76ers

What are Sixers looking for during Game 7 of Celtics-Bucks?

What are Sixers looking for during Game 7 of Celtics-Bucks?

CAMDEN, N.J. — The Sixers will find out their second-round opponent Saturday evening, less than 48 hours before game one of the Eastern Conference semifinals.

It will be either the No. 2 Celtics or No. 7 Bucks. A Bucks win would mean the Sixers retain home court advantage and play Games 1 and 2 Monday and Wednesday at the Wells Fargo Center. A Celtics victory would start the series in Boston, with the first two games played Monday and Thursday at TD Garden. 

“I feel like whoever we play is who we play,” Ben Simmons said. “We’ll be ready for that matchup.” 

The Sixers’ focus is their own preparation, not doubling up on strategies based on potential competition. They won their first round series against the Heat 3-1 because they implemented their style of basketball and didn’t shift to play Miami’s game. 

“To pretend you’re going to scout the Celtics and then scout the Bucks, that’s not going to happen,” Brett Brown said. “We try to choose things that are going to help us get better and deal with our opponent once we know it. We feel like we’ve done our due diligence to lay out a game plan, that’s not the issue. Just anointing a practice ‘This is for the Bucks’ or ‘This is for the Celtics,’ that’s not going to happen and we zoomed in on ourselves.”   

That’s not to say the players don’t have their own predictions. The Celtics are heading back to Boston, where they were 27-14 at home this season. No team has won on the road in this series. 

“I think that Boston tonight is going to win the game,” Marco Belinelli said. “That’s my opinion because I think they have a good team, they’re going to play a home game, they know how to play this type of game, they’ve got good experience on how to play this playoff game, Game 7. I think Milwaukee’s a great team. They really fight and it’s going to be really interesting to see which team is going to win tonight.”

Whoever the opponent is, the Sixers know the importance of homecourt advantage. They were nearly unstoppable in Philadelphia to close out the regular season and would have a major edge if the series started at the Wells Fargo Center. 

“I think I will be more for Milwaukee because we have homecourt advantage against them,” Saric said. “But if you play against Boston, it’s like unbelievable franchise, unbelievable organization for so many years. It’s always nice to play in their gym in front of all their jerseys that hang up out there. It’s not something I want more or less. I think both of them are great opponents for us and I think we can beat both of them.”

Game 7 of Celtics vs. Bucks begins at 8 p.m. Saturday night. 

Which era of Sixers basketball would make the best documentary?

Which era of Sixers basketball would make the best documentary?

The Sixers are a franchise rich in history and, let’s face it, rich in drama.

With ESPN moving up the release of The Last Dance, a documentary about the dominance of Michael Jordan and the Bulls in their last Finals run, it sparked an interesting debate on the Sixers Talk podcast.

Which era of Sixers basketball would you most like to see a documentary on?

Co-hosts Danny Pommells and Paul Hudrick both made the case for Dr. J, Moses Malone and the teams of 1980’s … but for very different reasons.

Don’t get me wrong,” Hudrick said, “some of The Process stuff would be great to get some behind-the-scenes nuggets of what was going on there with some of the decisions that were made and getting some answers to the questions that we’ve all had. …

“[In a documentary on the 1980’s team] we can all go back and watch and see, ‘Oh, Dr. J, he won a championship.’ But to get that context of there were people who were doubting him and then he proved them all wrong. It’s little stuff like that you don’t know about until you go and watch [a documentary] like that.

Pommells agreed with wanting to see something on that era, but wasn’t nearly as interested in reliving The Process years.

To hell with The Process. I ain’t trying to watch nothing on that. I lived through it, I experienced all these little idiosyncrasies. I think once the Bryan Colangelo thing happened, that completely let me know that I was over it, past it, finished with it, ready to move on — because I’m just exasperated at this point. …

“It would be a black eye on the Philadelphia sports landscape.

Do you agree with Pommells? Would you rather see something on the Allen Iverson-led teams? Or way back in the Wilt Chamberlain-Hal Greer days?

For more on the debate, check out the full Sixers Talk podcast below.

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Sixers Home School: Should Andre Iguodala have won 2006 Slam Dunk Contest?

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Sixers Home School: Should Andre Iguodala have won 2006 Slam Dunk Contest?

There's a lot of home schooling going on right now, so why not use some of this time to learn more about the history of your favorite teams? In this edition of Sixers Home School, we look back at the 2006 NBA Slam Dunk Contest.

No Sixers player has ever won the NBA Slam Dunk Contest, but you can make a very good case that Andre Iguodala should have won back in 2006. In his second season, Iguodala squared off against Atlanta's Josh Smith, Memphis' Hakim Warrick and 5-foot-9 Nate Robinson of the Knicks. 

At the 11:00 mark of the video, you'll see Iguodala bring out Allen Iverson to assist him on one of the most incredible dunks you'll ever see. It took a couple tries to get it right, but Iverson throws the ball off the back of the backboard, and Iguodala comes running in from beyond the photographers to catch it and then soar through the air to dunk it on the other side of the rim. It earned Iguodala a 50 and it's fun to hear Kenny Smith, Charles Barkley and Magic Johnson going nuts. It's one of the most amazing dunks in the history of the contest.

After another impressive dunk at the 22:27 mark of the video, when Iguodala threw the ball up in the air, caught it on the bounce and went behind his back to dunk it, Kevin Harlan says "it's over."

But it wasn't over. At the 23:45 mark, Robinson calls out the original miniature dunker, Spud Webb, from the crowd. Robinson then jumped over Webb and threw down a fantastic dunk, getting the crowd on his side. Then at 27:15, Iguodala, needing a 45 to win, completed a between-the-legs lefty dunk that left the judges scrambling to decide what to do.

Kenny Smith and Clyde Drexler both gave the dunk an "8," and when the scores were added up, Iguodala received a 45, leading to a dunk-off with Robinson.

Ah, the dunk-off. From 29:00 to 33:30 in the video, you'll see Robinson try to complete a between-the-legs jump pass from midcourt, catch the ball of the backboard and dunk. He tries and fails 15 times before finally completing it. You'll get tired just watching him try and try again. Even though Robinson had to move closer to the three-point line to finally get the timing right, the completed dunk earned a 47 from the judges, meaning that Iguodala needed 48 for the win. 

At 34:55, you'll see Iguodala do a version of Isaiah Rider's "East Bay Funk Dunk" that won the 1994 dunk contest. But four of the five judges only gave Iguodala a 9, and his 46-point dunk gave Robinson the title by one point. At the 35:25 mark, you'll see Iverson say "We got robbed." Barkley agreed. Was Iguodala robbed? You can judge for yourself.

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