Eagles

Eagles

It’s rare that we see this side of Carson Wentz.

The pissed-off side.

Wentz was definitely angry at the way his concussion test was handled late in the second quarter of the Eagles-Falcons game Sunday night in Atlanta.

On a 3rd-and-10 with 1:51 left before halftime, Wentz threw incomplete to Mack Hollins, setting up an Eagles punt.

Wentz went over to the sideline and stayed there uneventfully while the Falcons went 3-and-out.

But at some point late during that Atlanta drive, the NFL’s neurosurgeon assigned to watch players’ behavior for possible concussions and then having them tested, instructed Wentz to enter the medical tent.

This coincided closely with the Falcons’ punt.

So when the Eagles returned to the field with 43 seconds left, Josh McCown was at quarterback.

If the concussion specialist saw concerning behavior from Wentz, why not have him tested immediately?

Good question.

Honestly, that was super frustrating,” Wentz said. “I was sitting on the sideline for about five minutes and then they called down to look at that. To me that is something that they need to figure out. It’s incredibly frustrating when I feel fine, but I understand that they need to look at that and that it is part of the game. But the fact that it took so long is really frustrating.

McCown played six snaps and actually converted a couple first downs as he drove the offense from the Falcons’ 41-yard-line down to the 13.

Wentz finally returned and a second later Jake Elliott hit a field goal to bring the Eagles within four points at 10-6,.

 

Head coach Doug Pederson said the Eagles will have conversations with league officials to try to figure out why things went the way they did.

“We'll have communication obviously about it, but that stuff is out of our control,” he said. “If they see it, they are going to pull the player and it's out of our control. It's out of my hands. I can't do anything about it. It's a medical issue. It's a player-safety issue. I'm sure we'll have discussions on it but quite frankly, it's out of our hands.”

Wentz seemed upset that in his eyes he wasn’t showing any concussion symptoms, but he and Pederson were most upset about the delay.

Why not call Wentz into the tent immediately when he got back to the field? He certainly doesn’t think he began displaying symptoms five minutes after leaving the field.

“That's the part we have to have communication and dialogue with and make sure they are seeing the same things we're seeing,” Pederson said. “But again, it's out of our hands when the spotter sees something.”

The NFL's concussion testing protocol has come a long way, and that's a positive.

But when it starts affecting when a perfectly healthy star player can go back on the field, there's a problem. A big problem. And the NFL needs to figure that part of this out in a hurry.



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