Eagles

Brian Dawkins stepping down from full-time role with Eagles

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Brian Dawkins stepping down from full-time role with Eagles

Just a couple months before he’s set to be enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Brian Dawkins is leaving his full-time role with the Eagles. 

The Eagles announced the news on Tuesday evening, saying Dawkins will continue to be a consultant for the team, “while also pursuing other endeavors including entrepreneurship and philanthropy.” Dawkins told NBC Sports Philadelphia’s Derrick Gunn that he plans on starting a non-profit company as a part of that work.

Dawkins, 44, released the following statement: 

“I want to thank Jeffrey Lurie, Howie Roseman, Don Smolenski and Coach Pederson for blessing me with the opportunity to return to this great organization. This is a special time in Philadelphia Eagles history and I am grateful to have been a part of the team’s first Super Bowl championship — something I wanted to help bring to this great city, one way or another. I will always cherish the relationships I have within the building and it was a privilege to work side-by-side with so many great people. 

“I have put a lot of time in prayer into this decision, and after talking it over with my family and listening to the Lord, I am being called in a different direction as I take the next step in my life and career. Although I am leaving my full-time role in football operations, I will always be a part of the Eagles family and the Philadelphia community. I look forward to continuing to work with the organization as a consultant while I also pursue other endeavors that are extremely important to me and my family’s purpose to inspire hope and increase the minds, bodies and souls of so many to come.”

Dawkins was made a full-time employee with the Eagles in August of 2016 and was given the title of “Football Operations Executive” after a nine-month stint working in the scouting department. At the time, it was explained that his role would be to help with player development. Aside from that, it wasn’t uncommon to see Dawkins spending time with defensive backs on the field after practice, either. 

Speaking on NBC Sports Philadelphia’s Quick Slants last February, Dawkins didn’t shoot down the idea of one day becoming an NFL GM, which undoubtedly had Eagles fans picturing the day when their favorite player would be running the franchise. At the time, he said he didn’t want to limit himself to anything. It looks like that day isn’t coming … at least not anytime soon. 

The Eagles released the following statement on Tuesday evening: 

“Brian Dawkins will always be a Philadelphia Eagle. We greatly appreciate all of Brian’s contributions to our football operations department over the last two seasons and we are excited that he will continue to help us going forward. As an NFL Hall of Famer and a Philadelphia Eagles legend, Brian is able to provide valuable perspective and draw on his extensive experience in the NFL while working in our front office. Our doors will always be open to him and we will support him in anything he does — both professionally and personally — as he continues his post-playing career.”

Hall of Famer Harold Carmichael: 'I didn't know if I was good enough'

Hall of Famer Harold Carmichael: 'I didn't know if I was good enough'

Harold Carmichael learned back on Monday that he had finally made it into the Hall of Fame, but for logistical reasons he wasn’t allowed to tell anybody until after the official announcement on Wednesday.
 
As it happened, on Tuesday night, Harold found himself sitting next to his close friend and long-time coach Dick Vermeil at a dinner at NaBrasa Brazlian Steakhouse in Horsham.
 
For three hours.

Vermeil had just learned he didn't make it into the Hall of Fame. Carmichael had just learned he had.

And he couldn't say a word.
 
“It was killing me,” Carmichael said. “We talked about being disappointed that he didn’t get in, but I couldn’t say anything to him. He was promoting Dick Vermeil wines and we had about 160 people and they were asking me if I’d heard anything yet and I would just get off the subject. I really didn’t want to lie to anybody. I just couldn’t say anything about it. It was very, very tough for me. It’s still tough for me right now because I’m still trying to answer a lot of the texts. Got over 400 just in the past 24 hours and phone messages. My mailbox is full. They just gotta have patience. Like I did for 36 years.”
 
Carmichael’s wait is over.
 
This fall, he’ll be enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame alongside more than 300 other all-time greats.
 
Carmichael retired after the 1984 season, so he’s been eligible since 1989. Despite ranking 5th in NFL history in receptions when he retired, he was never even a finalist until this year.
 
“I didn’t know if I deserved to be in there,” Carmichael said Thursday. “I’ve been hearing I should be in there for the past 30-some years. It was not a lock for me. I didn’t know if I was good enough. I tried to do my best, but it was not for me to say I should be in the Hall of Fame. It was for me to try to put the numbers up and try to be the type of person they would want to represent the Hall of Fame.”
 
From 1973 through 1983, Carmichael led the NFL in yards (8,414), touchdowns (77) and catches (549). 
 
When he retired after playing two games with the Cowboys in 1984, Carmichael ranked 5th in NFL history in catches, 7th in yards and 7th in TD catches.
 
Today, 36 years after his last touchdown, Carmichael still ranks 24th in NFL history in TD catches.
 
This is all from a kid who didn’t get recruited to play major-college football, was a walk-on at Southern University in Baton Rouge and was drafted in the 7th round.
 
“When I got here, Harold Jackson and Ben Hawkins were the starting receivers,” Carmichael said. “They were veterans and I was trying to learn how to be a football player and questioning whether I could play in the National Football League.”
 
Now, nearly half a century later, Carmichael has been recognized as one of the greatest of all time. 
 
He’s only the 8th receiver drafted in the 7th round or later to make it into the Hall of Fame and the first whose career began in the 1970s or later.
 
Carmichael, 70, said the last 24 hours have been a whirlwind as congratulations have come in from 50 years worth of friends, teammates, coaches and associates.
 
“My son said to my wife, ‘Mom, I didn’t know so many people loved dad like this,’” Carmichael said.

More on the Eagles

Eagle Eye podcast: What’s taking so long, Doug?

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USA Today Images

Eagle Eye podcast: What’s taking so long, Doug?

On the latest Eagle Eye podcast presented by Nissan, Reuben Frank and Dave Zangaro try to figure out what’s taking Doug Pederson so long to hire an offensive coordinator. 

Some top names have already found jobs. The guys update the remaining vacancies and speculate about the Eagles’ plan and toss out one new theory. 

They also look back at the biggest lessons from the 2019 season. 

• Coaches are getting hired all over the NFL 
• Updating offensive coordinator opening
• What are the Eagles’ waiting for? 
• Lessons from the 2019 season 
• Will Jordan Howard be back in 2020? 
• Figuring out which DEs are on the bubble 
• Our championship weekend predictions 
• Harold Carmichael is finally Hall-bound
• Which Eagles player is next? 

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More on the Eagles