Utah Jazz

Hassan Whiteside isn't one of the league's best defenders, according to NBA coaches

Hassan Whiteside isn't one of the league's best defenders, according to NBA coaches

The Trail Blazers defense has struggled at times this season, but one person has been a standout from day one: Hassan Whiteside. 

Whiteside, who came over in an offseason trade with the Miami Heat, has done an incredible job filling in for the injured Jusuf Nurkic all season.

His very first night as a Blazer was a 16 point, 19 rebound performance against the Denver Nuggets on opening night. 

From there, he just kept climbing. 

Whitside is statistically having one of the best seasons of his career, averaging 16.3 points and career-highs of 14.2 rebounds and 1.2 assists per game.

Whiteside is the league's second-leading rebounder, trailing only Andre Drummond of the Detroit Pistons (15.2 rpg).

But where he is most untouchable is defensively at the rim. 

[Listen to the latest Talkin’ Blazers Podcast with hosts NBA Champion Channing Frye and Emmy Award winner Dan Sheldon]

Whiteside leads the entire league in blocks per game at 3.1. That is nearly a full block more than the two players tied for second, Anthony Davis and Brook Lopez (2.5 bpg). 

Whiteside has 187 blocks on the season, compared to 147 for Lopez and 138 for Davis. Both Lopez and Whiteside have played 61 games, while Davis has played 55. 

Regardless, you think the league's second-leading rebounder and leading shot-blocker would be recognized for their defensive prowess, right? You'd be wrong. 

Jon Krawczynski and Josh Robbins of The Athletic anonymously polled 33 NBA coaches, some head coaches, some assistant coaches, to get their expert opinions. 

The coaches had to vote for the first-team and second-team all-league defensive teams, while 23 of the coaches also voted on Defensive Player of the Year. 

The only rule was they had to vote for two guards, two forwards, and one center for the all-league teams. 

So, where did Whiteside fall?

He fell all the way out of the coaches consciousness. 

Whiteside did not earn first of second-team All-League Defense, he also was not named Defensive Player of Year. 

The really surprising part, however, is that Whiteside didn't even receive a single vote for any of the lists. 

How can the league's leading blocker not even receive a vote for All-League defense? 

According to the coaches' vote, Rudy Gobert was the Center on the first-team, and Bam Adebayo was the Center on the second team. Other centers receiving votes included Brook Lopez, Joel Embiid, Myles Turner, Tristan Thompson, Steven Adams, Andre Drummond, Jarrett Allen, and Domantas Sabonis. 

[READ THE ENTIRE LIST HERE]

As for the Defensive Player of the Year, the coaches picked Rudy Gobert, with Brook Lopez and Bam Adebayo being the only other centers to receive votes. 

Here is how Whiteside compares to those three centers:

HASSAN WHITESIDE: 16.3 ppg, 14.2 rpg (10.2 drpg), 3.1 bpg

RUDY GOBERT: 15.1 ppg, 13.7 rpg (10.3 drpg), 2.0  bpg

BAM ADEBAYO: 16.2 ppg, 10.5 rpg (8.0 drpg), 1.3  bpg

BROOK LOPEZ: 11.0 ppg, 4.5 rpg (3.8 drpg), 2.4  bpg

Whiteside averages more points (though that doesn't matter for defense), rebounds, and blocks than the three centers that made the list. The only category any of those centers beat Whiteside in is defensive rebounds, where Gobert averages 0.1 more per game... 0.1! 

When averaged out to a per 36, Whiteside leads in all categories.

HASSAN WHITESIDE PER 36: 18.7 ppg, 16.4 rpg (11.8 drpg), 3.5 bpg

RUDY GOBERT PER 36: 17.9 ppg, 14.5 rpg (10.2 drpg), 2.6 bpg

BAM ADEBAYO PER 36: 17.0 ppg, 11.0 rpg (8.3 drpg), 1.4 bpg

BROOK LOPEZ PER 36: 14.9 ppg, 6.0 rpg (5.1 drpg), 3.3 bpg

However, Whiteside lags behind all three of those players in overall defensive rating: Lopez (99.1), Gobert (106.8), Adebayo(107.7), Whiteside (112.2)

More telling is that his individual defense hasn't led to overall improvements in team defense.

The Bucks lead the league in defensive efficiency (101.6), Utah is 11th (108.8), and Miami is 14th (109.2). The Blazers fall near the bottom, ranked 27th (113.6).

While the Blazers' struggles on defense aren't Whiteside's fault, the numbers show he isn't necessarily helping either.

As for the coaches, they value how a player impacts and changes the team defense over a player's individual numbers. Based on individual numbers alone, Whiteside should be in the conversation with those other centers, not an afterthought.

Again, how does the league's leading shot-blocker not even receive a vote for all-league defense? 

Luckily for Whiteside, the Blazers have at least eight more games for him to put on a defensive show.

Ed Davis believes sitting out the NBA season is not the answer

Ed Davis believes sitting out the NBA season is not the answer

With NBA players sharing their thoughts on whether or not it is a good idea to resume the 2019-20 NBA season amid the Black Lives Matter protests and the social justice movements, former Trail Blazers fan favorite Ed Davis is voting for a return to the court.  

Last Friday, more than 80 NBA players hopped on a conference call to discuss any and all concerns and hesitations about resuming the season. The call was led by Nets guard Kyrie Irving, as reported by Shams Charania of The Athletic.  

A lot has come out of that Zoom call in the last few days. Ed Davis was one of the 80-plus players on the nearly two-hour-long meeting.
In a recent interview with Alex Kennedy of HoopsHype, Davis opened up about why he believes the players should take the court if and when the season resumes in Orlando.

The 10-year NBA veteran feels that not restarting this season could also have big implications on next season and for the future of younger NBA players.

I know a lot of guys are iffy about playing. But it’s sort of bigger than that because if we don’t play, I honestly think there’s a chance that we won’t play next year. I just had a 2-month-old so of course I don’t want to go away for two months, but it’s just something I feel that we have to do to save the league and for all the people who came behind us and all the people who are going to come after us. This is coming from a 10-year vet; I’m on the back end of my career and I’ve made enough money, so it’s not really about the money. It’s more about the future guys – a guy like Donovan Mitchell, who is looking at a $160 million dollar contract but he might only get $90 million if the cap drops. -- Ed Davis in a recent interview with HoopsHype 

And just because Davis is for playing in Orlando, doesn’t mean he isn’t still focused on the Black Lives Matter movement.

[Listen to the latest Talkin' Blazers Podcast with hosts NBA Champion Channing Frye and Emmy Award winner Dan Sheldon.]

Davis spent three seasons with Portland from 2015-18 serving as the backup big man and the spark plug off the bench. 

Davis mentioned in the HoopsHype interview that he and former Trail Blazers forward Maurice Harkless used to take time to bring Portland police officers and black children together during their time in Portland.

I think you have to look at it from every player’s own perspective. For me, personally, I’m for the Black Lives Matter movement. I’ve always been for it. When I was in Portland, me and Moe Harkless would go through the inner cities and really try to get involved in police reform. We’d bring black kids and the police together, trying to help them find some common ground and gain respect for each other. Like I said, I’m all for that. -- Former Trail Blazer Ed Davis

Davis believes bringing live sports back could have an even bigger and more positive impact on the country’s social justice movement.

“I mean, this is really the only time that you’re going to get that and it’s the only time you’re going to get 22 teams together for seven weeks, so we can really get down and meet every couple of weeks and do some really cool things.” Davis said.

“There’s some really great stuff that we can do for the world. I feel like all of us doing it together and working with the NBA and working with these owners, we can really help out. For me, I want to fight against police brutality. That’s my cause; that’s really what I want to focus on. I hope that when we get down there, we can do that together.”

The Jazz big man also mentioned that donating to black communities and various organizations that promote and advocate change is how he and others in the NBA can truly make a difference.

I’m looking at it like: With where we’re at as a Black culture and how we’re so far behind when it comes to black people and the wealth we have, the money we have, us missing the rest of this season (and possibly next year), we’re talking about billions and billions of dollars for the black community because a lot of guys in the NBA are black men from the inner cities and things like that. So, the way I look at it, we have to play for that simple fact. I saw Stephen Jackson say that we can’t play because it’s going to be a distraction. Yeah, it’s going to be a distraction, but we can take that money – those billions and billions of dollars – that we’re going to make and pour it back in the community. You can look at it like that – that us losing out on that money would hurt generations of people.

For me, I make $5 million a year and I’m taking a 25-percent pay cut [due to COVID-19], so I’m losing around $30,000 every two weeks. That’s hundreds of thousands of dollars, and that’s what is creating generational wealth and that’s what is really going to help the Black community. I don’t know if guys are looking at it like that. But, that’s just my perspective and the reason why I think we need to play. I get it, we need to take a stand; we got to do this, we got to do that. But you got to have money to do some of these things and make some of these things happen. -- Jazz big man Ed Davis

 

The 31-year-old has already made a living with his workhorse mentality in the league.

Davis realizes that as a role player and not a superstar, his situation and many others situations are a bit different from the likes of Kyrie or Dwight Howard. 

“It’s easy for a guy like Kyrie [Irving] to say that he’ll give everything back,” Davis continued. “But would he really give everything back? It’s easy for Dwight Howard to say that we don’t need to play when he’s in Atlanta in his $20 million mansion. But there are other guys on the rosters who need this money to provide for whoever they’re taking care of and things like that. It’s easy for the superstars in the league to say this and how they feel about this and that. But it means a lot more when it comes from the role players.”

Listen and subscribe to “Sports Uncovered” for free wherever you listen to podcasts.

There was nobody like the great Jerry Sloan -- and there still isn't

There was nobody like the great Jerry Sloan -- and there still isn't

The Utah Jazz announced today that former coach Jerry Sloan has died at the age of 78. He had been battling Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia for several years.

And battling is what Sloan did most of his life.

He was a fighter as an NBA player, when he was in the tough-as-nails Chicago Bulls’ backcourt alongside Norm Van Lier. As a coach with the Utah Jazz, he preached a physical approach to the game and was as feisty as any NBA coach has ever been. I saw him square off with former teammate and Blazer Coach Rick Adelman after a summer-league game in Salt Lake City once -- neither man willing to back off. And of course, they were great friends.

You won’t find many people who don’t think he was a better human than coach. And he was a Hall of Fame coach. He was a wonderful, self-deprecating man with the kind of spirit you probably get from growing up as the youngest of 10 children raised by a single mother in the little town of Gobbler’s Knob, Ill. You get up at 4:30 in the morning to do farm chores and then walk two miles to school, you might just develop some character, too.

The writers loved him. He’d always pop into the media dining room a couple of hours before the game and enjoy a meal with us, so cordial to everyone -- whether you worked for the New York Times or the Sellwood Bee. I was fortunate to share a friendship with the Jazz trainer, the great Mike Shimensky, and Mike would always make sure I knew when and where Jerry and his top assistant Phil Johnson were going to be hanging out the night before a game in Portland. Usually, it was Champion’s at the Marriott, and I’d meet up with them for a night of nachos, wings, a few cold drinks and a lot of laughs.

The man was a storyteller of the highest order.

But he kept it real. And he trusted. He would talk openly about his team or yours, knowing you wouldn’t run out and share it with anyone.

That doesn’t happen much these days.

I watched several times as the Utah owner at the time, the late Larry Miller, jumped out of his courtside seat at halftime and followed his team into the locker room.

I asked Jerry if it bothered him to have his owner eavesdropping during the intermission.

“Not at all,” he said with a wide smile. “I want him to see what I have to deal with. I want him to know what’s going on in there. He can come in anytime he wants.”

That was Coach Sloan. Transparent. Nothing to hide. His teams seldom tried to trick you. Every team in the league knew what the Jazz would run. And they would run it so well you couldn’t stop it.

And if you couldn’t stop it, you might see the same thing 15 times in a row because that’s what worked. Pretty simple.

Jerry Sloan liked it that way. He was beloved within the NBA family and you will see that in the days to come, as those who knew him much better than I did, memorialize him. There was nobody like him.

Still isn’t.

Reaction to Blazers 1996 Game 3 win over Jazz: Fans 'miss everything' about Arvydas Sabonis' game

Reaction to Blazers 1996 Game 3 win over Jazz: Fans 'miss everything' about Arvydas Sabonis' game

Monday night was a fun one especially if you are a fan of big man Arvydas Sabonis.

But really, who isn’t? 

Rip City was treated to the 1996 Western Conference First Round playoff battle between Portland and Utah.

It was Game 3 between the Trail Blazers and Jazz -- a game played in the Rose Garden back on April 29, 1996.

In the overtime victory, Sabonis did a little bit of everything. 

Sabonis led the scoring charge for the Blazers with 27 points. He also pulled down 12 rebounds, as Portland won at home in OT, 94-91 after being down 0-2 in the series. Sabonis finished 10-for-22 from the floor including 2-of-5 from deep.

He also added two assists, two blocks, and one steal.  

The 1995-96 season was the Lithuanian center's first season with the Trail Blazers.

Rip City Faithful discussed all the facets of Sabonis' game they miss while rewatching Game 3. 

As Trail Blazers fans witnessed the younger Sabonis (at age 31) Thursday night, fans couldn’t help but reminisce about the big fella’s passing skills.

This game overall was not a pretty one offensively. The Trail Blazers led by six at halftime, 37-31. The 68 combined points tied the NBA record for fewest points combined in a half. 

Team Mom described the low-scoring affair pretty well:

‘Oof.’

It was veteran Buck Williams, though. who saved the day in Game 3 in front of a sellout crowd. 

Williams’ put-back bucket after a Sabonis miss with 14.1 seconds in OT gave the Trail Blazers a 93-91 lead.

Some Trail Blazers fans may not have remembered that Williams was still on this 1995-96 team.

Watching the NBCSNW Trail Blazers Classic games has forced some of Rip City to realize they don’t always remember all of the Trail Blazer players in the 80s and 90s eras.


But, one thing is certain: 

Fans will always remember what Sabonis brought to the Blazers from 1995-2001. They will also continue to ponder the big 'what if.'

 "What if Sabonis spent his prime in Portland?"

After Monday’s classic game it really makes you wonder. 

How to Watch: Trail Blazers vs. Jazz Game 3, 1996 First Round

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@trailblazers

How to Watch: Trail Blazers vs. Jazz Game 3, 1996 First Round

Buckle up for another overtime thriller!

It’s time to revisit the 1996 Western Conference First Round playoff battle between Portland and Utah in this Trail Blazers Classic Game.

It was Game 3 between the Trail Blazers vs. Jazz -- a game played in the Rose Garden back on April 29, 1996.

Arvydas Sabonis led the charge for the Blazers with 27 points with 12 rebounds, as Portland won at home in OT, 94-91 after being down 0-2 in the series.

It was the veteran Buck Williams who saved the day.  

Williams’ put-back bucket after a Sabonis miss with 14.1 seconds in OT gave the Trail Blazes a 93-91 lead.

Portland shot just 34 percent from the floor for the game, but had the finally say in the extra period.

Neither team shot well in the first half. The total 68 points tied the NBA record for fewest points combined in a half.

Starters for Blazers vs. Jazz on April 29, 1996:

UTAH

Karl Malone

David Benoit

Jeff Hornacek

John Stockton

Felton Spencer

PORTLAND

Rod Strickland

Clifford Robinson

Arvydas Sabonis

Aaron McKie

Harvery Grant

HOW TO WATCH: Trail Blazers vs. Jazz in Game 3 in the First Round of the 1996

WHEN: Monday, May 4 at 8:00pm 

Channel: NBC Sports Northwest, Channel 737 (Portland), 617 (Seattle)

CHANNEL FINDER

Stream the game here.  

Or stream the game on your phone with the 'MyTeams' App -- available in the App Store for iPhones and on Google play.

Check out the full slate of Trail Blazers Classic Games right here.  

Social media reaction to Portland's Game 6 win over Utah Jazz in 1999 West semifinals

Social media reaction to Portland's Game 6 win over Utah Jazz in 1999 West semifinals

Trail Blazers fans were treated to Portland’s 92-80 victory over the Utah Jazz which clinched the series win as the Trail Blazers advanced to the Western Conference finals in 1999.

Dustin was pumped for Thursday’s Trail Blazers Classic Game all day.

A big reason why Portland was able to slow down the Utah Jazz, who, by the way, had been the Western Conference Champs the previous two years, was thanks to Brian Grant.

The Trail Blazers forward bodied up one of the most physical players in the game, Utah’s Karl Malone.

Grant held Malone to 3-of-16 shooting for just eight points, while out-rebounding him 12-7. 

That Brian Grant defense was and can still be thought of as inspirational.  

The Game 6 loss was Utah’s 11th straight playoffs loss in Portland.

It wasn’t just Grant who was trending in Rip City Thursday night. 

Fans were talking about the Blazers' entire front court of Rasheed Wallace, Arvydas Sabonis and Grant.

In the win, Sabonis finished with 14 points and six rebounds with the best plus/minus on the team with a plus-18.

There was so much love back then and now for Sheed as well. Wallace added 14 points and four rebounds in the Game 6 victory. 

Portland was led by six-year wing player Isaiah Rider, who scored 24 points, while shooting guard Jim Jackson had 17 off the bench.

And, how about those Blazers fans rocking the Rose Garden in ’99!?

The Trail Blazers advanced to the Western Conference Finals in front of a sellout crowd in Portland.

Memories from Trail Blazers vs. Jazz 1999 West semifinals Game 6

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Brian Grant Foundation

Memories from Trail Blazers vs. Jazz 1999 West semifinals Game 6

If you’re a Brian Grant fan, tonight’s Trail Blazer classic game will make you very happy. It’s a can’t-miss game for all those who appreciated the hard work of the soft-spoken, popular player.

The 92-88 Portland win over the Utah Jazz clinched a series win and advanced Portland to the Western Conference finals. Thanks to Grant, the tough-as-nails 6-8 power forward who played 40:11 against one of the most physical players in the game, Utah’s Karl Malone.

Grant took a nasty elbow from Malone in Game 5 of the series and showed up to do some heavy business in this game against the Hall of Fame Utah forward. Grant held Malone to 3-16 shooting, outrebounded him 12-7 and held him to eight points -- the first time in 148 playoff games that Malone didn’t make it into double figures.

Isaiah Rider scored 24 points to lead Portland, hitting eight straight free throws in the final 33 seconds, as the Jazz were forced to foul at the end.

And Rider was pumped, delighting the sellout crowd by jumping on the scorer’s table and pounding his chest when it was over.

“Tonight was my biggest night in basketball,” Rider said. “I think we shocked the world.”

The Jazz lost a playoff game in Portland for the 11th straight time over a span of 11 years.

The Trail Blazers played a very physical game and outrebounded the Jazz 42-29. The series win vaulted Portland into a Western Conference finals berth against the San Antonio Spurs.
The Spurs swept that series 4-0.

How to Watch: Trail Blazers vs. Jazz Game 6 of 1999 West semifinals

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USA Today Images

How to Watch: Trail Blazers vs. Jazz Game 6 of 1999 West semifinals

This Trail Blazers Classic game was played on May 27, 1999.

But now that Game 6 will be re-airing on NBCSNW tonight.

It was a clinching 1999 Western Conference semifinals game for the Trail Blazers at the Rose Garden after defeating the Jazz, 92-80.

Portland was led by six-year wing player Isaiah Rider, who scored 24 points, while shooting guard Jim Jackson had 17 off the bench. 

In this Game 6, the Mailman did not deliver thanks to Blazers power forward Brian Grant .

Utah’s big man Karl Malone had one of his worst playoff performances. He scored just eight points, going 3-of-16 from the field. It was Jeff Hornacek, who led Utah with 21 points. Hornacek also made one of two free throws with just under 90 seconds remaining to cut Portland’s lead to two.

The Trail Blazers advanced to the Western Conference Finals in front of a sellout crowd in Portland. The Jazz were the West champions in 1997 and 1998. But it was Portland’s turn in 1999 as Utah lost its 11th straight playoff game in Rip City.

Starters for Blazers vs. Jazz on May 27, 1999:

UTAH

Karl Malone

Bryon Russell

Jeff Hornacek

John Stockton

Greg Ostertag

PORTLAND

Brian Grant

Arvydas Sabonis

Isaiah Rider

Rasheed Wallace

Damon Stoudamire 

HOW TO WATCH: Trail Blazers vs. Jazz in Game 6 of the 1999 Western Conference Semifinals

WHEN: Thursday, April 30 at 6:30pm 

Channel: NBC Sports Northwest, Channel 737 (Portland), 617 (Seattle)

CHANNEL FINDER

Stream the game here.  

Or stream the game on your phone with the 'MyTeams' App -- available in the App Store for iPhones and on Google play.

Check out the full slate of Trail Blazers Classic Games right here.  

Terry Porter explains the biggest difference from his era to now

Terry Porter explains the biggest difference from his era to now

The physical nature of the 1992 Western Conference Finals battle between the Portland Trail Blazers and Utah Jazz made it a series that Terry Porter will never forget.

The Blazers' focus was on defense, despite, Porter connecting from deep more than another player in the series.

In Portland’s decisive Game 6 victory, Porter shot just 1-for-6 from three-point range. However, in the series-clinching 105-97 win over Utah, that one three-point make helped him set an NBA Playoff record (for a six-game series), after connecting on 18 three-pointers (in 34 attempts) for the series.  

The No. 24th pick overall by the Trail Blazers in the 1985 NBA draft, joined Blazers analyst Lamar Hurd on the team's Instagram account to reminisce about the 1992 Game 6 win while the classic game was aired on NBCSNW Wednesday night.

Porter had a big smile on his face when he compared his era to what he sees from the current generation of NBA players. 

I think that this generation is all about the three-ball. It’s all about the three-point shot -- that really defines the game, along with the pick and roll. Back then, the two things that defined the game was getting lay-ups and also post-up play. I mean, unless the playoffs roll around --there was a no-lay-up rule, so you fouled at all costs to not give up lay-ups. -- Former Trail Blazers point guard Terry Porter

Porter joked, “if you had that rule today, it wouldn’t matter because there’s no lay-ups anyways, it’s just threes.”

The 57-year-old wouldn’t change his experience or his era for anything though.

“It was just a different mindset, a different game… It was a great style. I think the fans really enjoyed it. I know I really enjoyed playing in that era because it had so much physicality, but also because it also had a great brand of basketball,” Porter added. 

The two-time NBA All-Star couldn’t help but mention he would’ve attempted and made a few more three-pointers though had he played in the current NBA era.

“I only attempted three or four, and nowadays it’d be like nine or 10. I would’ve had a few more FGAs that’s for sure,” Porter laughed.

The Blazers were the top team to make the most threes in a single playoff series during the 1992 WCF with 31 makes. 

Not playing in the same era also means it’s not fair to compare players over the years, at least if you ask Porter.

“You can’t say just because some guy got more shots than the next guy that doesn’t make him a better shooter. You talk about the shooters of our era – the Glen Rice, the Mark Price, -- whoever you define as great shooters, if you give them another eight or nine shots and just take their percentages, they’d be right there with all the current great shooters, me included,” Porter said.   

Looking at the current NBA records, the most 3-point field goals attempted in a seven-game series is 80 attempts by Warriors guard Stephen Curry which was set in 2016 versus Cleveland.

Curry also holds the most 3-point field goals made at 32 threes made in a seven-game series against Oklahoma City in 2016 as well the Cavaliers that same year.

Probably for the most part we probably took half of what the current guys take in regards to three-point attempts…

Different era, different point of emphasis on what teams was trying to do offensively and how they were trying to attack their defensive opponent. It’s hard to say one player is the greatest shooter just based on because he makes 10 threes and the next guy only makes three. -- Former Trail Blazers point guard Terry Porter

Porter only missed a total of 15 games through his first nine seasons in the league.

That is also something to note that is different from back in his day.  

“I was blessed to have good genes,” Porter said with a smile. “I always tried to take care of my body… I stayed on the perimeter. I did go to the paint, for the most part, under control. So, I was blessed with good genes, but also blessed to have a body that didn’t break down.”

The Trail Blazers All-Time leader in assists also took the opportunity to poke fun at the idea of sitting out of a game for 'load management.’

“Back then we didn’t have load management or anything like that. Guys just wanted to play. I don’t know if it’s just a different generation. You look at the elite players back then, those guys always set the tone and wanted to play the games and wanted to make sure they were out there to go to war with their bodies,” Porter said.

Porter also mentioned that the 1991-92 Blazers team really prided themselves on their defense. Defending the John Stockton and Karl Malone pick and roll was something Porter spoke fondly of when reminiscing about Game 6.

“These two guys may have started the pick and roll a generation before it even really started,” Porter said.

“We tried to eliminate their easy buckets. Eliminate Karl from slipping out and getting lay-ups… And make sure John Stockton wasn’t able to turn the corner and get in the paint. We tried to have things in place to take away those options for those guys.”

Taking away options -- that’s what 90s basketball took pride in those days.

It’ll be interesting to hear from Damian Lillard 20 years from now as he discusses the differences in the NBA game from back in his day.

How will the NBA look then? Will there be a four-point basket? Just imagine what Lillard would have to say about a four-point shot. The league will have to call those four-pointers Logo Lillards.

Right? 

Trail Blazers fans reminisce about 1990s basketball while watching 1992 Game 6 win over Jazz

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@trailblazers

Trail Blazers fans reminisce about 1990s basketball while watching 1992 Game 6 win over Jazz

Wednesday, April 15, 2020 -- It was scheduled to be the Portland Trail Blazers final game of the season. The Trail Blazers would have been hosting the LA Clippers tonight in game 82 of the NBA season, had it not been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Even though the Trail Blazers weren’t on the court tonight, Rip City was treated to the final Trail Blazers Classic Game on NBC Sports Northwest  -- Game 6 of the Blazers and Jazz Western Conference Finals in 1992.  

Fans all over social media reminisced about 1990s basketball.  

At least this time around, watching the decisive Game 6, fans didn’t feel that same anxiety that they did watching it live back in 1992.

Game summaries of the 1992 Western Conference Finals

  • Game 1:
  • PORTLAND 113, Utah 88
  • Game 2:
  • PORTLAND 119, Utah 102
  • Game 3:
  • UTAH 97, Portland 89
  • Game 4:
  • UTAH 121, Portland 112
  • Game 5:
  • PORTLAND 127, Utah 121 (OT)
  • Game 6:
  • Portland 105, UTAH 97

Clyde Drexler, Terry Porter, and Jerome Kersey all scored 18 points apiece to help the Blazers clinch a spot in the NBA Finals. 

During the 1991-92 season, Drexler averaged 40.3 minutes, 26.3 points, 7.4 rebounds, and 7.0 assists per game.

Porter averaged 41.4 minutes, 21.4 points, 4.6 rebounds, and 6.7 assists during the regular season.

But in this game Jerome Kersey got the ball rolling.

Kersey scored 10 points in the first quarter to help the Blazers get off to a good start on the road, Rip City showed their love for Kersey on Twitter.

Trail Blazers fans also voiced their opinions on who and what they miss most about 90s basketball and the 1991-92 Trail Blazers team.

https://twitter.com/therealCVD4/status/1250613135926419457

Terry Porter joined current Blazers television analyst Lamar Hurd on the Blazers Instagram Live during the fourth quarter of Wednesday’s re-air of Game 6.

Don’t turn the ball over… We did a pretty good job of keeping their crowd pretty quiet… It was all about taking care of the ball… Making sure [the Jazz] were having possessions that were one and done. -- Terry Porter told Lamar Hurd on Instagram Live

Porter also mentioned that the game plan was to try to take Karl Malone out of the game or at least limit him from getting easy buckets and from getting to the free throw line. Which meant also trying to keep Kevin Duckworth out of foul trouble.

The 1992 postseason recap for the Trail Blazers 

  • Round 1:
  • Defeated L.A. Lakers, 3-1
  • West Semis:
  • Defeated Phoenix, 4-1
  • West Finals:
  • Defeated Utah, 4-2
  • NBA Finals:
  • Lost to Chicago, 2-4