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JJ Redick talks social media, life after Jimmy Butler trade, more on The Habershow

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JJ Redick talks social media, life after Jimmy Butler trade, more on The Habershow

JJ Redick isn’t spending too much time on social media these days since he deleted all of his accounts this offseason, but perhaps starting a book club could be in his future.

Redick, the Sixers' sharpshooter who's averaging 18.3 points in 39 games this season, joined our NBA insider Tom Haberstroh on the latest "The Habershow" podcast Friday.

The 34-year-old has found an interesting roadblock living without social media.

"I was trying to get a car deal because I drive back and forth between Brooklyn and Philly, because I've been driving myself this year," Redick said. "And the car companies were like, 'Well, you're not on social media so there's no benefit to us.' I said, 'that's fine.'"

Overall, though, Redick has been enjoying his time away, where he admitted the toxic environment can affect the mindset of NBA players as they do their jobs on a nightly basis. Without social media, Redick is filling up his time by reading more books.

"This year," he said, "I'd like to read 24 books — two a month."

Redick also discussed reaching 10,000 career points, handling mean-spirited comments directed toward him, staying in touch with Dario Saric and Robert Covington and more.

On 10,000 career points

Haberstroh challenged Redick to name the top 10 of the 188 guys that assisted him on that career milestone. Redick did pretty well compiling the list.

“I’m gonna guess Chris Paul," Redick said. "I’ll say Blake (Griffin) is in my top 10. Jameer (Nelson) and Turk (Hedo Turkoglu) … I know it’s early, but I’m gonna say Ben (Simmons). And is Joel in there?”

Yes, Joel Embiid is in the top 10. Number five on the list, in fact, a milestone other bigs might have accomplished earlier in his career if the patented handoff play was counted as an assist.

Still, Redick recounted the unique style each one had including this nugget about TJ McConnell’s passes.

“Rugby's. We call them rugby’s," Redick said. "The PG drives down the middle on like a transition or delayed transition and flips it back to you at the three-point line.”

On handling the mean-spirited nature of public comments

“I’m pretty well-versed in dealing with animosity," Redick said. "But the thing is, there’s some things that are so stupid that they still make you mad. If there’s an underlying truth to something, whether it’s something written let’s say in a real article, I’m able to say, ‘You know what? I gotta be better. Whatever.’ But some things are so stupid or out of left field, that you’re like, ‘Is this person serious?’”

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Matisse Thybulle, Ben Simmons and Sixers provide insight into life in NBA 'bubble'

Matisse Thybulle, Ben Simmons and Sixers provide insight into life in NBA 'bubble'

Hearing the Sixers describe their early days inside the NBA’s “bubble” at Disney World, it sounds something like living inside a reality television show.

The team is isolated from the outside world and preparing to perform for the general public’s entertainment. In their downtime, many players have felt as if they’re at summer camp, not an environment created in response to a pandemic. They’re taking part in approved recreational activities while making sure to adhere to the league’s many health and safety regulations. Fishing has been an option some players have enjoyed. 

“The fishing conditions are very good, a lot of largemouth bass,” Ben Simmons said Monday in a video conference call. “I fish a lot so this is what I do every day. I work out, play some video games and fish, so that’s my day-to-day routine. But overall I think everyone is just doing something to be productive in some sort of aspect. 

“I think guys are enjoying it. Myself, personally, I’m just having a good time, getting ready for the games coming up and using the free time to just do something that I enjoy doing. So it’s been good.”

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We went fishing for some bass 🎣

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Joel Embiid said Monday he’s enjoying his “big TV and video games. … Just enjoying my time being on FaceTime basically 24/7 and playing video games.”

The NBA and NBPA announced Monday that two players of the 322 tested in Orlando were positive for the coronavirus, and that those players never cleared quarantine. Though many questions linger about the league’s approach, both in terms of efficacy and morality as the NBA ramps up to play in a location where COVID-19 has taken a serious toll on the healthcare system, it seems to have been successful so far in preventing a spread of the coronavirus on the Disney World campus.

Monday, ESPN reported that the Rockets' Bruno Caboclo unintentionally broke quarantine, while former Sixer Richaun Holmes tweeted that he accidentally breached the bubble to pick up a food delivery. Both players were subject to extended time in quarantine. The Athletic's Shams Charania reported Monday that multiple tips have been made to the NBA's anonymous hotline to report protocol violations. 

At least initially, Brett Brown thought his players were doing a good job of following all precautions. 

“How are the players responding? Well," Brown said Sunday. “Do I think it can be maintained? I do, as far as the discipline. We all worry about the virus, in some capacity, sneaking it. But I tell you what, full credit to the NBA for creating this environment, and credit to the players for being — albeit (in early days) — disciplined to do the things that they have asked us to do.”

Rookie Matisse Thybulle’s video series on life in the bubble has provided a look at this unusual existence for players. Thybulle is showing fans everything from testing procedures to practice banter to a masked general manager Elton Brand sinking a jumper. 

“He didn’t get clearance to put me on,” Simmons said with a smile. “I’m going to have to speak to him if he makes any money off it. But I love it, I love that he’s capturing this moment. It’s a historic moment for sports in general. I think what he’s been doing has been great.”

It’s excellent insight from Thybulle into a situation nobody has ever come close to experiencing before. His two videos thus far have totaled over 500,000 views on YouTube, so Simmons may be wise to renegotiate a royalty agreement. 

On a more serious note, Mike Scott on Monday summed up life in the bubble well. He has no complaints.

“I just know how to adapt to situations I’m in,” he said. “It’s not that bad. The hotel room is good, food is solid. It’s just basketball after that. It feels like camp, like a basketball camp. You go from your room to the court from the court to your room, see some players here and there, but for the most part, I’m not really tripping. It’s straight, it’s cool.”

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Ben Simmons drained a three in practice, so of course Sixers fans went crazy

Ben Simmons drained a three in practice, so of course Sixers fans went crazy

The Sixers are finally back practicing as a team down in the NBA's Disney bubble. After going four months without seeing their favorite players on the floor together, Sixers fans probably would've been happy to watch a 10-minute video of eblow jumpers and bounce passes.

Instead, they were given the holy grail of Sixers practice clips: a Ben Simmons three.

The fateful shot, a catch-and-shoot three from the left wing, comes about 24 seconds into a video of practice highlights:

You've got to love the team casually dropping that clip into the compilation, as if it's just another shot and not the most polarizing argument in the organization's orbit.

Of note, Simmons' two in-NBA game threes were taken from the respective corners, while his preseason three against the Guangzhou Loong-Lions came from the opposite wing, off the dribble. So this is a unique shot from Simmons, and it looked good.

Now, you might think that Sixers fans, hardened after multiple offseasons of "this is the year Simmons shoots threes!" chatter, would avoid overreacting to the shot.

You... would be wrong:

It's fair to say basketball fans are excited to watch some basketball.

With Simmons heading to the power forward position in the Sixers' new-look starting lineup later this month, perhaps he'll decide to go crazy and test out a new approach to his shot selection, too. It's... possible?

Or maybe he will never change. We'll see.

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