PDP issues update on status of Terminal 2

pdp1129_1920x1080.jpg
Portland Diamond Project

PDP issues update on status of Terminal 2

The Portland Diamond Project (PDP) continues to work with the Port of Portland in hopes of securing a site for a future baseball stadium. Today, the PDP released some updated info as they continue to research the site and its baseball future. Below is the official press release from the PDP:

PDP Statement on T2 Extension:

Portland Diamond Project continues to evaluate Terminal 2 as the preferred site for a ballpark and mixed-use development. We have come to an agreement with the Port of Portland for up to six months of extensions to continue the due diligence period.

Port of Portland Statement:

The Portland Diamond Project asked for more time for due diligence at Terminal 2 and we feel comfortable extending the timeline.

Will Portland Diamond Project be paying the Port of Portland for the extensions?

Yes. PDP will pay the Port $37,500 for each month of additional due diligence.

When are the payments due?

PDP will pay the first Monthly Extension Fee in the amount of $37,500 on or before June 1, 2019 and will also pay five successive payments of the Monthly Extension Fee in the amount of $37,500 each, on or before the 1st day of July, August, September, October and November of 2019.

What happens when the six months are up?

At that point, we’ll enter next phase of cementing our partnership with the Port to develop this property.

Is PDP considering other sites?

We love the opportunity that Terminal 2 presents for a ballpark on the waterfront and a new neighborhood that extends the central city. We have an agreement to continue evaluating Terminal 2 and that’s where our energy is focused.

So, you’re considering other sites?

We’re focused on Terminal 2, but we’ll be pursuing all options that make sense until shovels are in the ground.

Portland Diamond Project reveals new renderings of proposed ballpark

3.jpg
Portland Diamond Project

Portland Diamond Project reveals new renderings of proposed ballpark

It’s been two years since the Portland Diamond Project came to fruition, so happy PDP Day!

In celebration of the project’s anniversary to bring a major league baseball team to Portland, the Portland Diamond Project released new stadium renderings of the Rose City's future ballpark. 

The MLB to PDX stadium features a retractable roof, gondola suite, and centerfield and home-plate plazas, among other features. The capacity of the ballpark is expected seat between 32,000 and 34,000 fans.  

Take a look:


In November, the project signed an agreement in principle to develop the Port of Portland’s 45 acre Terminal 2 Property as the future home for Portland baseball.

So far, the project has gained lots of traction from the Portland community. A petition to show MLB officials the need for a fanbase has gained over 30,000 signatures.

Celebrate PDP Day and the project's goal to bring Major League Baseball to Portland on Wednesday at the Portland Diamond Project store across the street from Providence Park.

Portland Diamond Project Q&A: What's new with MLB to PDX

Portland Diamond Project Q&A: What's new with MLB to PDX

Craig Cheek, President and Managing Director of the Portland Diamond Project, took over the PDXDiamondProj's social media account on Monday to talk MLB to PDX. 

Here’s a wrap-up of what Cheek, a former vice president at Nike who oversaw training, baseball and football operations, had to share from today’s Twitter Q&A.

On when the project will break ground: 

On when the Portland Diamond Project hopes the first home opener will take place:

On how likely MLB to PDX will happen on a scale of 1-100:

On potential transportation options to the ballpark:

On whether fans will be able to use boat transportation to access the ballpark:

On whether the stadium will be a hitters or pitchers park:

On potential sites for MLB spring training: 

On how Mariners fans will be accomodated in Portland:

On obstacles left to face: 

To stay tuned to all of the latest updates, head on over to @PDXDiamondProj on Twitter.

The MLB expansion could bring the Seattle vs. Portland I-5 rivalry to new heights

dtml2duv4aatzyl.jpg-large.jpeg
portland diamond project

The MLB expansion could bring the Seattle vs. Portland I-5 rivalry to new heights

If you have ever been to a San Francisco Giants vs. Los Angeles Dodgers baseball game, you may have noticed the intense rivalry feeling with the “beat L.A.” chants ringing in your ears.

Now imagine a similar feeling when attending the future I-5 rivalry between the Seattle Mariners and Portland…

The time can’t come soon enough. But let’s take a look at how the proposed MLB expansion from 30 to 32 teams will actually effect the league. 

According to Axios writer Kendall Baker, who was reminded from an article published one year ago, that an expansion would most likely bring new structure to the league, and more specifically dividing the 32 teams up into four divisions rather than just the American and National league.

"One proposal would be to geographically restructure into four divisions, which would create a major reduction in travel ... and add to the natural rivalries by not just having them as inter-league attractions, but rather a part of the regular divisional battles." (It would also likely mean every team would use a DH.)

Assuming that Portland and Montreal (the other location rumored to be a part of the MLB expansion) are in, let’s see the teams that would be listed in each division: East, North, Midwest, and West:

East: Atlanta Braves, Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds, Miami Marlins, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Tampa Bay Rays, Washington Nationals.

North: Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians, Detroit Tigers, Minnesota Twins, Montreal (Expos?), New York Yankees, New York Mets, Toronto Blue Jays.

Midwest: Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, Colorado Rockies, Houston Astros, Kansas City Royal, Milwaukee Brewers, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers.

West: Arizona Diamondbacks, Los Angeles Angels, Los Angeles Dodgers, Oakland Athletics, Portland, San Diego Padres, San Francisco Giants, Seattle Mariners.

So rather than the six divisions (AL East, AL Central, AL West, NL East, NL Central, and NL West), the league would have just four, limited long travel, and the space for rivalries to grow.   

 

Portland Diamond Project Q&A: The latest MLB to PDX news

Portland Diamond Project Q&A: The latest MLB to PDX news

Eight-year major leaguer Darwin Barney took over the Portland Diamond Project social media account this week to catch baseball fans up to speed with the latest on MLB to PDX.

Here’s a wrap-up of what Barney, who is an investor and advisor for the project, had to share from today’s Twitter Q&A.

On whether Portland would get an AL team, meaning a Portland-Seattle rivalry:

On which team would be most likely to relocate to Portland: 

On whether Barney could play for Portland's new team:

On whether MLB to PDX is for real: 

On who would likely be memorialized for the first bobble-head giveaway:

On what kind of beer will be served at the park: 

On what's next for the project: 

To stay tuned to all of the latest updates, head on over to @PDXDiamondProj on Twitter. 

Portland Diamond Project picks Terminal 2 site for future MLB Ballpark

Portland Diamond Project picks Terminal 2 site for future MLB Ballpark

The Portland Diamond Project Thursday made it official, its preferred site for a proposed baseball stadium in Portland is the Port of Portland’s Terminal 2.

The terminal is located on the Willamette River, north of the Pearl District. The media release from PDP:

PORTLAND DIAMOND PROJECT ANNOUNCES AGREEMENT IN PRINCIPLE WITH PORT OF PORTLAND TO DEVELOP TERMINAL 2 PROPERTY Portland, OR – November 29, 2018 – Portland Diamond Project (PDP), the organization behind the effort to bring Major League Baseball to Portland, today announced it has signed an agreement in principle with the Port of Portland to develop the Port’s 45-acre Terminal 2 property, according to PDP Founder and President Craig Cheek. “We believe this has the potential to be a transformative landmark project for this city,” Cheek said. “Building an iconic, state-of-the-art ballpark along the Willamette River will catalyze economic development and capture great views of both the urban scale of the city and regional character of the Pacific Northwest.” This letter of intent with the Port kicks off a collaborative process with the City of Portland, and local communities, to create a Major League Baseball ballpark and community destination.

“We're committed to building a sustainable, equitable, and accessible ballpark that reflects what makes Portland such a special place to live,” Cheek said. “That means outstanding locally sourced food and beverage amenities, environmentally sustainable construction and operations, opportunities for makers and small businesses, and an atmosphere that celebrates diversity and inclusion and is welcoming to all Portlanders.”  

Terminal 2, which for decades handled commodities such as steel rail, bulk ores, and other oversized international cargo, offers approximately 45 acres of riverfront property with more than 2,000 linear feet of waterfront. The site is located on N.W. Front Ave., just north of the Pearl District and rapidly evolving Slabtown.  

“For the past year, we’ve been highly focused on securing the best possible property for development of a ballpark and have deeply analyzed multiple sites,” Cheek said. “Although additional options continue to present themselves, we are excited to announce that Terminal 2 is our preferred location and want to thank the Port of Portland for being such a great partner in this vision.”

For more information visit http://portlanddiamondproject.com .

The latest updates in a Twitter Q & A with PDX Diamond Project

The latest updates in a Twitter Q & A with PDX Diamond Project

The Portland Diamond Project is hard at work looking for a potential stadium site to bring Major League Baseball to Portland.

While baseball fans in Portland are anxiously awaiting the project’s latest announcement, seven-time MLB All Star and project advisor Dale Murphy took to Twitter to answer your hard-hitting questions.

On goal for timing of a MLB team:

On how Portland would develop a FARM system:

On potential stadium sites:

 

Head on over to @PDXDiamondProj on Twitter to stay tuned to all the latest updates.

New "owner" Darwin Barney on MLB to PDX: "I would bet on it"

New "owner" Darwin Barney on MLB to PDX: "I would bet on it"

The Portland Diamond Project has added another notable investor to its group -- former major-league and Oregon State infielder Darwin Barney.

“The timing is real good for me,” Barney, who just spent his first summer in retirement after an eight-year major-league career with the Cubs, Dodgers and Blue Jays.  He was in spring training this year with the Texas Rangers but decided to walk away from the game. “I never envisioned being an owner of a major-league team but I never envisioned being a major-league player, either.

“You never know what your path is going to be, you just know what your passions are going to be. I quit playing to spend more time with my family. This came up just at the right time.”

Barney is very confident that the PDP is going to be successful in its effort to bring MLB to Portland.

“I don’t want to put a number on it,” he said. “We think the chances are really good. I would bet on it. We could be a part of history here.”

Barney starred on two national championship teams at Oregon State after a high school career at Southridge. He won a Gold Glove with the Cubs after tying the major-league record for consecutive errorless games by a second baseman.

He joins Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson and his wife Ciara as owners of the prospective team.

“We’ve really tried to bring a diverse group together,” Barney said. “With Russell and his wife we bring a lot of different platforms to spread the word."

“I’ve really been impressed with the leadership of this group,” he said. “They have the right people at the top. They get things done.”


 

MLB Ballpark improvement disputes may provide more targets for Portland Diamond Project

MLB Ballpark improvement disputes may provide more targets for Portland Diamond Project

As the Portland Diamond Project continues to close in on a location for a site for its mixed-use development that would include a major-league ballpark as its centerpiece, the list of potential targets for a team in Portland may be growing.

Two existing major-league cities are in the process of attempting to get government funding for ballpark improvements. Part of negotiations for such things almost always comes down to teams threatening to leave their stadiums for something better.

And as the PDP gains increasing credibility as a future destination for a team, expect this city to be used as leverage in negotiations in other cities with stadium issues. It's beyond the control of the Diamond Project and simply the way these things tend to play out.

And that may not be a bad thing for Portland. Not all those teams will get what they want and at a certain point, they may have their bluff called – and decide to move. And at the same time, any city providing leverage for existing teams would be looked upon favorably by Major League Baseball as a future expansion site.

To date, it was presumed that Portland has four opportunities for procuring a team – the two potential expansion franchises and the troubled franchises in Oakland and Tampa.

But don’t be surprised to hear this city mentioned as a possible relocation site for the Arizona Diamondbacks and – what? – the Seattle Mariners.

There are serious stadium-improvement issues with the latter teams.

In Seattle, the team’s lease at Safeco Field expires at the end of this season and the Mariners are asking King County for a substantial sum for ballpark improvements.

The Seattle Mariners have issued an ultimatum: Give them $180 million in taxpayer money for their 19-year-old stadium, or they won’t sign a long-term lease.

And in Phoenix, the Diamondbacks have already negotiated their way out of  longer-term lease to one that expires in 2022 – coincidentally a year when it’s figured the Portland ballpark would be ready for occupancy.

The Arizona Diamondbacks can leave Chase Field and end the team's 20-year residence at the downtown Phoenix stadium as early as 2022, Maricopa County leaders decided Wednesday.

The expectation is that both disputes will be settled without relocation of the franchises... but faced with a lucrative option in a fresh city, it would be difficult to know what to expect from ownership of those teams.

PDP leaders have promised that they will use no public money for stadium construction other than what has already been set aside by the Oregon state legislature.

The ballpark in Portland is expected to include a large-scale mixed-use development that includes housing, entertainment and dining options and hotels. The Diamond Peoject is still looking at multiple sites but is expected to make a decision on a location soon.

 

 

One on one with the newest investors in the Portland Diamond Project: Russell Wilson and Ciara

One on one with the newest investors in the Portland Diamond Project: Russell Wilson and Ciara

The Portland Diamond Project (PDP) added some big names to its investment group over the weekend. Seattle Seahawks star quarterback Russell Wilson and his wife, Grammy Award-winning singer Ciara joined the group as owners/investors.

The PDP held a press conference on Saturday where Wilson said, “we’re excited about this opportunity. We’re excited about the potential of bringing a Major League Baseball team here to such a great city.”

Wilson and Ciara took a quick second after the press conference for an exclusive interview with our Dwight Jaynes to talk about the duo’s ambition to bring MLB to PDX.