76ers

After lifting up teetering Sixers, Al Horford makes sure to drink in the win

After lifting up teetering Sixers, Al Horford makes sure to drink in the win

The Lakers had cut the Sixers’ lead, once as large as 22 points, down to five Saturday night with 5:19 remaining. The Sixers were teetering, and Al Horford had something to say.

“Coach called a timeout, we went to the bench and I just told the group to stay together,” Horford recalled. “They made a run, and we needed to respond. To that point I felt like we were doing a good job with the game, keeping them at a certain distance. We made some plays there to give us some breathing room and just closed them out.”

Horford made a handful of those plays himself. He scored seven straight points, nailing a contested mid-range jumper, a three and a baseline fadeaway. 

His performance was one of many that earned a shoutout from Brett Brown in the Sixers’ postgame bell ringing ceremony after a 108-91 victory (see observations). 

You've gotta love Horford's reaction. The 33-year-old just stares ahead and takes a sip of his beverage, seemingly unaffected by the whole scene.

For his part, though, Horford thought this was an especially meaningful win for the Sixers against an opponent who entered with a 36-9 record, best in the Western Conference. 

“I said it yesterday, I thought it was a big game coming into it," he said. “And I think it’s a big win. It’s a really big win. Obviously we’re missing some starters, and I just think the way Ben [Simmons] and Tobias [Harris] came out and established it for us and set the tone for our group, I think it went a long way. 

“This a huge win. I know people get caught up, it’s January, it’s whatever — it’s a huge win. And that’s a really good team over there. I’m really proud of our group.”

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Allen Iverson is all of us watching the Sixers

Allen Iverson is all of us watching the Sixers

Allen Iverson is Philadelphia.

From his reckless style on the court to his famous ear cupping for the crowd to kissing the floor in his return as a Denver Nugget, Iverson’s lasting impact on the city is immeasurable.

A big part of the reason for that connection is that The Answer always wore his heart on his sleeve.

Now as a fan of his former team, Iverson frequently sits courtside — and still lets his emotions show.

As part of Amazon’s All or Nothing series, which followed around the Eagles this past season, you saw offensive linemen Brandon Brooks and Isaac Seumalo sitting courtside next to A.I.

The microphone picked up some gold.

(Brooks’ reaction is also priceless.)

With all due respect to the Eagles, this might have been the best moment of the series so far.

Allen Iverson, as Philly as it gets.

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Watch Allen Iverson, Dwyane Wade share vulnerable All-Star moment over Kobe

Watch Allen Iverson, Dwyane Wade share vulnerable All-Star moment over Kobe

A huge portion of the weekend's NBA All-Star Game was dedicated to remembering Lakers legend and Philly-area native Kobe Bryant, from the touching pre-game tribute to the players' jersey numbers.

There were plenty of Bryant jerseys among the weekend's attendees, too, including Sixers legend Allen Iverson, who sported a No. 8 yellow Bryant jersey during Sunday's All-Star Game.

Iverson was interacting with some fans at the United Center in Chicago when he bumped into Dwyane Wade, and the two shared a beautifully unscripted, vulnerable moment. Incredibly, one fan captured the scene, and video of the two legends' interaction surfaced Tuesday afternoon:

That's something special.

Wade and Iverson's NBA careers overlapped for seven years, including six shared All-Star Games. Bryant entered the league the same year as Iverson, and Wade made his final All-Star Game the year Bryant retired.

The three spent so much shared time in the league, creating their own stories and navigating their own paths, and it's an absolute tragedy that Bryant wasn't in Chicago this past weekend to enjoy yet another show from the league's stars.

Moments like this one help remind fans that, while players like Bryant, Wade, and Iverson often seem superhuman, they're ultimately people like us, and they process grief just like we do.

Good on Wade and Iverson for being there for each other.

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