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Iconic Michael Jordan weightlifting photo detailed by photographer Andrew Bernstein

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Iconic Michael Jordan weightlifting photo detailed by photographer Andrew Bernstein

Michael Jordan, in a crisp white Air Jordan tank, shoulder presses 65-pound dumbbells. 

Behind him is longtime trainer Tim Grover. Over his right shoulder stand former NBC reporter Ahmad Rashad and Hall of Fame sportswriter Jack McCallum. 

It is an iconic photograph captured nearly 30 years ago by Hall of Fame photographer Andy Bernstein. 

“Man, Michael is ripped in this picture,” Bernstein said. “Look at those biceps! Tim was doing his job.”

Bernstein explained how he gained access to photograph moments like this on The Habershow podcast with NBC Sports national NBA Insider Tom Haberstroh.

“A lot of this has to do with trust that I’ve earned, especially with Tim,” Bernstein said. “The trainer rules the room.”

Listen to The Habershow here:

Bernstein, who is on Instagram as adbphotoinc, explained why the image remains popular nearly 30 years later. 

“There aren’t really any other still photos that exist of Michael lifting like this,” Bernstein said. “I had the same experience with Kobe too because he was also very private with his weight lifting regimen.”

Here are the timestamps for Haberstroh’s interview with Bernstein:

4:20 -- Hazards of champagne celebrations

13:50 -- Michael Jordan the Piano Man

29:00 -- The famous MJ lifting photo

34:28 -- Kobe memories

46:40 -- LeBron’s scissor-kick dunk photo

1:02:07 -- Why Phil Jackson hated strobe lighting

For more on Jordan, listen and subscribe to the trailer of Sports Uncovered:

Michael Jordan vs. Charles Barkley was a one-sided affair

Michael Jordan vs. Charles Barkley was a one-sided affair

Michael Jordan dominated every Hall of Famer he faced, including the 20 fellow members he eliminated from the playoffs throughout his career. However, some superstars fared worse in their career matchups than others.

Charles Barkley finds himself at the bottom of the list as Jordan averaged 35.8 points against him in their 55 career matchups. Jordan logged his points per game record versus Hall of Famers against Chuck with 41 points in the 1993 NBA Finals.

While Sir Charles struggled against Jordan, Shaquille O'Neal held Jordan to an average of 28.7 points per game in their 21 career matchups, the lowest of those 20 Hall of Famers Jordan eliminated.

This ought to stir up some competition on the next episode of "Inside the NBA."

Listen to The Habershow here:

Was Jerry Krause's portrayal fair in 'The Last Dance'?

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NBC Sports

Was Jerry Krause's portrayal fair in 'The Last Dance'?

“The Last Dance” showed behind-the-scenes footage of Michael Jordan and his Chicago Bulls teammates openly mocking general manager Jerry Krause. 

The Athletic’s David Aldridge, who made frequent appearances in the documentary, believes that Krause never got the credit he deserved. 

“Jerry Krause just kind of gets reduced to this overweight punchline,” Aldridge said on The Habershow podcast with NBC Sports national NBA Insider Tom Haberstroh. “Who in their right mind would think that’s a fair fight between Michael Jordan, who is only the most popular person on earth, the most charismatic athlete in the world, this incredibly good-looking, glib, smart great basketball player versus this short, fat, uncommunicative front office guy nobody has ever heard of? How is that a fair fight?”

Aldridge pointed out that Krause’s biggest gambles, such as firing coach Doug Collins, paid off. 

“Jerry Krause didn’t draft Jordan, but he put everything else in place around him on that team starting with Phil Jackson,” Aldridge said. “People forget now, he fired a guy who was in the Eastern Conference finals, a pretty damn good coach, and he fired him for a guy who had never been an NBA head coach ever before. That takes some doing.”

Listen to The Habershow here:
 

Aldridge, who was awarded the Curt Gowdy Media Award by the Basketball Hall of Fame, is aware of the role that the media played in the way Krause is remembered. 

“He was terrible to the beat writers, and not much better with the columnists in town,” Aldridge said. “So when it came to the time where somebody has to stand up for Jerry Krause, there was nobody because they all couldn’t stand him.”
 
Here are the timestamps for Haberstroh’s interview with Aldridge:
 
8:45 -- The flu game ... or pizzagate?

25:23 -- The best behind-the-scenes footage in “The Last Dance”

34:15 -- The list of everything MJ took personally

38:46 -- What about the Wizards?

40:40 -- Could the Bulls have stayed together in 1999?
 
For more on Jordan, listen and subscribe to the trailer of Sports Uncovered’s “I’m Back” episode: