NFL Combine

Will former Beavers QB Jake Luton replace Tom Brady?

Will former Beavers QB Jake Luton replace Tom Brady?

Teams at the NFL Combine are known for asking some eyebrow-raising questions to their prospects during the pre-draft process. This week, former Oregon State quarterback Jake Luton was caught off guard when asked one loaded question from a New England Patriots scout: “How would you replace Tom Brady?”

Did the scout really just ask how Luton, a potential late-round pick, how he would replace a quarterback who has won six Super Bowls with the Patriots? Yes, yes he did. 

The 6-foot-6, 224-pound Luton said the question surprised him, mainly because it is such a tough question to answer. However, he did not back off from the idea of replacing the G.O.A.T in New England.  

“I said that’s tough,” Luton said. ”Those are big shoes to fill. But for me I’m a pretty even-keel guy. I kind of reiterated that. I said I’m going to be consistent; I’m going to be prepared as best as I can be, and I’ve never let any of the outside noise distract me. I don’t think that that would be an issue.

I bring it every day and prove that I’m a leader. No matter if it’s a high or a low, I’m going to keep doing it every day. However, that pans out; I’m not going to be worried about filling anybody’s shoes if I’m doing the best that I can do.

A big question looms for the Patriots: Will Brady play in New England next season? If he decides to join another team, it would end a historic run for New England that included six Super Bowl championships, the most of any player in NFL history. It does seem a little interesting that the Patriots are asking this question. Do they expect him to leave?

Whether Brady comes back this season or not, the Patriots need to invest in their future at quarterback. Luton is projected to be a late-round selection or priority free agent come April. In 2019, he completed 62 percent of his passes for 2,714 yards and 28 touchdowns with just three interceptions through 11 games. 

He was named “National Comeback Player of the Year,” but will heir to Brady be his next title? One thing is for certain: Luton will be as prepared as he can be if Bill Belichick gives him a call. 

Oregon OL Jake Hanson transforms body, showcases strength at NFL Combine

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Oregon OL Jake Hanson transforms body, showcases strength at NFL Combine

It appears Jake Hanson’s training for the NFL Draft is paying off. 

The former Oregon offensive lineman completed a total of 33 reps overall during the bench press at the NFL Combine on Thursday. The bench press is a test of strength where players attempt to get as many reps as possible. 

Here's a look at Hanson's bench press performance: 

According to Oregon football, Hanson's 33 reps are the second-most by an Oregon offensive lineman at the combine. The current record for bench press is held by Oregon State’s Stephen Paea, who had 49 in 2011.

Rather than play in any of the college all-star games, like his teammates Justin Herbert and Calvin Throckmorton, Hanson decided to focus on his training right away. He began working out at O-Line Performance in Phoenix, Arizona and weighed in at 303 pounds at the NFL Combine this week,11 more pounds than he did at the start of his training

You can read more about Hanson's draft stock, as well as his strengths and weaknesses, as he prepares for the NFL Draft in April in our NFL Combine profile here

How and when to watch the Oregon Ducks at the NFL Combine

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USATI

How and when to watch the Oregon Ducks at the NFL Combine

A record-tying seven former Oregon standouts will take part in this week’s 2020 NFL Scouting Combine at Lucas Oil Stadium. The seven Oregon participants equal the program’s most set three other times in 2007, 2012 and 2015.

[RELATED]: Justin Herbert wants to prove he's a competitor at NFL Scouting Combine

A program record six offensive players will represent Oregon over the first part of the week, highlighted by Rose Bowl MVP and projected first round QB Justin Herbert. The six offensive players is tied for the fourth most from one program at this year’s event. Oregon is also one of four programs with three or more offensive linemen at the combine.

HOW TO WATCH

The NFL Network and NFL.com are providing live coverage of on-field drills Thursday, February 27 to Sunday, March 1. The coverage will begin at 1 p.m. PT on Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and 11 a.m. on Sunday.

OREGON PARTICIPANT DETAILS & SCHEDULE

Name                                       On-Field Day          Pos.                 Jersey #                  Group #
Jacob Breeland                       Thursday                   TE                     TE02                           1
Justin Herbert                         Thursday                   QB                    QB07                          2

Juwan Johnson                        Thursday                   WR                   WO31                         3

Jake Hanson                             Friday                        OL                     OL17                          4

Shane Lemieux                        Friday                        OL                     OL28                          5

Calvin Throckmorton              Friday                        OL                     OL48                          5

Troy Dye                                   Saturday                    LB                     LB14                           9

Sunday, February 23

·         TE Jacob Breeland – Arrive in Indianapolis, orientation and interviews

·         QB Justin Herbert – Arrive in Indianapolis, orientation and interviews

·         WR Juwan Johnson – Arrive in Indianapolis, orientation and interviews

Monday, February 24

·         TE Jacob Breeland – Measurements, medical pre-exam, x-rays, orientation and interviews

·         QB Justin Herbert - Measurements, medical pre-exam, x-rays, orientation and interviews

·         WR Juwan Johnson - Measurements, medical pre-exam, x-rays, orientation and interviews

·         OL Jake Hanson – Arrive in Indianapolis, x-rays, orientation and interviews

·         OL Shane Lemieux – Arrive in Indianapolis, x-rays, orientation and interviews

·         OL Calvin Throckmorton - Arrive in Indianapolis, x-rays, orientation and interviews

Tuesday, February 25

·         TE Jacob Breeland – Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

·         QB Justin Herbert – Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

·         WR Juwan Johnson - Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

·         OL  Jake Hanson – Measurements, medical pre-exam, orientation and interviews

·         OL Shane Lemieux - Measurements, medical pre-exam, orientation and interviews

·         OL Calvin Throckmorton - Measurements, medical pre-exam, orientation and interviews

·         LB Troy Dye – Arrive in Indianapolis, x-rays, orientation and interviews

Wednesday, February 26

·         TE Jacob Breeland – Bench press (2:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

·         QB Justin Herbert – Bench press (12:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

·         WR Juwan Johnson – Bench press (12:30 or 1:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

·         OL Jake Hanson - Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

·         OL Shane Lemieux - Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

·         OL Calvin Throckmorton – Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

·         OL Troy Dye - Measurements, medical pre-exam, orientation and interviews

Thursday, February 27

·         TE Jacob Breeland – Will not participate in on-field drills.

·         QB Justin Herbert – On-field drills (Vert/Broad Jump – 2 p.m., 40-yard dash – 2:30 p.m., Position Drills – 3:30 p.m., 3-Cone/Shuttle – 5 p.m.)

·         WR Juwan Johnson – On-field drills (Vert/Broad Jump – 3:30 p.m., 40-yard dash – 5 p.m., Position Drills – 6 p.m., 3-Cone/Shuttle – 7:30 p.m.)

·         OL Jake Hanson – Bench press (12:30 or 1:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

·         OL Shane Lemieux – Bench press (12:30 or 1:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

·         OL Calvin Throckmorton – Bench press (12:30 or 1:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

·         LB Troy Dye – Media interviews, medical examinations, testing and interviews

Friday, February 28

·         Jake Hanson – On-field drills (40-yard dash – 1 p.m., Position Drills – 1:30 p.m., Vert/Broad Jump – 2:30 p.m., 3-Cone/Shuttle – 3:30 p.m.)

·         OL Shane Lemieux – On-field drills (Vert/Broad Jump – 2 p.m., 40-yard dash – 2:30 p.m., Position Drills – 3:30 p.m., 3-Cone/Shuttle – 4:30 p.m.)

·         OL Calvin Throckmorton – On-field drills (Vert/Broad Jump – 2 p.m., 40-yard dash – 2:30 p.m., Position Drills – 3:30 p.m., 3-Cone/Shuttle – 4:30 p.m.)

·         LB Troy Dye – Bench press (2:30 p.m.), psychological testing, NFLPA meeting and interviews

Saturday, February 29

·         LB Troy Dye – On-field drills (Vert/Broad Jump – 3:30 p.m., 40-yard dash – 4:30 p.m., Position Drills – 5:30 p.m., 3-Cone/Shuttle – 6:30 p.m.)

How Jake Luton's injury-ridden past paved way to NFL Combine

How Jake Luton's injury-ridden past paved way to NFL Combine

Overcoming adversity is a part of Jake Luton’s journey.

The former Oregon State quarterback overcame a thoracic spine injury in 2017 and a sprained ankle in 2018 to help pilot the Beavers to their first five-win season since 2014. His determination earned him the 2019 Mayo Clinic Comeback Player of the Year award, a prestigious honor which recognizes a player who battled injury or illness.

The award speaks volumes of Luton’s tenacity. His injury-plagued past isn’t just a part of who he is, but also who he's become. 

At the NFL Scouting Combine on Tuesday, Luton talked about how the game of football has taught him perseverance, something he has experienced first-hand in his collegiate career at Oregon State.

“I’ve had my share of getting knocked down,” Luton said. “I just keep getting back up. I keep fighting. I think that’s something that will help me in this process. I think team’s will see that and see that I have the ability to —I’m a fighter.”

In his “comeback kid” season in 2019, Luton started 11 games, throwing for 2,714 yards while completing 62.0 percent of his passes. He was named Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year on two occasions and appeared on the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm and Maxwell Award watch lists.

Luton completed his career at Oregon State playing 23 games with 21 starts and finished his career fifth all-time with 42 passing touchdowns and 5,227 passing yards. 

He reflected on his final year with the Beavers and credited then second-year coach Jonathan Smith with the team's mounting success.

“He’s gonna turn that around,” Luton said of Smith. “I think we proved it this year. We kind of got the ball rolling. Would have liked to get a few more wins than we got, but just to make the strides that we did. They have a lot of great guys in that system. I think they’ll kind of keep taking that next stride and I’m excited to see them work.”

In his career at Oregon State, Luton played 23 games with 21 starts and finished his career fifth all-time with 42 passing touchdowns and 5,227 passing yards.

He is now ready to carve his path amongst the future of the NFL, starting at the combine. He'll use the pre-draft process to prove his rousing success in college can be carried into his professional football career.

The 6-6, 224-pound quarterback has already gained the attention of teams like the Texans and Patriots, who reportedly pulled him aside for informal interviews this week. Now, he just has to do what he's been doing since the 2017 season, be patient, trust the process and persevere.

And if Luton's name gets called in April, he will be ready. 

"I’m going to be prepared as best as I can be," Luton said. "I’ve never let any of the outside noise distract me, so I don’t think that would be an issue. I’d bring it every day and prove that I’m a leader, no matter if it’s a high or a low. Keep doing it every day, however that works out." 

"I’m not going to worry about filling anyone’s shoes. Just doing the best that I can do.”

Justin Herbert wants to prove he’s a competitor at NFL Scouting Combine

Justin Herbert wants to prove he’s a competitor at NFL Scouting Combine

Former Oregon quarterback Justin Herbert knows he has a lot to prove before the NFL Draft on April 23.

He needs to showcase his versatility at quarterback. He needs to demonstrate how quickly he can take information from his meetings to the field. And he needs to prove to teams that despite the fact he’s never been the prototypical natural-born leader, that won’t matter.

But of all the areas Herbert wants to show teams at the NFL Scouting Combine this week, it’s his competitive nature he hopes to put on full display.

“I want to come out here, I want to do everything,” Herbert told reporters on Tuesday. “Have fun, get better, learn, I think it’s all about the long haul. Anything that I can do to extend my game is what I’m going to do.”

On his list of “everything,” Herbert confirmed he will throw during NFL Scouting Combine Drills. This will give him an opportunity to showcase his robust arm strength and improve his draft stock in the pre-draft process.

Herbert won’t fit into the clichéd mold some teams are looking for at the combine, but he will likely be scooped up by a team looking for the next face of the franchise. His arsenal of skills and his high football IQ, however, won’t guarantee that he’ll start on an NFL team from Day 1. Herbert may not even be ready to play immediately.

"I've never played a down in the NFL,” Herbert said. “I couldn't tell you what the speed of the game is like. I've watched as much as I could and I feel confident with my abilities but I've never played in the NFL before, so to give you an answer whether I could play right now, I don't think that would be in my best interest."

Herbert played four years at Oregon, throwing for 3,471 yards, 32 touchdowns and six interceptions on 66.8 percent completion across 14 games for the 12-2 Ducks. His last game at Oregon was a 28-27 win over Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. He was recently named MVP at the Senior Bowl in January.

Herbert is currently projected to be the third quarterback taken off the board come April behind LSU’s Joe Burrow and Alabama’s Tua Tagovailoa, but when it comes down to it, Herbert says he'll just be satisfied to hear his name called. 

“Anywhere I go, I’ll be happy,” Herbert said. “I know that sounds cheesy and politically correct, but it’s true.”

Oregon WR Juwan Johnson confirms he's a physical specimen at NFL Combine

Oregon WR Juwan Johnson confirms he's a physical specimen at NFL Combine

Anyone who has seen Oregon wide receiver Juwan Johnson take the field before knows he’s a big dude.

At 6-foot-4, 230 pounds, Johnson is one of the largest wideouts at the NFL Combine this year and his measurables prove it.

According to the NFL Draft’s official Twitter, Johnson led all wide receivers in longest arms, longest wingspan and largest hands. 

Johnson transferred to Oregon from Penn State in 2019, but injuries derailed his Ducks career early on. He went on to appear in 10 of Oregon’s 14 games, catching 30 passes for 467 yards and four touchdowns. He helped lead the Ducks to a victory in the Rose Bowl. His 66 yards were the most of any player on either team.

Johnson's large body frame and ability to shield defenders makes him a valuable asset to scouts looking for bigger types at the wide receiver position.

While his onfield portion of the combine will likely gain attention, the bench press will be perhaps his most anticipated event. The receiver recently announced he’ll be using the NFL Combine bench press to raise donations for Uplifting Athletes, a charity that assists the rare disease community. He hopes to raise $2,000 by completing at least 14 reps during the bench press.

Johnson joins quarterback Justin Herbert, tight end Jacob Breeland, linebacker Troy Dye, as well as offensive lineman Calvin Throckmorton, Jake Hanson and Shane Lemieux in one of the largest classes of draft hopefuls the Ducks have ever had participate in the NFL Combine.

NFL Combine profile: Oregon QB Justin Herbert

NFL Combine profile: Oregon QB Justin Herbert

Justin Herbert

Position: Quarterback
Year: Senior 
Hometown: Eugene, Oregon

Measurables: 

Height: 6’6 2/8" 

Weight: 236 pounds

Hand: 10"

Arm: 32 7/8

Wingspan: 78 7/8

Broad jump: 10-3

Vertical jump: 35.5

Official 40-yard dash time: 4.68

Overview

When quarterback Justin Herbert chose to forgo the NFL Draft in 2019 and return to Oregon for his senior year: his aspirations were clear. He had unfinished business with the Ducks.

One year later, Herbert is one of the premier quarterbacks in the illustrious 2020 NFL Draft class and is coming off a stellar finish to his four years with the Ducks. The Eugene native led Oregon to a 12-2 record, a Pac-12 championship and a Rose Bowl victory. The pre-draft process is off to a solid start for the 6-foot-6, 225 pound quarterback, who was named Senior Bowl MVP.

Herbert has all the tools needed to become a franchise quarterback, but presents some consistency issues that we will talk about below that bring concern to NFL scouts.

Draft projections

Most mock drafts have Herbert as the third quarterback to be selected in the NFL draft class. Pro Football Focus, NFL.com's Bucky Brooks, Sporting News, Bleacher Report’s Matt Miller and CBS Sports’ Ryan Wilson all believe Herbert will be selected with the No. 6 overall pick held by the Los Angeles Chargers.

NFL comparison:

Andrew Luck and John Elway

Strengths

- Protypical size
- High football IQ (4.01 GPA)
- Big time arm with quick release
- Pocket presence
- Ability to use his legs

Weaknesses

- Doesn’t keep his eyes up to extend plays
- Inaccurate throws due to improper setting of feet
- Oregon’s first-read offense limited the amount of progressions to one side of the field for Herbert

Former Oregon Ducks LB Justin Hollins' stock could be ready to soar

Former Oregon Ducks LB Justin Hollins' stock could be ready to soar

Stop! Listen. Hear that buzz? That's the sound of anticipation and excitement surrounding Justin Hollins.

The former Oregon linebacker entered the NFL Draft process as an intriguing, 6-foot-5, 248-pound ultra athletic prospect with many questions surrounding his pro potential including, what is he? An undersized defensive end or an out-of-place linebacker?

After a strong showing during the practices leading up to the East-West Shrine Game last month, and then delivering an MVP-caliber performance as a linebacker, Hollins' name is on the rise. He could give it another jolt on Sunday when he works out at the NFL Scouting Combine. 

"He's an exceptional, exceptional athlete," Hollins' agent Frank Bauer said. "He's very smart. And he has everything they want. The height. The weight. The long arms. The long body. And the key ingredient is he is able to run like a deer."

Hollins will have a chance to prove his athletic prowess in Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Ind., when linebackers and defensive linemen, including former teammate Jalen Jelks, take the field on Sunday for a series of drills, including the all-important 40-yard dash.

For Hollins, who arrived at Oregon in 2014, being one of four Oregon players selected to participate at the combine is both exciting and "a blessing."

Now, he said, it's time to "do my thing."

Back to that in a bit.

One can't fully appreciate where Hollins is now in his career without knowing where he's been. 

Hollins arrived at Oregon in 2014 as a 3-star recruit listed at 6-foot-6, 205 pounds. He played mostly special teams for the 2014 team that reached the national title game where the Ducks lost to Ohio State. 

Hollins got injured the following spring and ended up redshirting in 2015. He returned to action in 2016 only to see Oregon change defensive coordinators from Don Pellum to Brady Hoke and also change schemes, shifting from the 3-4 to the 4-3. That led to Hollins moving to defensive end where he ended up starting. He led all Ducks' linemen with 51 tackles, but at 240 pounds was woefully undersized to excel at that position. 

"I knew after my first year in college that if I ever wanted to go to the NFL I'd be an outside linebacker," Hollins said. "So the whole position change got underneath my skin a little bit. But it didn't really affect my train of thought. I just kind of did what I had to do."

Oregon went 4-8 that season in large part because of one of the worst run defenses in the nation. That fact certainly wasn't all on Hollins, but teams certainly did take advantage of running the ball at him given his lack of bulk for the defensive end position.

The poor season led to the firing of coach Mark Helfrich and the entire staff. New coach Willie Taggart took over and hired Jim Leavitt to run the defense and he implemented the 3-4 scheme.

Nobody on the team was more pleased with that development than Hollins, who as a redshirt junior was ready to thrive. 

He put up 59 tackles with 11 1/2 for loss in 2017 and followed up with 14 1/2 tackles for loss in 2018 to go along with 64 tackles and five forced fumbles.

Clearly, Hollins became an NFL prospect along the way. But he also remained somewhat of a mystery, a tweener, not big enough to play defensive end in the NFL (or college, for that matter) and maybe not agile enough to play linebacker  and cover professional running backs and tight ends. 

The predraft process provided Hollins with a chance to establish who and what he is all about. 

Hollins - who has been working out at Mamba Sports in Thousand Oaks, Calif., and Athletic Gaines in Los Angeles, Calif., and had a chance to meet Mamba's co-owner, former Los Angeles Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant - took advantage of his first big predraft opportunity leading up to the East-West Shrine game.

There, Hollins demonstrated against elite competition that he could indeed play outside linebacker in either the 4-3 or the 3-4 at the next level and he backed up a strong week of work by earning defensive player of the game with 10 tackles, two sacks and three for loss.

"I was able to make plays and showed my strengths," Hollins said.

People took notice.   

"He went to that East-West Shrine Game and was asked to play more of a traditional, stand up linebacker role, and his athletic ability really caught the attention of some of the people therem," said Rob Rang, draft analyst for NFLDraftScout.com

That showing set the table for the combine where Hollins could further elevate his stock by running a strong time in the 40-yard dash and delivering good numbers in other drills, as well.

Hollins ran track and field in high school in Arlington, Texas, where he posted a time of 10.6 seconds in the 100 meters, but that was when he weighed well below the 248 pounds he is now. Still, both Rang and Bauer expect Hollins to run very well on Sunday. If he does, with his size, the hype train should begin to accelerate.

"I learned a long time ago from [former Oakland Raiders owner] Al Davis, speed kills," Bauer, of Sun West Sports in Stockton, Calif., said. "If he runs well, he's only going to move up."

Someone that tall, and that fast, with long arms could create plenty of havoc in the NFL. Rang said that Hollins' five forced fumbles are huge in the eyes of NFL scouts.

"That was number two in the country," Rang said. "NFL teams are just enamored with pass rushers that can create turnovers."

Hollins said he believes his strengths are his speed and ability to read plays. He is also self aware enough to recognize his flaws. Hollins said he must work on his ability to bend and remain low.

"Sometimes I get caught playing high," he said. "Like when I'm tired I tend to stand up a little bit more instead of bending at my hips and my knees to keep my leverage. That's my main weakness. But I'm working on it everyday."

A concern for him as a linebacker would be if Hollins could perform well in coverage in the NFL.

"I definitely have to work on that but it's not like if I step out there I'll feel uncomfortable covering anybody," he said. "But I know that I have a lot to improve on when it comes to that aspect of the game."

Hollins had been projected to be a middle-round pick until the East-West Shrine Game buzz began. Now, Rang said he could see Hollins going as high as the second or third round. However, one NFL Scout said what Hollins does at the combine will be a greater measuring stick. NFL teams, the scout said, will want to see if he has the ability to develop into a strong pass rusher at the next level. 

"He needs to develop more rush savvy with moves and counters," the scout said. "He doesn't show a lot of that."

At this point, Hollins said he doesn't care what scheme he ends up playing in and isn't too caught up in what round he ends up being selected.  

"I want to go as high as I possibly can," he said. "But getting picked up will just be a blessing for me and I'll just be happy about that, honestly."

Hollins said he's sought combine advice from a few former Oregon Ducks, such as former UO offensive lineman Tyrell Crosby and defensive lineman Tony Washington.  

"They said it's going to be a grind but it's going to be a fun one," he said. 

Bauer, of course, believes his clients stock is on the rise. 

"People are all talking about him being one of the guys that's on the move," Bauer said.

Rang has certainly become enamored with the Ducks' prospect. 

"People are going to be so intrigued by what he brings," Rang said. "There's a perception that he still has untapped potential. Of the Oregon Ducks, he is the one that's going to have an up-arrow next to his name when the process if over, I believe."

Now, Hollins has to deliver on the biggest scouting stage in the world. 

NFL scout and a draft expert evaluate Oregon Ducks LB Justin Hollins

NFL scout and a draft expert evaluate Oregon Ducks LB Justin Hollins

Maybe the most intriguing Oregon prospect at the NFL Scouting Combine being held at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Ind, is linebacker Justin Hollins. 

At 6-foot-5, 248 pounds, and possessing unique speed for a man his size, Hollins has a chance to wow scouts at the combine and elevate his draft stock in a league that instantly becomes enamored with players that have both unique size for their position and elite athleticism. 

Hollins and defensive end Jalen Jelks workout on Sunday. Wide receiver Dillon Mitchell took the field today. Cornerback Ugo Amadi works out on Monday. 

Here is the third installment in a series of four individual breakdowns of each former UO player by an NFL Scout and draft analyst Rob Rang of NFLDraftScout.com. The NFL Draft (April 25-27): 

PLAYER: Justin Hollins, linebacker, 6-foot-5, 240-pounds. 

NFL Scout says: "Let's see if he’s big enough and fast enough to come off the edge. He flashes on tape and then you won’t see him do much for a while. Then it's, 'who made that play? Oh, it’s No. 11.' How fast is he? How strong is he? How big is he? How will he interview? He needs to develop more rush savvy with moves and counters. He doesn't show a lot of that. Not the biggest guy in the world." 

Preliminary round prediction: Fifth or sixth. 

Rob Rang (@RobRang) says: "Hollins to me is the one that I think is going to be the first Oregon Duck drafted. I did not expect to say that half way through the season, even toward the end of the season...But when he went to that East-West Shrine Game and was asked to play more of a traditional stand up linebacker role, and his athletic ability really caught the attention of some of the people there. He's 6-6, 250 and watch, he is going to end up running in the 4.5s. He can fly...There's a perception that he still has untapped potential. I have some reservations that he could be a bit of a tweener. He's not big enough to play defensive end and not quite agile enough to play linebacker. But he is going to workout so well, that somebody is going to convince themselves that they can make him into a linebacker."

Preliminary round prediction: Third round. 

Fentress says: "Full disclosure Part 2. Just like with Jelks, I've been a big fan of Hollins' talents since his redshirt freshman season. It drove me nuts when the Ducks moved to the 4-3 in 2016 and forced Hollins to play defensive end at 240 pounds. When Oregon returned to the 3-4 defense in 2017 Hollins' talents began to flourish. He has a chance to become a starter in the NFL as a linebacker in either the 3-4 or the 4-3. The question is, can he cover? Straight-line speed won't be an issues. Agility in space could be. We shall see. If he can't cover well, then he might end up being an edge rushing specialist. Whatever Hollins is asked to do, he has the talent to stick in the NFL for awhile. If he runs well this weekend, he might end up going higher than expected."

Preliminary round prediction: Fourth. 

Upcoming: Amadi (works out Monday).

Posted: Dillon Mitchell (worked out Saturday) and Jalen Jelks (works out on Sunday). 

NFL scout and a draft expert evaluate Oregon Ducks DE Jalen Jelks

NFL scout and a draft expert evaluate Oregon Ducks DE Jalen Jelks

The NFL Scouting Combine is in full swing at Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Ind, where four Oregon Ducks will be working out for NFL Scouts. 

Taking the field Saturday will be wide receiver Dillon Mitchell. Hitting the field on Sunday will be defensive end Jalen Jelks and linebacker Justin Hollins. Cornerback Ugo Amadi works out on Monday. 

Here is the second installment in a series of four individual breakdowns of each former UO player by an NFL Scout and draft analyst Rob Rang of NFLDraftScout.com. The NFL Draft (April 25-27): 

PLAYER: Jalen Jelks, defensive end, 6-foot-6, 245-pounds. Led Pac-12 defensive linemen with 57 tackles. Had 29 1/2 tackles for loss and 15 sacks for his career at Oregon.

[ALSO READ: Jalen Jelks: Splash or slip at the NFL Combine]

NFL Scout says: "Depending on athletic ability, he could maybe go as high as late second to late third. That will probably be his window. Has good height and length. Disruptive. Plays with good motor and competitiveness. A little thin and light. Depending on how you use him, he could be susceptible to getting overwhelmed by teams running right at him. Showed a lot of versatility in different alignments. Pass rush guy, initially. If he adds bulk he could become an every-down guy." 

Preliminary round prediction: Second to third. 

Rob Rang (@RobRang) says: "Entering the year, I had Jelks ahead of Hollins. Jelks is bigger and broader. He has strong hands. But at the same time, like Hollins, he is a little bit of a tweener. I do not expect Jelks to show quite the same agility in terms of changing direction laterally that Hollins will. The week of practice that I saw (at the Senior Bowl), he flashed, but he certainly did not dominate...I think that Jelks is more in that fourth to fifth round range. He's a good player but I don't know if he is the stud that maybe his production and his name suggests. I'm a little bit higher on Hollins than I think some people are and a little bit lower on Jelks than some people are."

Preliminary round prediction: Fourth to fifth. 

Fentress says: "Full disclosure, I've loved me some Jalen Jelks and Justin Hollins since their redshirt freshmen seasons. Their potential has always stood out to me and here they are on the verge of entering the NFL. Jelks did well as a 3-4 defensive end in Oregon's system but he clearly fits best as a 4-3 end in the NFL unless a team tries him out at linebacker in a 3-4. But I question whether he has the coverage skills to be able to pull that off. He does need to add some weight, which he should. Remember that former UO defensive end Dion Jordan bulked up from 245 to 280 in the NFL and still maintained his pass rushing abilities. Jelks could do the same. I could see him getting up to 260 and becoming a legit edge rusher. The NFL is always starving for pass rushers and Jelks, if he doesn't become a star, should at least be adequate enough in that area to remain in the league for several years."

Preliminary round prediction: Third. 

Upcoming: Hollins (works out Sunday) and Amadi (works out Monday).

Posted: Dillon itchell (works out on Saturday).