Carson Wentz

Eagles vs. Redskins 2019: TV schedule, storylines, game time and more

Eagles vs. Redskins 2019: TV schedule, storylines, game time and more

The Eagles (6-7) are visiting the Redskins (3-10) at FedEx Field on Sunday afternoon. 
 
Here’s everything you need to know:  

•12 p.m.: Eagles Pregame Live on NBCSP
•1 p.m.: Eagles at Redskins on FOX 
•4 p.m.: Eagles Postgame Live on NBCSP 
•10 p.m.: Birds Outsiders on NBCSP 
 
The FOX broadcast crew for this game is Thom Brennaman (play by play), Chris Spielman (analyst) and Shannon Spake (sideline). You can also stream the game on FuboTV.
 
Merrill Reese, Mike Quick and Howard Eskin will have the call on 94WIP. 
 
The Eagles opened as 6-point favorites in some places but that has slipped to around 4 1/2 points. The over/under is 39. 

The referee for Eagles-Redskins is second-year referee Shawn Smith. This is his first game reffing an Eagles game. The Eagles were 2-1 with him as an umpire in 2016 and 2017. 

Keep it going

The Eagles got off to a terrible start against the Giants last week before they turned it around, scoring the last 20 points of the game and getting a huge overtime win. So which team shows up on Sunday? The team that fell behind 17-3 to the Giants or the team that rallied to a win? 

It’ll be key for the Eagles to find what works for Carson Wentz in this game a little earlier. They got him into rhythm last week, but that didn’t happen until the third drive of the third quarter. 

No receivers left 

The Eagles began the season with DeSean Jackson, Alshon Jeffery and Nelson Agholor. That was nice for that one game. Going into Week 15, with Agholor’s status uncertain, the Eagles’ top three receivers might be J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Greg Ward and Rob Davis. Not exactly what the Eagles had in mind this offseason. 

A rookie QB 

The last time the Eagles faced Washington, in the opener, Case Keenum was the starter. So this will be their first time facing rookie quarterback Dwayne Haskins. While the Redskins have won two of three, they’re still a mess of an organization, so who knows what the future holds for Haskins. They have an interim coach and it’s possible the next head coach will want to pick his quarterback, which could leave Haskins in limbo. But there’s also a possibly Haskins is still their long-term QB. It’ll be interesting to see what happens down there.  

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Alshon Jeffery to undergo foot surgery, faces lengthy rehab

Alshon Jeffery to undergo foot surgery, faces lengthy rehab

Eagles wide receiver Alshon Jeffery, who suffered a season-ending foot injury in the Eagles’ win over the Giants Monday night, will undergo surgery to repair his Lisfranc injury, Doug Pederson said Friday.

“He would want to get it done quickly so he can get on a rehab schedule,” Pederson said.

It’s impossible to tell when Jeffery might return, but this is generally a long rehab. 

A University of Pennsylvania study of 28 NFL players who suffered Lisfranc injuries determined that the average player misses about 11 months. Some miss less, some miss more.

According to the study, 22 of 28 players who were identified with this injury had surgery, and those players generally took longer to return to action than those who didn’t, likely because their injuries were more serious in the first place.

The start of the 2020 season is about nine months away, so although the start of his season appears in jeopardy, Jeffery would appear to have a chance to play at some point next year.

Pederson said it was too early to speculate on Jeffery’s possible return: “I don’t have a rough sense yet on when that would be. It’s a long way away.”

Meanwhile, receiver Nelson Agholor, who missed the Dolphins game with a knee injury, does not look likely to return Sunday.

Agholor said on Thursday his knee was at a “stalemate.”

“We’ll work through today and see where he’s at,” Pederson said. “Obviously, he hasn’t worked the last couple days. I’m not sure what statement means, but we’re still working through it.”

Pederson also said running back Jordan Howard is still not cleared for contact, so he’ll miss his fifth straight game since suffering a stinger against the Bears back on Nov. 3.

Pederson was asked if the Eagles, with just three regular-season games remaining, were close to shutting down Howard or Agholor and opening up roster spots.

“Yeah, we’re kind of getting down here to the end, obviously,” he said. “I understand the question. But I think my hope is that they return and return soon so that we can get them back. I lean more that way of getting a player back than trying to free up a spot and he gets healthy he can play.”

Pederson indicated that the Eagles don’t plan on activating another wide receiver from the practice squad.

Right now, they have just J.J. Arcega-Whiteside, Greg Ward and Robert Davis healthy and expected to play Sunday. Those three have played a combined 21 games in their career.

Other skill players in uniform Sunday will be tight ends Zach Ertz and Dallas Goedert, running backs Miles Sanders, Boston Scott and Jay Ajayi and hybrid tight end/receiver Josh Perkins. 

“I look at it as nine bodies with tight end, runners and receivers, so we’ve got everything covered that way,” he said. “We’ve got a plan to the plan to the plan to the plan if we lose a guy in the course of the game. It’s where we are right now as a team, as an offense.”

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Cooking up on-field comfort food with Carson Wentz

Cooking up on-field comfort food with Carson Wentz

Doug Pederson called Monday night’s 23-17 win over the Giants the best game of Carson Wentz’s career but it certainly didn’t start that way. 

After the Eagles’ second drive of the third quarter, Wentz was actually struggling. 

So what changed? 

Well, the Eagles’ offensive coaches cooked up some “comfort food,” as offensive coordinator Mike Groh called it, for Wentz. 

“I wouldn't want to give away any game-plan secrets there,” Groh said. “But I'm sure you can speculate a little bit as to what those things might be. But try to find easy completions where you can get the ball out of your hand in rhythm and once you get one or two of those, a lot of times you just kind of settle in the game. And then the game comes to you.”

Rhythm can be an important thing for quarterbacks and Wentz is no different. Groh said we could speculate and it isn’t hard to figure out how the Eagles were finally able to get Wentz into a rhythm in the second half on Monday. 

On the third drive of the third quarter, the Eagles began to use an up-tempo offense and utilized short throws and screen passes. 

It worked. 

Just take a look at Wentz’s splits before that drive and after it began: 

Before: 12/23, 98 yards, 63.3 passer rating 

After: 21/27, 227 yards, 2 TDs, 126.4 passer rating 

First, the tempo really seemed to work. The Eagles have used the no-huddle plenty during Wentz’s four years in Philly and it’s just up to Pederson’s discretion. They have even opened games with it before. 

“That’s one thing I’ve always loved about coach since I’ve been here is he has a feel for when we need something to change,” Wentz said. “When we’re struggling. Sometimes we do tempo early because that’s what we see when we’re scouting other teams, that’s what we see is going to work. Sometimes we get to it later in games. Some games we don’t even use it. I think coach has a really good feel for it. I think that was the case the other night. I think that definitely helped us get out of the rut we were in.”

Aside from going with tempo, the Eagles made life easier on Wentz with shorter passes. There were plenty of easy reads, screens and throws to the flat. Those aren’t necessarily all easy throws to make, but they’re also not 20 yards downfield. 

On the tempo drive and the one that followed it, the Eagles seemed to get Wentz in a rhythm. None of the first eight passes on those two drives traveled more than 10 air yards.  

Against the Giants, this is what worked. But the specifics sometimes change. 

“The so-called 'comfort food,' it’s all based on what coverages we’re getting, how teams play us,” Wentz said. “But that concept, just finding completions, finding a way to get into a rhythm. Like I said, each week is always different, but there’s always those completions within a game that do kind of get you going and get you going in the right direction.”



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