76ers

Scouting Sixers' new additions Tobias Harris, Boban Marjanovic and Mike Scott

Scouting Sixers' new additions Tobias Harris, Boban Marjanovic and Mike Scott

The Sixers’ rotation is going to look a little different Friday night than it did in Tuesday's loss vs. the Raptors.

After the Sixers’ trade Wednesday with the Clippers, we analyze the strengths and weaknesses of Tobias Harris, Boban Marjanovic and Mike Scott in this week’s film review. 

Tobias Harris 

Harris should complement Joel Embiid, Ben Simmons and Jimmy Butler very well.

His best skill is his shooting — he’s hitting three-pointers at a 43.4 percent clip this season, and you’d imagine he’ll get more open shots in the Sixers’ offense. On the play below, notice the way he subtly slides over from the wing into the corner and takes advantage of the Sixers’ confusion on a switch.

Harris is far from just a spot-up shooter. He’s good at attacking mismatches when he gets a switch on a pick-and-roll, when he gets a favorable matchup in transition, or when he simply knows he’s a step quicker than his defender, as is the case on this play. Though he’s a right-handed shooter, Harris is very strong driving to his left and will generally choose that option when he has the chance. 

Another strength of his game is his floater, a shot he uses often. With Amir Johnson playing drop coverage on the pick-and-roll, Harris put in a beautiful one over the Sixers’ big man on Nov. 1. 

Though Harris’ floater is excellent, he sometimes settles or fades away instead of taking the ball all the way to the rim.

His ability to create for others is not a strong suit. It would be unfair to classify it as a massive weakness — he’s averaging 2.7 assists per game this season and can hit the open man. But he doesn’t have great feel as a passer. His instinct to hit Marcin Gortat is correct on the play below, but he overshoots him by a couple feet.

Still, Harris is a very good offensive player, and he’s an above-average defender too. He handled Ben Simmons better than most in their two matchups this season, sliding his feet well to cut off possible transition opportunities and using his length intelligently.

Harris is also an alert defender off the ball, though he doesn’t force a ton of turnovers (0.7 steals and 0.4 blocks per game). And he’s not a lost cause when switched onto smaller, perimeter players. 

Boban Marjanovic 

You might have heard that Marjanovic is a large man. In fact, at 7-foot-3, 290 pounds he’s the biggest player in the NBA.

Marjanovic is an incredibly efficient scorer, with 6.9 points per game in a career-high 10.7 minutes this season. Many of his points come from lay-ups and no-jump dunks, but he has a nice hook shot in his arsenal as well.

Defensively, Marjanovic uses his size to deter opponents from the paint and swat away shots. However, defense is where he’s most vulnerable. He doesn’t have the foot speed to cope with big men who can stretch the floor, or even centers with Joel Embiid’s quickness and agility in the post. 

Mike Scott 

Scott is a stretch-four who comes into Philadelphia on a bit of a hot streak, shooting 53.3 percent from three-point range over his past twelve games. Out of his 2.6 three-point attempts per game, 2.2 are of the catch-and-shoot variety. 

Besides his shooting, Scott doesn’t have any great strengths. He’s not an elite athlete and, at 6-foot-8, is usually a little undersized on the interior. The sequence below is a good example of what you’re getting from Scott defensively. While he sticks with the play and eventually comes away with the rebound after Joel Embiid misses an easy shot, he’s typically not going to pose many issues for bigger players down low.



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Jerry Stackhouse tries to set record straight on scrimmages with 17-year-old Kobe Bryant

Jerry Stackhouse tries to set record straight on scrimmages with 17-year-old Kobe Bryant

At 17 years old, Kobe Bryant was scrimmaging against professional athletes and Philadelphia college stars, about to embark on a 20-year NBA career.

He impressed in those scrimmages with his skill and bravado. But, according to Jerry Stackhouse, Bryant wasn’t big on passing. 

Stackhouse, now the head coach at Vanderbilt, spent the first two-plus years of his career with the Sixers before being traded to the Pistons and matched up with Bryant in those scrimmages.

What happened with Kobe was nobody really wanted to play with Kobe,” he said on The Woj Pod. “[Former La Salle star and NBA player] Lionel Simmons, you used to always see him pulling Kobe to the side, like, ‘Man, you gotta pass the ball! You gotta learn how to do this!' Because the older guys were from Philly. … These stories kind of take on a life of their own. And yes, Kobe had some good days scoring the ball, because he could handle it so well. But he had tunnel vision at that point. You had pickup games, sometimes he didn’t even get picked up. 

“But again, because he’s so been great since this, these stories go back of ‘Oh, he beat Stackhouse one-on-one.’ Come on, man. Me at 20 years old, can you imagine a 17-year-old beating me consistently? I’d have hurt him first, real talk. Just physically, that could never happen to me. Did we play one-on-one? Yes. Did he beat me, did he maybe win a game? Yes. Did he consistently beat Jerry Stackhouse at 20 years old when he was 17? Hell no. I’m putting an end to that story. … Was he super talented and everyone saw great potential in him? Yes, but those scenarios … of Kobe Bryant, they’re a little bit of a different story when you go talk to people that were actually in the gym. 

Stackhouse noted that it took a little time for Bryant to adjust to the NBA game, which is true. The Lower Merion High School graduate played only 15.5 minutes per game as a rookie. Of course, he went on to make 18 All-Star Games, win five NBA championships and become one of the best players of his era. 

Though Stackhouse wanted to set the record straight on those one-on-one games with Bryant, he was still amazed by his ability at such a young age.

“This kid was unbelievable,” he said. “Just his ball handling ability … he grew up, obviously, emulating Michael Jordan.”

However, the members of the Philadelphia basketball community who were in the gym for those scrimmages were apparently ruthless in their critiques.

“I vividly remember the old heads from Philadelphia,” Stackhouse said, “[they're] like, ‘Come on, man, you gotta pass the ball! That ain’t how you gotta play!’” 

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Sixers fans can't stop laughing at Bulls for interviewing Bryan Colangelo

Sixers fans can't stop laughing at Bulls for interviewing Bryan Colangelo

Updated, Thursday, 12:35 a.m.: The Bulls are finalizing a deal to hire Nuggets GM Arturas Karnisovas as their Executive VP of Basketball Operations, according to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski. 

**** 

Sixers fans, grasping at any semblance of basketball news, received a cruise ship-sized life line on Wednesday.

The Athletic's Shams Charania reported the Bulls have interviewed former 76ers president Bryan Colangelo for their top basketball ops position:

This is, of course, kind of a mind-boggling decision from the Bulls, considering the way Colangelo's bumpy tenure in Philly ended. 

You know, Burner-gate. Remember that insanity? Remember when the active general manager of the 76ers was linked to Twitter accounts actively disparaging his own players? That really happened!

And yet, despite the public unraveling of his time with the Sixers, and the unsavory nature of his resignation, the Bulls somehow deemed Colangelo worthy of an interview for this position as they try to kickstart their floundering franchise.

Sixers fans couldn't believe it:

Some laughed, and laughed, and laughed:

Some encouraged the insanity, because there's nothing Sixers fans love more than watching a tire fire form in real time:

And then, of course, Sixers Twitter came with the jokes, because they are ruthless and unceasing:

Colangelo actually landing the job is, admittedly, probably a long shot. But the fact that he could even garner an interview at this point in his career, and after his last stop, is both hilarious and confounding.

And Sixers fans are here for it, entirely.

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