Eagles

DeSean Jackson’s 3-year deal includes manageable cap number in 2019

usa_desean_jackson_gallery_7.jpg
USA Today Images

DeSean Jackson’s 3-year deal includes manageable cap number in 2019

DeSean Jackson’s three-year contract with the Eagles is structured similarly to Malik Jackson’s deal, with an option bonus that alters the Year 2 base salary and two fake years that defer the cap hit, according to a league source familiar with the details of the contract.

Most importantly, it includes a manageable cap hit of just $3.164 million this year.

Because of the option bonus, Jackson’s deal can operate either as a two-year, $18 million contract or a three-year, $27 million deal.

The main component of the deal regardless of its duration is a $7.17 million signing bonus that Jackson receives now as part of $17 million in guaranteed money. 

There are also $400,000 roster bonuses each year from 2019 through 2021 payable as weekly $25,000 bonuses for each week he’s on the team. There are also $400,000 annual workout bonuses.

All the bonuses count against the cap except $100,000 of the 2019 roster bonus, which is considered not likely to be earned, since Jackson missed four games last year.

As a three-year deal, Jackson has base salaries of $1.03 million in 2019, $6.2 million in 2020 and $8.2 million in 2021, with cap figures of $3.164 million this year, $8.934 million next year and $10.934 million in 2021.

The contract includes a $2 million option bonus for 2021 that they would need to exercise in 2020. If they pay Jackson the bonus, it would remain a three-year contract and would add $500,000 in pro-rated bonus money per year starting in 2020.

If they decide not to pay the option bonus, the $2 million is added to Jackson’s 2020 base salary, increasing it from $6.2 million to $8.2 million.

In that event, his 2019 cap figure would remain $3.164 million, but his 2020 cap figure would increase $10.434, since it would include the entire option bonus as part of his new base salary.

In that case, Jackson would become an unrestricted free agent after the 2020 season.

This contract structure essentially protects the Eagles from having to release players and give them a chance to gain compensatory picks by making them unrestricted free agents.

But it also protects the player because in the event he doesn’t get the bonus, he still gets the money.

The two fake years at the end of the contract serve to defer the cap hit beyond this year.  

The signing bonus pro-rates to $1.434 million per year, so if this ends up being a two-year deal, it adds up to $4.302 million in dead money in 2021 — three years worth of pro-rated signing bonus — and if it’s a three-year deal, it adds up to $3.868 million in dead money in 2022 — two years worth of pro-rated signing bonus ($2.868 million) and two years of the pro-rated option bonus at $500,000 per year ($1 million).

Jackson, 32, enters his 11th NFL season with 589 catches for 10,261 yards and 53 touchdowns. His 17.4 yards-per-catch is highest in the NFL in the last 25 years, and his 24 touchdowns of 60 yards or more are most in NFL history.

After spending his first six seasons with the Eagles, he spent three with the Redskins and two with the Buccaneers before the Eagles traded for him last week and gave him this new contract.

Jackson had one year remaining on his contract with the Bucs paying him $10 million for 2019.

In the trio of Alshon Jeffery, Nelson Agholor and Jackson, the Eagles are paying $22.16 million in base salary in 2019 with a combined cap hit of $27.27 million. 

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

Avonte Maddox loses memory to come up clutch in Eagles' win over Redskins

Avonte Maddox loses memory to come up clutch in Eagles' win over Redskins

LANDOVER, Maryland — As Nigel Bradham sprinted down the right sideline to cap off the Eagles’ 37-27 win at FedEx Field with a defensive touchdown, Avonte Maddox was running too and began to look for Eagles fans in the first few rows of the stadium. 

After the play, he jumped into the stands to celebrate. He deserved it. 

Maddox made some huge plays down the stretch … a little redemption. Because earlier on Sunday, he missed a few big ones. 

So what does it take to rebound from bad plays? 

“Short-term memory loss,” Maddox said. “That’s what it take. Don’t worry about what happened earlier and go on to the next play.”

The Eagles’ second-year cornerback missed a tackle on Terry McLaurin’s 75-yard touchdown catch in the first quarter and Steven Sims caught his 15-yard touchdown over him in the second quarter. He was on the wrong side of two huge plays. 

But Maddox made up for it late. 

On the Redskins’ penultimate drive, he broke up a deep pass on 2nd-and-10. On 3rd-and-10, he tackled Sims for a 9-yard gain to force Washington to kick a game-tying field goal. That gave the Eagles the ball back for the game-winning touchdown. 

And on the Redskins’ final drive with 32 seconds remaining, it was Maddox who flew into the backfield for a near sack on Dwayne Haskins on the aborted third-down play when Bradham took it to the house. 

That’s three huge plays in the game’s most critical moments. 

“I don’t think anybody in this locker room questions Avonte at all,” safety Malcolm Jenkins said. “He missed a tackle early in the game, they made a really good catch in the end zone. Avonte is a really consistent player, makes plays all the time. I don’t think anybody is surprised that he made those plays down the stretch.”

We always hear how important it is for cornerbacks to have that short-term memory loss, but it’s probably problematic just how often the Eagles feel the need to bring that up. You only need to have that memory loss when there’s something to forget. There’s been plenty for these corners to forget this season. 

Ronald Darby, Jalen Mills, Maddox and others have given up big plays all season. The Eagles’ defense has been good at times and bad at others. The secondary continues to be just as inconsistent. 

And this hasn’t really been a very good season for Maddox. Even aside from the friendly fire hit he took in Green Bay that forced him out for a month, he hasn’t been nearly as good as he was as a rookie in 2018. There’s probably some reason for concern. 

But on Sunday night, none of that seemed to matter. They won the game. 

Sure, the Eagles needed a comeback to take down a lowly Redskins team and have now been in close games against a bunch of bottom-feeder teams in the last three weeks. 

Sure, in those three weeks, the defense has given up an average of 27 points per game. 

“We really don’t care,” Jenkins said. “We’re not out here trying to be the 2000 Ravens or the (1985) Bears or anything like that. We are the 2019 Philadelphia Eagles. And right now, we just have to show up and be good enough to give our team a chance to win and we’ve done that the last two weeks.”

Even after giving up plays early, Maddox made plays with the game on the line. So he’ll look back at the tape and try to correct those mistakes, but on Sunday night, he got to enjoy the afterglow of a win. And he deserved it.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

'Foles this, Foles that:' Brandon Brooks' passionate defense of Carson Wentz

'Foles this, Foles that:' Brandon Brooks' passionate defense of Carson Wentz

LANDOVER, Md. — Brandon Brooks was marveling about Carson Wentz after the game.

How he could go out and throw for 266 yards, throw 3 TDs and no interceptions and rally the Eagles to a late win in the final seconds for a second straight week.

And how he could do it without Alshon Jeffery, without DeSean Jackson, without Jordan Howard, without Nelson Agholor.

And still not be appreciated?

Because ... because who knows.

I think the thing that’s hard for him,” Brooks said, “is being the face of the franchise and everybody remembering him being the MVP in the 2017 season and that’s the bar that he’s being held to that’s set and it doesn’t matter what he has around him.

Wentz the last couple weeks has played at a high level — granted against losing opponents — while working with a rookie running back and three receivers and a running back who were on the practice squad earlier this year.

No, Wentz isn’t perfect. The fumbles are an issue. He did miss a few open guys Sunday in the first half of the Eagles’ 37-27 win. 

But to do what he’s done with what he has around him? Brooks thought it was important to remind Wentz a couple weeks ago that if he's hearing outside noise he needs to ignore it. 

I just told him, ‘Don’t ever think that any loss we ever have as a team is solely on you,’ because it’s not,” Brooks said. “The world makes it seem that way because he’s the franchise guy and he’s got all this money and he’s supposed to be X, Y and Z and Foles this, Foles that. But don’t think for a second any loss is all you. Because it’s not. And I just wanted to let him know what he’s been able to do with what he has? He’s been playing well. He’s been balling all season. So it’s really just hat’s off to you. His resilience. His toughness. His mental toughness. You name it.

Wentz was out there Sunday without a single receiver or running back that was in the NFL last year. 

That’s not actually true. Josh Perkins caught five passes last year.

But let’s be honest. Wentz is the least of the Eagles' problems.

The last couple weeks, he's made plays and found ways to win game at the end, and he's done it with a bunch of guys nobody had heard of a year ago.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles