Eagles

Breaking down the interesting contract Malik Jackson just signed

Breaking down the interesting contract Malik Jackson just signed

The Malik Jackson deal looks like a five-year contract but is really a three-year contract that can become a two-year contract.

According to a league source who is familiar with the deal, Jackson's contract with the Eagles initially reads like a five-year, $50 million deal but the last two years are guaranteed to void, which makes it either a two-year, $20 million contract or a three-year, $30 million deal.

First, the basics:

Signing bonus: $9 million
Option bonus: $2.4 million
Roster bonus: $1 million in 2021
Guaranteed: $17 million
2019: $1 million base salary, $2.8 million cap hit
2020: $7.6 million base salary, $10 million cap hit
2021: $9 million base salary, $12.4 million cap hit
2022: $10 million base salary, $12.4 million cap hit
2023: $10 million base salary, $12.4 million cap hit

The guaranteed components are the $9 million signing bonus, the $1 million 2019 base salary and $4.6 million of the 2020 base salary, plus the $2.4 million option bonus.

The 2022 and 2023 years are dummy years that disappear and exist only to delay the cap hit.

Here’s what makes this interesting: The Eagles will have to decide what to do with that $2.4 million option bonus before the 2020 season. 

If they do exercise the option, it becomes bonus money that prorates at $600,000 per year — that’s $2.4 million over four years.

If they don’t exercise the option, the $2.4 million is added to Jackson's $7.6 million 2020 base salary, creating a $10 million base salary and making Jackson an unrestricted free agent after the 2020 season.

By structuring the deal this way, it means the Eagles almost certainly will never release Jackson. 

Why is that important? Because unless the Eagles extend him at some point, he’ll become a free agent, which means he’s added into the compensatory pick formula.

By adding the $2.4 million to Jackson’s contract, it guarantees that his average annual salary won’t go below $10 million per year even if it’s a two-year deal.

So it’s either:

• A two-year, $20 million deal: $9 million signing bonus, $1 million 2019 base, $10 million 2020 base.

• Or a three-year, $30 million deal: $9 million signing bonus, $1 million 2019 base, $7.6 million 2020 base, $9 million 2021 base, $1 million 2021 roster bonus, $2.4 million option bonus.

Whether this turns out to be a two-year or three-year contract, there will be some dead money at the end. But not a ton.

If the Eagles do exercise Jackson’s option, their dead money cap hit in 2022 would be $4.8 million — that’s two years of the $9 million signing bonus pro-rated at $1.8 million each over five years ($3.6 million) plus two years of the $2.4 million option bonus pro-rated at $600,000 over four years ($1.2 million).

If they don’t exercise his option, their dead money hit in 2021 would be $5.4 million — simply the remaining three-fifths of the original $9 million signing bonus, since the option bonus would no longer exist.

The $10 million average makes Jackson the 14th-highest-paid defensive tackle in the league. Fletcher Cox is No. 2 at $17.1 million per year.

NBC Sports Philadelphia Eagles producer Dave Zangaro contributed to this story.

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Eagles' Malik Jackson calls out NFL owners for 'unacceptable and disrespectful' behavior

Eagles' Malik Jackson calls out NFL owners for 'unacceptable and disrespectful' behavior

Eagles defensive lineman Malik Jackson posted a passionate message to his personal Instagram on Wednesday night, calling out NFL owners for what he feels is 'unacceptable and disrespectful' behavior as the league inches towards the 2020 regular season amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Jackson, who signed a three-year deal with the Eagles last March, joined a growing group of players who are voicing their discomfort with fast-approaching training camp and preseason dates.

Here's Jackson's full message:

It is unacceptable and utterly disrespectful for the owners to have set a camp start date of July 28, 2020 with no safety/ financial guarantee agreed upon for us as players, the backbone of this industry. Today is July 8 and we have no answers to simple questions we’ve been asking since this pandemic started. We (players) are sons,fathers & brothers wanting to protect our families during this unprecedented time. As Pro-Athletes we are willing and able juggle. Juggle the risk that our careers bring, the stress of the game on our minds and bodies and most important making sure we don’t neglect our families. Now, you want us to weigh putting food on the table the best way we know how which we could potentially catching the killer virus and bring it home or starve.

I can not pass Rush from 6 feet away, I cannot defeat a double team from 6 feet away nor can I tackle somebody from 6 feet away (to not do those things in practice, just in games is asinine). This sport is not in any way able to be played 6 feet away, let alone stop the transfer of sweat and blood.

Respectfully, every owner is over 40 and understandable will probably not be out there with us on the field nor in the building. I ask in this moment you see us as people not financial burdens or roster spots. Health is wealth for both parties.

Jackson joined other Eagles teammates who expressed their concern about safety measures (and financial compensation) during the pending NFL season.

On Wednesday, Eagles cornerback Darius Slay responded to a report that indicated the NFL wanted players to take pay cuts during the 2020 season, putting up to 35% of their salary in escrow:

The league has already reportedly cut its preseason slate in half, pushing the start date back to accomodate players after an unorthodox offseason. This week, Ravens quarterback Robert Griffin III tweeted that the preseason wouldn't be played at all:

It will be interesting to see if the NFL can avoid the public fighting MLB endured and play a 16-game season, or if the league is closing in on its own prolonged negotiation period and a similarly shortened season.

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The Eagles all-time team: Plenty of great tight ends

The Eagles all-time team: Plenty of great tight ends

In the next few weeks, we will be unveiling our all-time Eagles team. 

We enlisted the help of Eagles reporters Reuben Frank and Dave Zangaro, Quick Slants hosts Derrick Gunn and Barrett Brooks and Quick Slants producer Mike Mulhern for voting. 

We asked each person to rank their top five players at 16 different positions. A 1st-place vote was worth five points, a 2nd-place vote was worth four, and so on. 

Up today: Tight end 

Complete voting:

1. Zach Ertz = 24

2. Pete Retzlaff = 19

3. Pete Pihos = 14 

4. Keith Jackson = 12

5. Bobby Walston = 3

6. Brent Celek = 2

7. Chad Lewis = 1

The breakdown: 

Ertz was close to being the unanimous first-place selection but Retzlaff got one first-place vote, which he probably deserved. In fact, tight end is a pretty strong position for the Eagles. The fact that Ertz won out over Retzlaff and Pihos shows just how impressive his career has been. This will be Ertz’s eighth NFL season and he should pass Harold Carmichael for first place all-time in Eagles receptions. He’s an all-time great player and still in his prime, making the last three Pro Bowls. 

Did we get it right? 

Not a knock on Ertz, but you can certainly make a case for Retzlaff or Pihos to take the top spot. Retzlaff played a decade for the Eagles, making five Pro Bowls and two All-Pro teams. Retzlaff retired as the Eagles’ all-time leader in receptions and yards. He was a member of the 1960 championship team and his No. 44 is one of nine retired numbers in team history. 

And Pihos is no slouch either. He was a member on two championship teams and was a six-time All-Pro. He also led the NFL in receptions in three straight seasons from 1953-1955. He’s an Eagles Hall of Fame and a member of the NFL’s All-Decade team from the 1940s. 

Complete team: 

We will fill in the team as we go. 

QB: Donovan McNabb 

RB: LeSean McCoy 

WR: Harold Carmichael

WR: Mike Quick 

WR: Tommy McDonald 

TE: Zach Ertz 

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