will soon have a decision to make about her coach. And Stotts, too, will have a decision.

Even if/or when an extension is offered, would he take it? Or would he gamble on himself next season and see what the market for his services would be next summer?

Stotts, asked about his situation Monday, adamantly refused to comment on it.

Neil Olshey, the team’s president of basketball operations, will presumably be in on the Stotts decision, too. He also declined comment.

But Olshey may also be in line for an extension. He, too, could be in demand around the league because of his team’s success. He does have one more year on his contract than Stotts.

These are big decisions, and they could be very-expensive, franchise-altering decisions. And I haven't even mentioned that super-max contract Damian Lillard is almost certain to qualify for this summer.