Eagles

Corey Clement can’t wait to see Eagles undrafted RBs in live drills

Eagles
USA Today Images

Believe it or not, Corey Clement is now the longest-tenured member of the Eagles running backs room and you’d understand why he might be rooting for his undrafted teammates. 

After all, just a few years ago, Clement made the Eagles roster as a UDFA out of Wisconsin and carved out a role on the Super Bowl team. 

This year, the Eagles have two undrafted rookie running backs in an unusual training camp where it won’t be easy for those guys to turn heads and make the roster. There are no preseason games so the evaluation might hinge on the two days of planned tackle-to-the-ground periods. 

And Clement can’t wait to see it:

“They’re doing an outstanding job, not just even on the offensive side but special teams. Mike Warren, my hat goes off to him,” Clement said. “Me and him are going up against each other every single day. He’s undrafted, I understand his story. He brings a certain edge and a certain connection when it comes to preparation and dominance he brings to the field, especially in his run game. I know he runs hard out there. I saw that out there, first day in pads today. I’m excited to see if we do go live one of these days this week because he’s going to be a tough guy to bring down. 

“And Adrian Killins, the guy is a roller. He can fly on the field. He’s speedy, light on his feet and he makes a lot of guys miss. I’m excited to see what the live action looks like.”

 

So Clement wants to see Warren and Killins in live periods for very different reasons, which makes sense. They’re very different players. One is thunder, the other is lightning. 

Mike Warren, Cincinnati, (5-9, 218) 

Mr. Thunder is a stout and powerful running back known for never going down easy. His legs are always churning as he runs through defenders. He’s a powerful guy. 

 

 

He got a heavy workload with Cincinnati, where he carried the rock 559 times for 2,918 yards and 34 touchdowns. In the last two seasons, he had 33 touchdowns. And he also caught 51 passes in college, so he’s not a completely one-dimensional player. 

Here’s what TheDraftNetwork’s Joe Marino said of Warren: 

“While he isn’t going to be confused as a jitterbug, Warren has impressive footwork and shiftiness for back of his stature. He is a true tank that is dominant through contact and he challenges defenders on every touch while competing for every inch. Warren has the upside to become a top-two back in an NFL stable while offering a fairly versatile skill set.”

If the Eagles want their fourth running back to be a between-the-tackles type, then the spot will likely come down to Warren and Elijah Holyfield. Holyfield went undrafted last year and after spending his season with the Panthers’ practice squad, the Eagles signed him to their active roster but he never played. Interestingly, the Eagles had draftable grades on both Holyfield and Warren.  

Adrian Killins, Central Florida, (5-8, 177) 

And now it’s time to meet Mr. Lightning. 

Killins wasn’t invited to the combine and then Central Florida’s pro day got canceled because of the coronavirus so we don’t have a real 40 time for him. Just know it would have been impressive. Apparently, he was once clocked at 4.39 by Central Florida and that checks out. 

That speed shows up on tape: 

 

 

Killins’ listed weight at Central Florida was 164 pounds and the Eagles now list him at 177, so it seems like he’s been working hard to put on more bulk for his NFL future. As long as he kept his speed, that’s a good thing. 

Here’s what The Athletic’s Dane Brugler wrote about Killins: 

“Overall, Killins doesn’t have the body type that can handle a steady workload in the NFL, but his rare speed can capture lightning on offense as a specialized weapon (swing screens, horizontal runs, etc.) and as a returner.”

At UCF, Killins carried the ball 407 times for 2,459 yards (6.0) and 25 touchdowns and also caught 70 passes for 864 yards (12.3) and 8 more scores. He also offers value as a returner. He was a kick returner at UCF, averaging 21.8 yards per return. 

Subscribe and rate the Eagle Eye podcast:  Apple Podcasts / Google Play / Stitcher / Spotify / Art19