Eagles

Eagles activate Mike Wallace off injured reserve, release two cornerbacks

ap_wallace.jpg
AP Images

Eagles activate Mike Wallace off injured reserve, release two cornerbacks

Mike Wallace, the three-time 1,000-yard receiver who was one of the Eagles’ more notable offseason acquisitions, was activated off injured reserve Monday afternoon.

Wallace had been on IR since Week 2, when he broke his ankle in the Eagles’ loss to the Buccaneers in Tampa.

Wallace told NBC Sports Philadelphia’s Dave Zangaro three weeks ago that he felt like he was close to being able to return.

Wallace was a Pro Bowler with the Steelers back in 2011 and was still a 1,000-yard receiver as recently as 2016 with the Ravens. But he never got untracked in the two games he played this year, failing to catch a pass against the Falcons despite 66 snaps and then getting hurt after just seven snaps in Tampa.

The Eagles also made these moves:

• Promoted cornerback Josh Hawkins from the practice squad to the 53-man roster

• Released cornerback Chandon Sullivan

• Released cornerback De’Vante Bausby

Wallace becomes the sixth wide receiver on the active roster, joining Alshon Jeffery, Nelson Agholor, Jordan Matthews, Golden Tate and Shelton Gibson.

Head coach Doug Pederson said earlier Monday that he expected Wallace to return to practice Wednesday, but he could have practiced without being activated. It will be interesting to see if he plays Sunday in Washington.

“I will tell that you Mike will entertain some more individual reps, Wednesday, Thursday, and see where he's at moving forward,” Pederson said.

Wallace, 32, has 538 career receptions for 8,072 yards and 57 touchdowns with the Steelers, Dolphins, Vikings and Ravens. His 15.0 career average is among the top 20 among active players in the NFL.

Hawkins
Hawkins just signed to the Eagles’ practice squad on Dec. 11. He began his career as an undrafted free agent with the Packers in 2016, when he played in 11 games, mainly on special teams.

He played a lot on defense in 2017, getting 403 reps, including three starts. He played in five games with the Panthers this year, almost exclusively on special teams.

Hawkins, 5-foot-10, 190 pounds, played collegiately at East Carolina. He becomes the 10th cornerback to spend time on the Eagles’ roster this year.

Sullivan
Began the season on the Eagles’ practice squad and was activated to the 53-man roster before the Jacksonville game in London. He played in five games, with 87 reps on defense and 53 on special teams. He started in the second Giants game and got 42 snaps.
 
Bausby
Began the season with the Bears, spent a week on the practice squad, then played in the last six games, with 146 snaps on defense and 43 on special teams. Most of his snaps came in the first Giants game (60) and the second Dallas game (61).

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

NFL rule changes: Eagles' proposed onside kick alternative doesn't get approved

NFL rule changes: Eagles' proposed onside kick alternative doesn't get approved

The Eagles’ proposal to offer teams an onside kick alternative did not get approved by NFL owners today. 

That rule change proposal has been tabled for now, according to several reports, and would not have had enough support if it came up for a vote. 

That’s a shame. Because it would have been a fun rule change. The proposed rule would have allowed teams to have an untimed 4th-and-15 play from their own 25-yard line to retain possession. They would have been able to do that twice per game in regulation. 

On Wednesday, I outlined why the rule would have given the Eagles an advantage on offense

And despite what you might think, it also would have given them an advantage on defense. Over the last four years, the Eagles have the second-best defense in the NFL in 3rd- and 4th-and-15-plus situations. Excluding kicks, they have allowed first downs on just 6.0% of those plays. 

While that proposal from the Eagles didn’t pass, they had one that did. In total, three new playing rules and one bylaw rule passed:

• From the Eagles: To make permanent the expansion of automatic replay reviews to include scoring plays and turnovers negated by a foul, and any successful or unsuccessful Try attempt. 

(This rule was implemented on a trial basis and it’s now permanent) 

• From competition committee: Expands defenseless player protection to a kickoff or punt returner who is in possession of the ball but who has not had time to avoid or ward off the impending contact of an opponent.

• From competition committee: Prevents teams from manipulating the game clock by committing multiple dead-ball fouls while the clock is running. 

• The bylaw change increases the number of players teams are allowed to return from Injured Reserve per season from two to three.

Subscribe and rate the Eagle Eye podcast: 

Apple Podcasts / Google Play / Stitcher / Spotify / Art19



Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

Longtime NFL cornerback DeAngelo Hall opens up about Michael Vick and DeSean Jackson as teammates

Longtime NFL cornerback DeAngelo Hall opens up about Michael Vick and DeSean Jackson as teammates

Longtime NFL cornerback DeAngelo Hall, who had 43 interceptions and made three Pro Bowl teams before retiring following the 2017 season, wrote this week about his five favorite teammates of all-time.

Two of them are very familiar names.

In a piece on NFL.com, Hall listed Michael Vick as his favorite teammate of all-time and also included DeSean Jackson at No. 4.

Considering that he had over 500 teammates, that's impressive! 

Hall spent 2004 through 2006 with Vick in Atlanta and 2014 through 2016 with D-Jack in Washington. He wrote about his favorite teammates in a first-person piece on NFL.com.

Here’s part of what Hall wrote about Vick:

Growing up in Virginia, I remember watching Vick play at Virginia Tech from afar (before I got there) and was mesmerized by what he did as a quarterback. When I arrived in Atlanta my rookie year, I quickly realized that everything people said about Vick was true. He was revolutionary. Sure, I was used to seeing quarterbacks run all over the field in high school and even college. It was unusual to see a player do it at the NFL level, though, and he did it all the time. I remember getting up out of my seat on almost every drive when our offense was on the field -- when the defensive players usually sat down to catch our breath on the sidelines -- because Vick was exciting as hell to watch. And, hey, we had the best seat in the house.

Vick, who went on to spend five seasons with Jackson in Philly, had one of his best seasons ever with Hall in Atlanta in 2004, when the Falcons wound up losing to the Eagles in the NFC Championship Game.

“One thing Vick didn't get enough credit for was his arm strength,” Hall wrote. “Until you're physically on the field and trying to stop Vick, you don't realize how difficult it was. I had to be in tight coverage on every route because he could throw the hell out of the ball and drop it right into the receiver's hands. I gained much more respect for that part of his game after playing with him in Atlanta early in my career.”

The Falcons traded Hall to the Raiders in the middle of 2008, but they released him after just eight games.

He signed three days later with the Redskins and spent the last 9½ seasons of his career in Washington, including three years with Jackson.

We didn't start out as great friends. That's no secret,” Hall wrote. “With Jackson being a Philadelphia Eagle for the first six years of his career and me being a DB in Washington at that time, how could we be? But when I got the chance to help recruit him to Washington in 2014 -- my then-teammate Pierre Garcon, rapper Wale and I took him out in D.C. -- I was stoked because I would no longer have to play against him. And from his first day in Washington, he pushed me and made me work in practice like no other receiver had. I generally wasn't worried about receivers out-running me, but I was with DJax. He was a younger speedster and I was a veteran who still felt like I could stay with anyone. He forced me to perfect my technique because I couldn't rely solely on my speed against him. We were both great at tracking the ball -- an aspect of my game that I always prided myself on -- and we had fierce competitions in practice. I wish that I had been healthier during our time together and that I had been teammates with a receiver of his caliber for more of my career. Iron sharpens iron -- and we bettered each other.

Jackson signed with the Redskins after Chip Kelly engineered his release from the Eagles after the 2013 season. 

Jackson caught 142 passes for 2,702 yards and 14 touchdowns in three seasons with the Redskins before spending two years in Tampa and then returning to the Eagles before last season.

Hall said Jackson “is the total package as far as receivers are concerned, in my opinion, and it's too bad he didn't reach even greater heights with the Redskins. Sure, he had two 1,000-yard receiving seasons in Washington and led the league in yards per catch in 2014 and '16 (20.9 and 17.9 ypc, respectively) but I still think DJax could've been more of a centerpiece for us during those years. Years later, he's still playing at a high level -- just with those damn Eagles again.”

Hall had four interceptions in his career against the Eagles, tied with Ricky Manning for the most vs. the Eagles in the last 20 years. He victimized Donovan McNabb, Nick Foles, Vince Young and Kevin Kolb once each.

So he might speak fondly of Vick and D-Jack, don’t expect many people in Philly to speak fondly of Hall.

Subscribe and rate the Eagle Eye podcast: 

Apple Podcasts / Google Play / Stitcher / Spotify / Art19



Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles