Eagles

Carson Wentz embraces lifestyle changes in bid to stay healthy

Carson Wentz embraces lifestyle changes in bid to stay healthy

He didn’t want to just find a way to get healthy. He wanted to find a way to stay healthy.

On Day 1 of Eagles OTAs, Carson Wentz was a full participant, practiced without a brace, threw the ball effortlessly, ran fluidly and looked for all the world like the healthy quarterback the Eagles desperately need him to be.

It’s been a long time coming for Wentz, who missed the Eagles’ playoff runs with injuries in 2017 and 2018.

And wants to do everything in his power to lower the chances of it happening again.

“I’m trying to transform my body a little bit this offseason and I think I’ve seen a lot of development there for me personally,” he said. “And I think that’ll help going forward as far as staying healthy and longevity and everything.”

Wentz said nobody really suggested a new focus on nutrition, diet and health, but he kept hearing other athletes talk about it.

So during his latest layoff and during this offseason, he started looking into changes he could make toward living a healthier lifestyle.

“Just looking at nutrition and different training techniques and really kind of diving into every aspect, any advantage I could find,” Wentz said after practice Tuesday. “I really went into this offseason and just (focused on) A) getting healthy but B) what it can look like to stay healthy."

Wentz has the ninth-most TD passes, the third-best interception ratio and the ninth-highest completion percentage in NFL history by a quarterback in his first three seasons.

But that means nothing if he’s not on the field in December, January and — hopefully — February.

“You see other guys doing it so I always was curious,” Wentz said. “It’s something that after (last) season, I’m like, ‘OK, how can I ultimately not just get healthy and get past this but just be a healthier individual going forward for my career?’ So I just dove into it."

Wentz joked that maybe one day he’ll write a book about nutrition, a reference to Tom Brady’s “The TB12 Method,” which covers things such as diet and nutrition.

But the reality is that Brady hasn’t missed a game because of an injury since 2008 and has been healthy in 18 of his 19 NFL seasons.

Wentz is 25 and has already suffered more season-ending injuries than the 41-year-old Brady.

“Obviously, a guy like Tom — and you see other athletes and they have their method — they find what works for them, and nutrition and diet and sleep and all those things are a big part of it,” he said. “So for me that’s something I’ve really been looking at this offseason and I think you’ll see benefits and hopefully add years to (my) career.”

Wentz was typically vague when pressed for details about his new regimen, but he did allow that a focus on stretching and flexibility is a big part of it.

“I’m not going to go into all the specifics, but (it includes) stretching and flexibility,” he said. “I feel good. I feel strong. I feel quick. And I think some of those things are paying off.”

Wentz has started only 25 games over the last two years, and 18 quarterbacks have started more.

In the near future, the Eagles are going to give Wentz a long-term contract presumably worth more than $30 million per year.

He has to stay healthy.

And he knows it. 

And he feels more prepared than ever to prove that he can.



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Howie Roseman finally addresses Jadeveon Clowney hit: 'We're sick to our stomach'

Howie Roseman finally addresses Jadeveon Clowney hit: 'We're sick to our stomach'

Finally, somebody from the Eagles addressed the Clowney hit.

And, wow, did Angelo Cataldi get Howie Roseman fired up.

In the weeks since the playoff loss to the Seahawks, neither Roseman or Doug Pederson or anybody else in the organization had addressed Jadeveon Clowney’s first-quarter cheap shot that ended Carson Wentz’s season and essentially ended the Eagles’ season.

After the game, Doug Pederson said: “No comment. I really didn’t see it.”

Clowney wasn’t penalized or fined for the hit, but he clearly lowered his head into Wentz’s helmet, causing Wentz to leave the game with a concussion.

By the time Pederson and Roseman met the media a few days later, the focus was on Doug's coaching staff, Malcolm Jenkins’ contract situation and the impending training staff overhaul.

On Wednesday morning, Roseman appeared on the 94 WIP Morning Show, and Cataldi told Howie that Eagles fans can’t truly have closure on the season until someone from the Eagles addressed the Clowney hit.

Howie's response:

“We thought that was a foul. We’re sick to our stomach about the way our season ended for our team and Carson in particular, but we’re not in a position to lose draft picks, dude. I can’t do that. I can’t do that. So you’re going to get me in a situation where I’m going to say something and I’m going to lose draft picks, we’re going to lose money, we’re going to get fined, I can’t do that. That doesn’t make sense either. Because it doesn’t put us back in time. I don’t have that Back to the Future time machine where I can go back in time and change it.”

Wentz finally made it to the playoffs healthy in his fourth NFL season, but his postseason debut lasted just three passes.

With Wentz out of the game, Josh McCown made his own NFL postseason debut in his 18th season and did some good things, but the Eagles lost 17-9.

Cataldi said he sensed a disconnect between the Eagles and the fan base because nobody from the franchise had condemned the Clowney hit or said it should have been a penalty.

“I’m sick about it,” Roseman said. “Doug’s sick. Jeffery’s sick about it. Our whole organization is sick about it. We’re there, we have a home playoff game, eight plays in? Come on. You know that. There’s no disconnect. We’re sick about it. Should have been a foul. … I have a knot in my stomach talking about it. You’re killing my morning.”

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Kobe Bryant told this Eagles draft target he wanted him at wide receiver for Birds

Kobe Bryant told this Eagles draft target he wanted him at wide receiver for Birds

Kobe Bryant may have spent the second half of his life in the Los Angeles area, but he was always an avid - and very public - Eagles fan. He celebrated Super Bowl LII like the rest of, screaming with joy in his living room, and he followed the team year in and year out.

So it's no surprise that, a month before his tragic death in a helicopter crash, Bryant used a serendipitous meeting at a Lakers game to make a pitch for the Eagles.

During a Lakers game Dec. 29, Colorado wide receiver and likely first-round draft pick Laviska Shenault Jr. found himself sitting next to Bryant and his daughter, Gianna, who also died in the crash. It would be the last Lakers game the two attended. 

You can see Shenault, shown here wearing a backwards hat, dap up LeBron courtside:

Shenault said Bryant spent most of the night explaining intricacies of the game to his daughter, but the Lakers legend took a minute to talk to the soon-to-be NFL star.

As the two chatted, Shenault told DNVR.com at the NFL Draft Combine this week, Bryant tried to nudge Shenault towards a possible spot on the Eagles:

On this night, Shenault got his own Kobe memory to cherish for a lifetime.

"I actually haven’t been able to talk to anybody about this, but one of the talks we had—he had an Eagles hat on, and one of the things he said was, 'Man, Philly sure needs a receiver,'" Laviska explained, raising his eyebrows and smirking in a way that helped you imagine the exact way Kobe delivered the line.

"That was so exciting for him to say that," he added. "I responded with, 'Aye, I can get the job done for you.' That was a special moment."

That's an insanely cool story. And it'll be 10 million times cooler if the Eagles, who are indeed in need of a wide receiver, manage to draft Shenault at No. 21.

Shenault, who is just 21 years old, probably grew up idolizing Kobe as the ideal image of an athlete. To have Bryant imply he'd like to root for Shenault next season was probably an absolutely surreal moment.

Also: the image of Kobe, wearing an Eagles hat and talking Eagles football courtside in Los Angeles? Just another way Bryant was dedicated to reminding people he was a Philly guy.

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