Oregon Football

Get to know Oregon’s newest wide receiver, Tabari Hines

Get to know Oregon’s newest wide receiver, Tabari Hines

Welcome to the flock. It was just last week that former Wake Forest star Tabari Hines announced his intentions to leave the Demon Deacons and take his talents to Eugene.

The 5’10”, 175lb wide receiver instantly helps bring some much needed talent and depth to Oregon’s receiving corps. Junior Dillon Mitchell had a productive 2017 for the Ducks, and hopes to build on that in 2018, but the rest of the group is young and unproven.

Hines looks to change that.

As a junior last season at Wake Forest Hines led the team with 53 receptions, and was third on the team with 683 receiving yards and seven scores.

To put that in perspective, Mitchell was the leader in two of those categories for Oregon last season, hauling in 42 receptions for 517 yards, while tight end Jacob Breeland led the team with five touchdowns. Hines would be number one in all three.

There is little doubt that Hines will make a difference on the field, but enough about that. Let’s get to know a little bit more about the newest Duck:

- Hines had narrowed his transfer options to Oregon, USC, and Texas before ultimately deciding on UO.

- Says players and the coaches really helped set Oregon apart.

- Thanks to all the jerseys, he says he actually watched a lot of Oregon football as a kid.

- How does he describe his new quarterback, Justin Herbert? Simply, “he’s the real deal.”

- Hine says he doesn’t know how to fish, but wants to learn how. This is the Pacific Northwest! It might be kind of hard to find someone to teach him, *wink*

- The emoji that best describes him? He says it’s the cool guy with the glasses.

Want to learn even more about the newest Duck? Be sure to tune into The Bridge tonight at 6PM for the full interview with Serena Winters and Bri Amaranthus.

And since Bri does call him a “hastag king,” it would serve you well to follow Hines on Twitter (@TabariHines) and Instagram ( @TabariHines1).

Former Oregon defensive coordinator Brady Hoke joins Panthers' staff

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Former Oregon defensive coordinator Brady Hoke joins Panthers' staff

Longtime college coach and former Oregon football defensive coordinator Brady Hoke is getting his first NFL job.

Hoke will be the Panthers’ defensive line coach, Alex Marvez of Sporting News reports.

The Panthers had an opening at the position because they promoted defensive line coach Eric Washington to defensive coordinator after Steve Wilks left to become head coach of the Cardinals.

Hoke is best known for his four seasons as head coach at Michigan. He’s also been the head coach at Ball State and San Diego State, and he finished last year as the interim head coach at Tennessee after spending most of the year as the Volunteers’ defensive line coach.

Helfrich hired as Chicago Bears offensive coordinator

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Helfrich hired as Chicago Bears offensive coordinator

Former Oregon head coach Mark Helfrich is headed to the NFL. The Chicago Bears have hired Helfrich to be offensive coordinator, Adam Schefter of ESPN reports. 

Helfrich will be coaching two of his former Oregon players, offensive linemen Kyle Long and Hroniss Grasu. 

"Beyond excited and thrilled to be working with Coach Helf again," said Grasu. "Love the guy and his family. We are very fortunate to have him."

Helfrich was the offensive coordinator of the Ducks from 2009-2012 and moved into the head coaching spot after Chip Kelly left for the Eagles. He won 33 games in his first three seasons and went to a national title game before being fired after going 4-8 during the 2016 season.

It was rumored that Kelly offered the UCLA offensive coordinator job to Helfrich. 

Jordon Scott named to freshman All-America team

Jordon Scott named to freshman All-America team

EUGENE, Ore. – Oregon defensive lineman Jordon Scott has been named to the 17th annual Football Writers Association of America Freshman All-America Team.

 

Scott (Largo, Fla. / Pinellas Park HS) finished his freshman season with 34 tackles, 4.5 tackles for loss and two sacks while starting 11 of Oregon’s 13 games. He had a season-high five tackles at Washington earning a spot on that week’s Pro Football Focus All-Pac-12 Team. Scott had multiple tackles in 11 games, including the last 10.

 

Scott, who was previously named the 247Sports True Freshman All-America Team, is the eighth Oregon player to be named to a FWAA Freshman All-America Team. He joins Haloti Ngata (2002), LaMichael James (2009), John Boyett (2009), De’Anthony Thomas (2011), Tyler Johnstone (2012), Royce Freeman (20014) and Troy Dye (2015).

 

Oregon receives Notice of Allegations from the NCAA

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Oregon receives Notice of Allegations from the NCAA

The Ducks are in hot water. The NCAA has alleged that the Oregon football, track and field, and both the men’s and women’s basketball teams committed rules infractions, some dating as far back as 2013.

The notice, which was received by the University on Monday, includes the following allegations:

  • In March 2016 an adjunct professor in the anthropology department “knowingly arranged for fraudulent academic credit or false transcripts” for a member of the women’s track and field team. Specifically, the professor changed the student’s grade from an F to a B-minus to ensure the student remained academically eligible to participate in athletics.

 

  • Multiple allegations state that during varying periods from 2013 to 2017 both the men’s and women’s basketball programs “exceeded the numerical limitation of four basketball coaches” by allowing members of the staff to participate in on-court basketball activities.

 

  • That coach Dana Altman was fully responsible for the previously stated violations by the men’s basketball program, and that Altman “did not demonstrate that he promoted an atmosphere for compliance and monitored his staff within the program due to his personal knowledge of and/or involvement in the violations”

 

  • That coach Kelly Graves was fully responsible for the previously stated violations by the women’s basketball program, and that Graves “did not demonstrate that he promoted an atmosphere for compliance and monitored his staff within the program due to his personal knowledge of and/or involvement in the violations” 

 

  • From August to November 2016 the football program “arranged personalized recruiting aids for 36 football prospective student-athletes during unofficial and official paid visits. Specifically, the football program created an electronic presentation that included each prospective student-athlete's name, physical attributes and high school highlight video and displayed it on a video board located in the football performance center."  

 

(READ THE FULL NOTICE OF ALLEGATIONS HERE)

The NCAA violation structure has four levels, with Level I being a “severe breach of conduct” and Level IV being “incidental issues.” All of the allegations levied against Oregon are considered Level II violations.

A Level II violation is considered a “significant breach of conduct.” According to the NCAA, Level II is described as “violations that provide or are intended to provide more than a minimal but less than a substantial or extensive recruiting, competitive or other advantage; includes more than a minimal but less than a substantial or extensive impermissible benefit; or involves conduct that may compromise the integrity of the NCAA collegiate model as set forth in the Constitution and bylaws.”

The University, which self reported all the infractions, has acknowledged the infractions took place, but doesn’t agree with the level of infraction to which the NCAA enforcement staff assigned.

“Coach Altman and coach Graves are committed to compliance with NCAA bylaws, they have the highest ethical standards on and off the court, and each acknowledges the infractions that took place within their programs,” said UO Athletic Director Rob Mullens. “In both cases, our monitoring program identified the issues and they were reported to the NCAA. We have addressed the matters with the responsible employees and enhanced compliance training within the department. These cases do not merit the level of charges against the coaches sought by the NCAA.”