Reuben Frank

Howie Roseman needs to avoid major mistake with Jason Peters

Howie Roseman needs to avoid major mistake with Jason Peters

If Reggie White had been an offensive lineman, he would have been Jason Peters.

J.P. was that good.

During that stretch from 2009 through 2016, no left tackle in the NFL was better. Very few have ever been better.

Unimaginably strong, impossibly agile. He seemed closer to a mythical superhero than just a big strong dude playing a game.

Now? Now Jason Peters is just an above-average left tackle. Maybe the 12th- or 13th-best left tackle in the game.

Which isn’t bad at all. But he’s not nearly the player he once was, and when the greatest of all begins that inevitable decline, that’s never easy to watch.

And it’s never easy saying good-bye.

But the Eagles HAVE to say good-bye to Jason Peters.

It’s time.

“Me personally, one of my weaknesses is getting attached to our players,” Howie Roseman, Jan. 8, 2020

Roseman and Doug Pederson both spoke at the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis on Tuesday about Peters, and neither sounded like they were ready to let go quite yet.

Pederson said simply he wants Peters back.

Howie said Peters is a “Hall of Fame player and a Hall of Fame person, someone who’s very special to us, played at a very high level this year.”

One of the biggest mistakes a GM can make is basing decisions on emotion instead of on cool, level-headed analysis.

In the wake of a season in which the Eagles re-signed Peters, Darren Sproles and DeSean Jackson, Roseman conceded last month that he's tended to let emotions affect his decision making.

Andy Reid told me once that a head coach should never hire his friends as assistant coaches because you never want to have to fire your friends.

You can’t keep players just because of what they meant to the franchise in the past or how much you personally admire them or because of what kind of player they used to be. You’re not going to win if you build a team that way.

“We need to infuse youth in this team,” Howie Roseman, Jan. 8, 2020

Roseman said all the right stuff when he spoke just a few days after the playoff loss to the Seahawks.

He seemed to understand his own mis-steps in trying to build a post-Super Bowl roster, and he seemed determined not to make them again.

The Eagles began the 2019 season as the 3rd-oldest NFL team and finished it as the NFL’s most injured team, and Roseman was very clear last month about the challenge he faced shedding aging players, identifying young talent and building a younger, faster, healthier team.

There’s nobody those concepts apply to more than Peters.

You can’t stand up there and talk about infusing youth into the team and then re-sign a declining 38-year-old left tackle who’s missed all or a significant part of 23 games since the start of 2017.

If Howie Roseman is serious about getting younger and faster and healthier and building a team that can stay together for the next few years, Jason Peters can’t be this team’s left tackle in 2020.

“You have to let young players play,” Howie Roseman, Jan. 8, 2020

The Eagles just 10 months ago traded the 25th pick in the 1st round and 4th- and 6th-round picks to the Ravens to move up to No. 22 and draft Washington State offensive tackle Andre Dillard. He played three games in place of an injured Peters in 2019 and was very good. He tried to play right tackle after Lane Johnson got hurt, and it was a disaster.

But the worst thing you can do to the 24-year-old Dillard is bury him on the bench behind Peters and stunt his development.

Why trade up for the guy if you're not going to play him? Why invest the money and time and resources just to let him sit and watch the aging, injury-plagued Peters? You have Dillard’s rights for five years and you’re really going to spend (at least) 40 percent of that period letting him ride the bench?

That’s not how you build a football team, and Howie knows it.

You don't essentially trade up for a guy and then bench him for a 38-year-old fading superstar.

It’s time.

And when Howie says things like: “One of my weaknesses is getting attached to our players,” and, “We need to infuse this team with youth,” and, “You have to let young player play?”

That’s all terrific advice.

Howie needs to listen very closely to his own words.

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Howie Roseman finally addresses Jadeveon Clowney hit: 'We're sick to our stomach'

Howie Roseman finally addresses Jadeveon Clowney hit: 'We're sick to our stomach'

Finally, somebody from the Eagles addressed the Clowney hit.

And, wow, did Angelo Cataldi get Howie Roseman fired up.

In the weeks since the playoff loss to the Seahawks, neither Roseman or Doug Pederson or anybody else in the organization had addressed Jadeveon Clowney’s first-quarter cheap shot that ended Carson Wentz’s season and essentially ended the Eagles’ season.

After the game, Doug Pederson said: “No comment. I really didn’t see it.”

Clowney wasn’t penalized or fined for the hit, but he clearly lowered his head into Wentz’s helmet, causing Wentz to leave the game with a concussion.

By the time Pederson and Roseman met the media a few days later, the focus was on Doug's coaching staff, Malcolm Jenkins’ contract situation and the impending training staff overhaul.

On Wednesday morning, Roseman appeared on the 94 WIP Morning Show, and Cataldi told Howie that Eagles fans can’t truly have closure on the season until someone from the Eagles addressed the Clowney hit.

Howie's response:

“We thought that was a foul. We’re sick to our stomach about the way our season ended for our team and Carson in particular, but we’re not in a position to lose draft picks, dude. I can’t do that. I can’t do that. So you’re going to get me in a situation where I’m going to say something and I’m going to lose draft picks, we’re going to lose money, we’re going to get fined, I can’t do that. That doesn’t make sense either. Because it doesn’t put us back in time. I don’t have that Back to the Future time machine where I can go back in time and change it.”

Wentz finally made it to the playoffs healthy in his fourth NFL season, but his postseason debut lasted just three passes.

With Wentz out of the game, Josh McCown made his own NFL postseason debut in his 18th season and did some good things, but the Eagles lost 17-9.

Cataldi said he sensed a disconnect between the Eagles and the fan base because nobody from the franchise had condemned the Clowney hit or said it should have been a penalty.

“I’m sick about it,” Roseman said. “Doug’s sick. Jeffery’s sick about it. Our whole organization is sick about it. We’re there, we have a home playoff game, eight plays in? Come on. You know that. There’s no disconnect. We’re sick about it. Should have been a foul. … I have a knot in my stomach talking about it. You’re killing my morning.”

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Hall of Fame reveals lame plan for Harold Carmichael induction

Hall of Fame reveals lame plan for Harold Carmichael induction

Harold Carmichael and the other Centennial inductees into the Pro Football Hall of Fame will be enshrined on Sept. 18, the Hall of Fame announced on Tuesday.

That's six weeks after the traditional Hall of Fame summer festivities.

The modern-era players will be enshrined on the usual first preseason weekend, which this summer is Aug. 8, in conjunction with the Hall of Fame Game.

The Centennial enshrinees, unfortunately, will be relegated to a Friday evening two weeks into the regular season and won’t be part of the annual Hall of Fame festivities that honor the greatest players in football history.

The Hall of Fame hasn’t specifically announced the schedule for that evening but according to a press release issued on Tuesday morning, the festivities will include “world-class performances from a variety of music icons.”

Oh boy.

The press release said ticket information to attend the induction of Carmichael and the other all-time greats was not available yet.

Carmichael is only the 7th player who spent more than half his career with the Eagles to make it to Canton. The others are Steve Van Buren (1965), Chuck Bednarik (1967), Pete Pihos (1970), Tommy McDonald (1998), Reggie White (2006) and Brian Dawkins (2018).

Carmichael spent the 1971 through 1983 seasons with the Eagles after getting drafted in the 7th round out of Southern University. He was named a wide receiver on the NFL’s 1980s all-decade team and is also on the Eagles' 75th anniversary team named in 2007.

During his 12 seasons with the Eagles, he caught 589 passes for 8,978 yards and 79 touchdowns -- all still franchise records. He led the NFL in catches and yards in 1973 and made four Pro Bowls.

The other centennial inductees are Jimbo Covert, Bobby Dillon, Cliff Harris, Winston Hill, Alex Karras, Donnie Shell, Duke Slater, Mac Speedie and Ed Sprinkle.

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