Adam Hermann

NFL rumors: League's nonsensical jersey rule rightly clowned by star players

NFL rumors: League's nonsensical jersey rule rightly clowned by star players

Pro sports leagues are trying to find ways to safely play games and entertain fans amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, which is obviously a tough and tall task.

But the NFL's latest proposed measure missed the mark... completely.

The league is looking to ban the popular post-game jersey swap tradition, according to NFL.com, as a proposed safety measure:

Under proposed NFL-NFLPA game-day protocols, teams would be forbidden from interactions within six feet of each other following games, and jersey exchanges between players would be prohibited, per sources informed of the situation.

If you think that sounds like a total waste of a rule, after the teams are engaged in hand-to-hand action for three hours, you're not alone.

Why the NFL feels the need to distance players after allowing them to breathe, sweat, and bleed on each other during a game is unclear. The league didn't provide an explanation.

Probably because there isn't one.

These are uncharted waters for sports leagues, and mistakes will be made, but sometimes it helps to just use common sense.

A few Eagles players were quick to point out the seeming absurdity of the rule on Twitter:

And a couple other star players from around the league chimed in as well:

Interestingly, NFL.com's Kevin Patra included this qualifier at the end of his story about the ban:

The proposed protocols are set to be in effect during any preseason action, if agreed to. As are all things during the pandemic, they're subject to change as the science, data and situations develop.

That sounds like the league already setting itself up to change the rule down the line, considering the initial reception from players. 

We'll see if it lasts an entire season.

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Sports Uncovered Podcast: How to listen to episode on Barret Robbins' Super Bowl disappearance

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NBC Sports

Sports Uncovered Podcast: How to listen to episode on Barret Robbins' Super Bowl disappearance

Had the Eagles won the 2002 NFC Championship Game, they would've faced the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXXVII, and possibly rewritten franchise history.

It also may have changed the life of former Oakland Raiders center Barret Robbins, the Pro Bowl center who spent the day before the Super Bowl bar-hopping and drinking before ultimately missing the game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. It stands as one of the strangest Super Bowl stories of all-time.

In the fifth episode of NBC Sports' "Sports Uncovered" podcast series, "The Mysterious Disappearance that Changed a Super Bowl", NBC Sports Bay Area takes a deep dive into Robbins' story, from his early diagnosis with depression in college to the self-destructive day of drinking that took him all the way into Mexico.

The episode features interviews with Robbins' former teammates like Barry Sims, former Raiders executives like Bruce Allen, and more.

The episode releases Thursday, July 9. You can listen to this episode and the entire "Sports Uncovered" series by subscribing for free wherever you listen to podcasts.

To catch every episode, be sure to subscribe to "Sports Uncovered" and have every episode automatically downloaded to your phone. Sports Uncovered is available on the MyTeams app and on every major podcasting platform: Apple, Google Podcast, iHeart, Stitcher, Spotify, and TuneIn

Listen and subscribe to the "Sports Uncovered" podcast:

DeSean Jackson's recent Instagram activity raises questions about his apology

DeSean Jackson's recent Instagram activity raises questions about his apology

DeSean Jackson issued multiple apologies this week after posting anti-Semitic messages attributed to Adolf Hitler and Louis Farrakhan to his Instagram stories.

But Jackson's recent Instagram activity since his apologies raises a question about the sincerity of the apologies.

Jackson recently liked an Instagram post, uploaded Wednesday around 1 p.m., that suggests Jackson doesn't need to apologize for posting anti-Semitic messages to his Instagram.

Brandon Lee Gowton of Bleeding Green Nation first noticed the like.

Here's a look at the Instagram post:

On Thursday morning, Jackson posted two clips to his Instagram story of the T.I. song "My Life" featuring Daz Dillinger. His posts included a line from the song's chorus, "Can't ya see I'm on fire, so quit hating on me pimpin', I'm just living my life".

This all comes after the Eagles released a statement Tuesday morning calling Jackson's posts "appalling" and urging him to apologize. Jackson issued multiple apologies, admitting he "unintentionally hurt the Jewish community" and promising to "fully educate" himself.

It seemed, after his apologies, that Jackson realized he'd made a serious and unacceptable mistake. The way he's followed up his apologies is cause for a little concern.

Because, as NBC Sports Philadelphia's Reuben Frank noted Thursday, Jackson's posts hurt and affected millions of people, and they aren't going away any time soon:

No matter what your opinion of DeSean Jackson’s social media posts, no matter how you feel the Eagles should discipline him — if at all — one thing is indisputable.

This will follow D-Jack around long beyond the end of his football career.

It would probably benefit Jackson to lean more into contrition than into resistance in the coming days and weeks.

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