Oregon basketball

Red flags and stress: NBA analyst says pass on Bol Bol

Red flags and stress: NBA analyst says pass on Bol Bol

The highest-rated basketball player to ever sign with Oregon who seemed to have come and gone in a blink of an eye. With the NBA Draft right around the corner, there are some hot takes on Bol Bol.

It’s easy to see why Bol is one of the most intriguing players in the 2019 NBA draft: 7-foot 2 centers with 7-foot-8 wingspans with terrific outside shooting (52 percent from three) don’t come along often. In his nine games with the Ducks, he led the team in points (21.0 per game), rebounds (9.6) and blocks (2.7).

However, Rob Dauster of NBC Sports is saying to pass on the former 5-star recruit who has been pegged as a boom-or-bust prospect. Here are the red flags:

Bol’s measurements

Bol weighed in 208 pounds, the same weight as Duke’s 6'8" Cam Reddish. He also was listed at 7.1 percent body fat, one of the highest percentages measured. On the 2018-19 Oregon basketball roster, Bol was listed as 235 pounds before his season ending foot injury. It’s highly possible Oregon rounded up on his weight, so it doesn’t necessarily mean that the 18-year-old has dropped almost 30 pounds. However, NBA teams will want to see him get stronger and put on more weight.

Who will Bol be able to guard in the NBA?

“For someone that can be such a high-level rim protector when he wants to be, Bol is just a terrible defender. In an era where versatility and positionless basketball has become king, the saying you’ll hear in coaching circles is, “You are who you can guard,” says Dauster.

“He also has nowhere near the footspeed or lateral quickness to be able to defend anyone on the perimeter. The idea of asking him to switch a pick-and-roll and try to stay in front of any NBA guard will cost his coaching staff next season at least two hours of sleep every night before a game.”

Durability/Endurance

Durability is the biggest issue that surrounds Bol as he joined a large group of seven-footers with foot problems. He has dealt with various injuries throughout his basketball career and questions will linger until he’s back on the court.

“If his conditioning was an issue playing just nine games at the college level, will he be able to handle the rigors of an 82-game season while carrying 250-260 pounds in an ideal world?” says Dauster.

Work ethic

How much does Bol like basketball? Work ethic and mentality concerns have loomed around Bol since coming out of high school. At Oregon, sometimes he’d float on the perimeter and shy away from contact. How hard is he willing to work to develop into the best NBA player he can be?

“He needs to live in the weight room for his first two or three seasons in the NBA. When he’s not in the weight room, he needs to be in the practice gym, learning how to play and where to be on the defensive side of the ball,” says Dauster.

 

Bol’s talent was undeniable during his short stint in green and yellow. But did he display enough of his immense potential before the season ending injury to wipe away the red flag durability concerns?

Bol’s ceiling is high as a floor-spacing, rim-protecting big man. But does his potential for stardom outweigh the possibility of a bust? And if so, which team will roll the dice on his unique skillset?

A lot of questions and not many answers… Stay tuned for more as the 2019 NBA Draft begins June 20.

Payton Pritchard makes smart decision to return for senior season at Oregon

Payton Pritchard makes smart decision to return for senior season at Oregon

Payton Pritchard has withdrawn from the NBA Draft and will return to the Oregon men’s basketball program for his senior season, he announced on his Instagram.

The deadline to withdraw from the 2019 NBA Draft is today, May 29th, and according to multiple reports, the decision was last minute due to interest from an NBA team.

The West Linn native took command of the Ducks in their inspired late season run to the NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 run, garnering warranted attention.

With much thanks to Pritchard, the Ducks won their final 10 of 11 games, including the Pac-12 Tournament. In that stretch, the point guard averaged 15.8 points, 4.0 rebounds, 5.3 assists and 2.3 steals. He also earned the Pac-12 Tournament’s Most Outstanding Player honor.

He decided to test the NBA waters but Pritchard was not invited to the NBA Combine, isn’t on ESPN’s board for the top 100 players for this year’s NBA Draft or on any mock drafts I could find.
Returning to Oregon puts him in a position to raise his draft stock and makes him a possible candidate for Pac-12 Player of the Year.

Pritchard enters his fourth season as UO's starting point guard to a team that looks vastly different from last season. The program lost seven scholarship players; two seniors moved on, three players left the program for the NBA Draft and two Ducks have transferred.

[RELATED: Concerns surround Oregon forward Kenny Wooten’s NBA readiness]

UO has a total of six eligible players on the roster for this season. Pritchard is one of three Ducks coming back from last season; rising-sophomores Francis Okoro and Will Richardson also are back.

The Ducks add a top 15 recruiting class including signees CJ Walker, Chandler Lawson and Chris Duarte and are in pursuit of several transfers.

Don't fret Ducks fans, next season is not lost. The Ducks can still find success and make a postseason run with Pritchard’s return, Dana Altman as head coach, a strong incoming class and the team buying into elite defense. However, with the mass exodus, Oregon will once again need to find its centerpiece star. 

 

Concerns surround Oregon forward Kenny Wooten’s NBA readiness

Concerns surround Oregon forward Kenny Wooten’s NBA readiness

The 2019-20 Oregon men’s basketball roster is currently looking pretty sparse. The Ducks team that pulled off an inspired late season run to the NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 has largely dispersed.

Two seniors moved on, three players left the program for the NBA Draft and two Ducks have transferred.

The latest Duck to fly away? Shot-blocking phenom, Kenny Wooten.

On Sunday night, Wooten took to Instagram to announce he will forgo his junior season and stay in the NBA Draft.

Wooten’s decision is an interesting one and of course he could still change his mind, ultimately he has until May 29 to declare for the NBA Draft or return to Oregon.

The 6-foot-9 rim protector’s athleticism is undeniable. In his two seasons at UO, Wooten ranks third all-time in Oregon history for blocked shots with 166, earning back-to-back All-Pac-12 Defensive team honors. His defensive contributions late in the 2018-19 season propelled Oregon’s push to win the Pac-12 Tournament and dance to the Sweet 16.


So is he trying to strike while the iron is hot? Wooten has not returned a message seeking comment and the school has not confirmed a final decision from Wooten.

NBC Sports NBA Draft Analyst Rob Dauster would advise Wooten to return to school. 

“The concern I have is two-fold,” Dauster said. “For starters, if he’s not catching and dunking, he really can’t do anything offensively. He had 33 assists in 70 college games. That’s fine when you’re Clint Capela, but - and I don’t have official measurements for him yet - Wooten is roughly three inches shorter or so.”

“The other question is if he’s going to end up being as defensively versatile as someone like Jordan Bell. You watch what Jordan does in this Golden State defense, and he’s switching and trapping and swarming and all over the place on the perimeter in addition to being the athlete/dunker/shot-blocker. I don’t know if Wooten can do all of that. I think he’s far less mobile and fleet a foot.”

Wooten was not invited to the NBA Combine and isn’t on ESPN’s board for the top 100 players for this year’s NBA Draft.

Of course, Wooten can develop and improve his weaknesses at the professional level, but it appears that would likely happen in the NBA G League or as a two-way player.

“He is 21 already, so if he wants to start earning money, I get it, I just think that coming back, adding some semblance of an offensive repertoire and improving on where he struggles defensively could get him to a point where he could get a guaranteed contract in next year’s draft,” Dauster said.

“But, frankly, that isn’t a guarantee either.”

Since the exodus of Ducks from the program, Oregon has yet to add a player eligible to play this season. UO has only three players from last year’s team (if senior Payton Pritchard comes back) with a total of six eligible scholarship players (Duquesne transfer Eric Williams must sit this year).

I don’t doubt coach Dana Altman, who has become a wizard at piecing rosters together in crunch time. However, if Wooten changes his mind and has a consistent junior season exemplifying offensive growth and defensive versatility… It’d be beneficial for Oregon and likely Wooten’s draft stock.

Bol Bol’s mind-boggling measurements at NBA Combine

Bol Bol’s mind-boggling measurements at NBA Combine

Oregon star Bol Bol is regaining some attention he lost after not playing since December due to a season-ending foot injury.

It’s easy to see why Bol is one of the most intriguing players in the 2019 NBA Draft; the center officially measured in at 7-foot-2 and 1/4 inches with his shoes on and recorded having a 7-foot-7 wingspan and a 9-foot-7 and 1/2 inch standing reach (WHOA!) at the NBA Combine.

Once drafted, Bol will be the third tallest active player behind 76ers center Boban 

Marjanovic (7'3 1/2") and Mavericks' Kristaps Porzingis (7'3). His standing reach is half an inch short from tying the NBA Combine record of 9-foot-8.
Bol’s height and standing reach weren’t the only eye-catching numbers he posted at the NBA Combine. Bol weighed in 208 pounds, the same weight as Duke’s 6'8 Cam Reddish. He also was listed at 7.1 percent body fat, the highest percentage measured so far.

On the 2018-19 Oregon basketball roster, Bol was listed as 235 pounds before his season ending foot injury. It’s highly possible Oregon rounded up on his weight, so it doesn’t necessarily mean that the 18-year-old has dropped almost 30 pounds. However, NBA teams will want to see him get stronger and put on more weight.

Bol has not been cleared and will not compete in the testing events at the combine. On Tuesday, he told TNT that he was three weeks away from being cleared fully.

Will he be a lottery selection or has his draft stock slipped? Here is where mock drafts predict Bol will be selected in the 2019 NBA Draft.

The highest-rated basketball player to ever sign with Oregon seemed to have come and gone in a blink of an eye. A former five-star recruit, in his nine games with the Ducks he led the team in points (21.0 per game), rebounds (9.6) and blocks (2.7) while showing off his terrific outside shooting (52 percent from three).

Bol Bol a lottery selection? Latest NBA mock drafts for Oregon Ducks

Bol Bol a lottery selection? Latest NBA mock drafts for Oregon Ducks

The ping pong balls have landed! The New Orleans Pelicans were the surprise winners of the NBA draft lottery and first chance at Duke star Zion Williamson. Now that the lottery results are final, let’s take a look at landing spots for potential Pro Ducks.

BOL BOL: The highest-rated basketball player to ever sign with Oregon who seemed to have come and gone in a blink of an eye.

It’s easy to see why Bol is one of the most intriguing players in the 2019 NBA Draft: 7-foot 2 centers with 7-foot-8 wingspans and terrific outside shooting (52 percent from three) don’t come along often. In his nine games with the Ducks, he led the team in points (21.0 per game), rebounds (9.6) and blocks (2.7).

[READ: Bol Bol, worth the gamble?]

Did he display enough of his immense potential before the season-ending injury to wipe away the red flag durability concerns? Will the 7-foot-2 center be a lottery selection or has his draft stock slipped? The consensus among mock drafts is that he will be a first round draft pick.

8th pick: Atlanta Hawks select Oregon center Bol Bol (Bleacher Report)

17th pick: Brooklyn Nets select Oregon center Bol Bol (SB Nation)

10th pick: Atlanta Hawks (from Dallas Mavericks) select Oregon center Bol Bol (NY Post)

17th pick: Brooklyn Nets select Oregon center Bol Bol (Sports Illustrated)

22nd pick: Boston Celtics select Oregon center Bol Bol (NBC Sports)

LOUIS KING: The 6-foot-9 forward’s draft stock certainly climbed through Oregon’s run in the Pac-12 and NCAA tournaments after scoring in double-figures in each game and being named to the Pac-12 All-Tournament team. But how far?

[READ: Oregon Ducks won't rule the basketball world without its King]

The five-star recruit has been listed as the No. 36 prospect in the draft by ESPN. Most mock drafts are first round only and do not have King listed, the consensus is that he will be selected in the second round.

38th pick: Chicago Bulls (from Memphis Grizzlies) select Oregon forward Louis King (Sports Illustrated)

30th pick: Milwaukee Bucks select Oregon forward Louis King (Mass Live)

Bol and King are among 66 players invited to this year’s NBA Combine, held May 16-17 (Noon-4 p.m. PT, ESPN2) at Quest Multisport in Chicago. Interestingly, King has decided not to work out in the five-on-five games and the combine.

Neither Payton Pritchard or Kenny Wooten (who also declared for the NBA draft and testing the waters) are currently listed as a potential draft pick on any mock draft I could find. Most likely, it'll be all eyes on Bol and King. 

The deadline for players to withdraw from the draft and return to school is June 10.

[READ: Big decision time: Four Oregon Ducks enter NBA draft]

Oregon basketball loses another player: Miles Norris seeking transfer

Oregon basketball loses another player: Miles Norris seeking transfer

Another opening just freed up on the Oregon basketball roster for next season.  

6-foot-10 forward Miles Norris is leaving the program and has entered the transfer portal, as first reported by 247 Sports.

The departure means Oregon has six open roster spots from last season. The Ducks are still piecing together their 2019 recruiting class

The four-star recruit flashed his great potential during his freshman season. He played in 27 games for the Ducks, averaging  3.3 points and 1.9 rebounds per game in 10.5 minutes per game. He scored a career-high 14 points in Oregon's Pac-12 Tournament first round victory over Washington State. 

After that he saw his minutes decrease in the NCAA Tournament; playing one minute against Wisconsin,three minutes against UC-Irvine and not playing in the Sweet 16 game against Virginia.

Oregon basketball loses another player this offseason: Victor Bailey Jr.

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US Presswire

Oregon basketball loses another player this offseason: Victor Bailey Jr.

Oregon sophomore Victor Bailey Jr. is transferring, according to multiple reports. The 6-foot-4 guard averaged 7.4 points, two rebounds and shot a team-best 39.8 percent from three-point range. He averaged 19.1 minutes with eight starts in 37 games last season, but his playing time faded off, only playing five minutes in Oregon's first two NCAA Tournament games. Bailey did not play vs. Virginia in the Sweet 16.

Bailey's departure marks Oregon's fifth open scholarship spot. The Ducks are still piecing their 2019 recruting class together, but will also need to replace senior Paul White, senior Ehab Amin, freshmen Bol Bol and Louis King (intend to remain in the NBA Draft). 

This comes on the heel of Oregon missing out on two top recruiting targets: five-star point guard Cole Anthony and four-star guard Cassius Stanley. 

Anthony committed to North Carolina live on ESPN, he had Oregon in his final four. Anthony was the MVP of both McDonald's and Jordan Brand Classic, and had a strong showing at the Nike Hoop Summit.

Cassius Stanley committed to Duke on Monday. A commitment from Stanley and Anthony would have likely launched Oregon back into the discussion for a top-10 class nationally. Currently, Oregon’s 2019 class is ranked 12th nationally and third in the Pac-12 Conference. Here is where UO's 2019 recruiting class stands

[Official] Oregon basketball whiffs on Cassius Stanley; Where the Ducks stand

[Official] Oregon basketball whiffs on Cassius Stanley; Where the Ducks stand

Oregon basketball is still piecing its 2019 recruiting class together.

The Ducks whiffed on Cassius Stanley, who committed to Duke. The No. 29 player in the country is ranked No. 3 among combo guards, according to 247 Sports. Oregon was heavily pursuing Stanley, who originally narrowed his top three schools to UO, Kansas and UCLA, ahead of his visit to Duke last weekend, when he added the Blue Devils to the finalist list. 

During his announcement, Stanley praised Oregon as an “up and coming program” with “elite coaches” before selecting Duke.

A commitment from Stanley and consensus five-star combo guard Cole Anthony, would have likely launched Oregon back into the discussion for a top-10 class nationally.

Anthony is expected to make his college decision tomorrow. He’s narrowed the choices to North Carolina, Oregon, Georgetown and Notre Dame.

Oregon defensive lineman and the nation’s top football 2019 recruit, Kayvon Thibodeaux made his feelings known on Twitter.

Currently, Oregon’s 2019 class is ranked 12th nationally and third in the Pac-12 Conference after landing a big verbal commitment from transfer guard on Saturday.

After visiting Eugene for the Oregon spring football game, Duquesne sophomore guard Eric Williams, Jr. announced on Twitter that he committed to the Ducks will enroll at Oregon for next basketball season.

6-foot-6 Williams, who averaged 14 points and 7.6 rebounds per game this season, will sit out the 2019-20 basketball season and then be a redshirt junior for the 2020-21 season.

The Ducks have also landed commitments from junior college national player of the year candidate Chris Duarte and consensus four-star big man Isaac Johnson, who is expected to take a two-year LDS mission and won't be back in Eugene until 2021. Rounding out Oregon's 2019 class is two 6-foot-8, four-star prospects CJ Walker and Chandler Lawson. 

Meet the Ducks' latest basketball recruiter: Oregon WR Mycah Pittman

Meet the Ducks' latest basketball recruiter: Oregon WR Mycah Pittman

Oregon men's basketball is trying to land one of the nation's top high school athletes, four-star shooting guard Cassius Stanley.

Coach Dana Altman should thank Oregon freshman wide receiver Mycah Pittman, who is already fighing for a starting spot, for doing a little recruiting on Stanley's Instagram. Pittman wrote a simple "Sco (Ducks)" comment. 

Kansas, Oregon, and UCLA were originally Stanley’s top three schools. Ahead of his visit to Duke last weekend, he added the Blue Devils to the finalist list. 

The 6-foot-5, 180-pound guard out of Sierra Canyon High School (Los Angeles, California) will commit today at 12:30 p.m.. 247 Sports ranks Stanley as the No. 29 player in the country, No. 3 among combo guards and No. 3 in California. 

Glimpse of life without Sabrina Ionescu: Oregon WBB lands the nation’s top guard, Sydney Parrish

Glimpse of life without Sabrina Ionescu: Oregon WBB lands the nation’s top guard, Sydney Parrish

The future is so bright for Oregon women’s basketball, you might need to wear shades.

Okay that was a lame, overused pun.

Fresh off a Final Four run, the Oregon women’s basketball program has elevated it’s standard, discarded its “newbie” title among the nation’s elite and landed the nation’s No. 11 overall prospect and the No. 1 guard in the class of 2020, according to ESPNW.

Indiana-native Sydney Parrish committed to Oregon over Indiana, Iowa, Maryland, South Carolina, Tennessee and UCLA. The 6-foot-2 athlete is the first five-star prospect to commit to Oregon since Satou Sabally in the class of 2017 and the highest rated recruit to commit to Oregon since Sabrina Ionescu (No. 4 overall in 2016).

The Ducks are looking more like a perennial national contender by the minute. Expected to be the top-rated preseason team in 2019-20, Oregon returns most of its team including rising stars Sabally, Erin Boley, Nyara Sabally and a very-determined Sabrina Ionescu, who opted to stay at Oregon with one more accolade in mind; a national championship.

However, the Wooden Award winning Ionescu has only one year of eligibility left. As irreplaceable as the triple-double queen is, Parrish has all the tools to pick up and lead the Ducks when Ionescu turns pro.

"We're building something here in Eugene," Ionescu said in her Players Tribune letter. "We're building something — together — that's going to last for a long time after we've all graduated."

As a junior, Parrish averaged 21 points, 6.9 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.9 steals per game, leading Hamilton Southeastern School (Indiana) to its first-ever state championship and earning the Gatorade State Player of the Year award.

The elite guard is Oregon’s first verbal commitment for the 2020 class and Parrish plans on being an active recruiter for the Ducks.

She’s a skilled and versatile sharpshooter that clicked with coach Kelly Graves immediately.

“It didn’t feel like any other visit,” Parrish said to Prospects Nation.  “I didn’t feel like the coaches were trying to sell me on anything.”

Parrish and her family were taking spring break in Florida when the Ducks made the Final Four in Tampa Bay earlier this month.  Her parents surprised her with tickets and Parrish was able to watch her future team.