Dan Roche

Harpers Ferry Brewing in Northern Virginia has 'Sell The Team' IPA to troll Redskins owner Dan Snyder

Harpers Ferry Brewing in Northern Virginia has 'Sell The Team' IPA to troll Redskins owner Dan Snyder

The reasons to not like the Redskins are innumerable. One thing Eagles fans can all agree on is that so long as Dan Snyder continues to own the Redskins, the team will continue to stink, which is great.

Redskins fans understand this. They hate Snyder as much (if not more) as Eagles fans love him. You don’t have to look hard online to find a website hocking T-shirts/sweatshirts/coffee mugs/infant onesies emblazoned with the words “Sell The Team” in burgundy and gold.

Now a brewery in Northern Virginia has jumped into the fray. Wednesday, Harpers Ferry Brewing of Hillsboro, Virginia, will release "Sell The Team" IPA. Hilarious enough on its own, and the brewery’s write-up of its latest concoction takes it to another level:

And at 9.5 percent ABV, it’s the perfect beverage to wash down a generation of tears and disappointment.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

Phillies' 40-year drought of homegrown pitchers is appalling

Phillies' 40-year drought of homegrown pitchers is appalling

Andy MacPhail’s mantra during his four seasons as Phillies president has been “grow the arms, buy the bats.” You can’t argue the team has made the effort to purchase and trade for position players, to varying degrees of success. General manager Matt Klentak added big names at four starting spots over the winter, spending big money (and prospects) in the process.

The “growing the arms” part of MacPhail’s statement has proven problematic. The farm system doesn’t exactly have a plethora of major league-ready pitchers waiting in the wings. Surely, if they had, with the season the big-league club has had on the mound, we would have seen them by now.

Upon further review, this is an organizational problem that goes back, seemingly from the franchise’s inception 136 years ago. Looking at the 2008 World Series-winning roster, the team had four homegrown pitchers on the staff: starters Cole Hamels, Brett Myers and Kyle Kendrick, and Ryan Madson out of the bullpen.

The 1993 pennant-winning Phillies had exactly zero homegrown pitchers that made significant contributions. None.

With the help of Baseball-Reference.com, we examined the last 40 years of Phillies baseball — which featured two World Series wins, five pennants and nine playoff appearances. The results are staggering.

Top 10 Phillies homegrown pitchers over the past 40 seasons by career WAR:

1. Cole Hamels - 42.4
2. Aaron Nola - 19.2
3. Kevin Gross - 13.5 
4. Randy Wolf - 11.9
5. Brett Myers - 9.8
6. Ryan Madson - 8.9
7. Don Carman - 8.0
8. Kyle Kendrick - 5.9
9. Hector Neris - 5.5
10. Ricky Bottalico - 5.2

When you consider that this factors in 40 years of drafts, 40 years of scouting, both stateside and internationally, it’s even more appalling. In the MLB amateur draft alone, I estimate the franchise has drafted more than 1,000 pitchers over that span. Think about that. Even by blind luck, a team should be able to do better than the Phillies have. 

Looking at this list, from 40 years of scouting, it’s a wonder the franchise has had the success it experienced during that time.

This is an indictment of the entire organization, its talent evaluation process and its developmental programs. This talent drought has gone on too long. It’s long past time for the Phillies to evaluate the way they evaluate.

Start growing some doggone arms.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies

Phillies' Cesar Hernandez deserves his first MLB All-Star Game nod

Phillies' Cesar Hernandez deserves his first MLB All-Star Game nod

The calls came out from fans in mid-April. Cesar Hernandez stumbled out of the gate to the tune of 5 for 37, and the hometown faithful wanted Scott Kingery to be the everyday second baseman, and it wanted to send Hernandez out of town on the first thing smoking.

Manager Gabe Kapler stayed the course — he hasn’t made a ton of changes to the starting eight this season — and Hernandez rewarded Kapler’s faith by bouncing back in grand fashion.

Since April 10 — a span of 47 games — Hernandez is hitting .321. Amid some streaky stretches up and down the Phillies' lineup, Hernandez has been one of the few dependable contributors. That production hasn’t gone unnoticed by the skipper.

“Without Hernandez, I don’t know that we’d be in the position that we’re in,” Kapler said earlier this week. “He’s been a consistent on-base threat, pretty much the entire season. Earlier in the season, there were some struggles and I understood why it took a lot of courage for him to dig himself out of it. He’s been a catalyst for us. I think he’s done a really good job.”

Voting for the All-Star Game began this week, and whether he’s voted in by fan balloting or not, Hernandez should represent the Phillies at the Midsummer Classic in Cleveland in July.

Among NL second basemen, Hernandez ranks first in batting average and OBP, is tied for first in hits and doubles, is second in slugging percentage and tied for second in RBIs.

No matter how you feel about Hernandez, he has had the best hitting season among second basemen in the National League, and should be the first Phillies infielder to make the All-Star Game since Chase Utley in 2014.

You can vote here five times per day until June 21 at 4 p.m.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Sixers, Flyers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies