Eagles

How many players from Super Bowl team will get into Eagles Hall of Fame?

How many players from Super Bowl team will get into Eagles Hall of Fame?

There are 36 players in the Eagles Hall of Fame, from Bill Hewitt, who made his Eagles debut in 1936, to David Akers, an Eagle until 2010.

The 1960 team has the most Hall of Famers, with eight, and the 1988, 1989 and 1990 Eagles — despite not winning a playoff game — had seven, as did the 1961 team.

The 1948 NFL Championship team had five and and the 1949 NFL Championship team had six.

The last Eagles team with more than one future Hall of Famer was the 2009 team, with Donovan McNabb, Brian Westbrook, Jeremiah Trotter and Akers.

All of which got us thinking about the 2018 Super Bowl championship team.

How many players from that team will one day be enshrined in the Eagles Hall of Fame?

And can the 2018 team break the 1960 team’s record?

Let’s take a look at the candidates:

Brandon Brooks
Like Darren Sproles and Malcolm Jenkins, Brooks never made a Pro Bowl until he joined the Eagles. He’s now made three straight, which ties him with Jason Kelce for most Pro Bowls in franchise history among interior linemen.

Verdict: Possible

Brent Celek
Never made a Pro Bowl but played 175 games in an Eagles uniform — fourth-most in franchise history — and ranks fifth with 398 cathes and ninth with 4,998 yards.

Verdict: Possible

Fletcher Cox
Has made five straight Pro Bowls (and counting), and only Reggie White and Pete Pihos have made more. Ranks seventh in franchise history with 48 sacks, most ever by an Eagles defensive tackle. Named to the NFL Team of the Decade for the 2010s.

Verdict: Lock

Zach Ertz
Already second in franchise history with 525 catches and fifth with 5,743 yards. Has more catches than any tight end in NFL history after seven seasons. Had the game-winning TD catch in the Super Bowl.

Verdict: Lock

Nick Foles
Only started 37 games in an Eagles uniform but went 25-12, made a Pro Bowl in 2013, tied an NFL record with 7 TDs vs. the Raiders, compiled a 98.8 career postseason passer rating and had a record-setting 2017 postseason with six TDs, one INT, 73 perent completion and a 115.7 passer rating. And was Super Bowl MVP.

Verdict: Lock

Brandon Graham
Hasn’t made a Pro Bowl, but ranks fifth in franchise history with 51 sacks, has played third-most games in franchise history by a defensive lineman (12 below Trent Cole’s 155) and made one of the biggest plays in franchise history with his strip-sack of Tom Brady in the Super Bowl.

Verdict: Possible

Malcolm Jenkins
Made his first three career Pro Bowls during his six seasons with the Eagles. Had 11 INTs, 12 forced fumbles and 5 ½ sacks as an Eagle and never missed a game or a practice.

Verdict: Probable

Lane Johnson 
After two suspensions in his first four seasons, has settled in as one of NFL’s top right tackles, making three straight Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pro in 2017. 

Verdict: Possible

Jason Kelce
The three-time First Team All-Pro and three-time Pro Bowler is the greatest interior lineman in franchise history. Should get into the Eagles Hall of Fame just based on his speech following the Super Bowl parade.

Verdict: Lock

Jason Peters 
Made seven Pro Bowls as an Eagle and was a two-time First Team All-Pro. Only Chuck Bednarik has made more Pro Bowls as an Eagle. Named to the Team of the Decade for the 2010s.

Verdict: Lock

Darren Sproles 
Sproles made the Pro Bowl after each of his first three seasons with the Eagles. In all, Sproles piled up 2,790 scrimmage yards, 146 receptions, 18 touchdowns, a 4.5 rushing average and four punt return TDs as an Eagle. 

Verdict: Possible

Carson Wentz 
He’s put together a fine body of regular-season work — Wentz is the only QB in NFL history with three straight seasons of 20 TD passes and seven or fewer INTs — but Wentz’s chances of getting into the Eagles Hall of Fame depend on the postseason success he has the rest of his Eagles career.

Verdict: Possible

Eagles Hall of Famers (players only)

PK David Akers (1999-2010)
CB Eric Allen (1988-94)
LB Maxie Baughan (1960-65)
LB-C Chuck Bednarik (1949-62)
LB Bill Bergey (1974-80)
S Bill Bradley (1969-76)
CB Tom Brookshier (1953-1961)
OT Bob Brown (1964-68)
DT Jerome Brown (1987-91)
RB Timmy Brown (1960-67)
WR Harold Carmichael (1971-83)
QB Randall Cunningham (1985-95)
S Brian Dawkins (1996-2008)
E-DE Bill Hewitt (1936-43)
QB Ron Jaworski (1977-1986)
LB Seth Joyner (1986-93)
QB Sonny Jurgensen (1957-63)
RB Ollie Matson (1964-66)
WR Tommy McDonald (1957-63)
QB Donovan McNabb (1999-2009)
RB Wilbert Montgomery (1977-84)
E Pete Pihos (1947-55)
WR Mike Quick (1982 -90)
E Pete Retzlaff (1956-66)
C Jim Ringo (1964-67)
DE Clyde Simmons (1986-93)
OT Jerry Sisemore  (1973-84)
LB Jeremiah Trotter (1998-09)
QB Norm Van Brocklin (1958-60)
RB Steve Van Buren (1944-51)
CB Troy Vincent (1996-03)
OT Stan Walters (1975-83)
WR-TE Bobby Walston (1943-51)
RB Brian Westbrook (2002-09)
DE Reggie White (1985-92)
OT Al Wistert (1943-51)
C Alex Wojciechowicz (1946-50)

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Jason Kelce inspired to speak out about George Floyd after listening to DeSean Jackson

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Jason Kelce inspired to speak out about George Floyd after listening to DeSean Jackson

Eagles center Jason Kelce on Monday night was inspired to post about the death of George Floyd and subsequent protests after hearing discussion during the Eagles’ team meeting today. 

In particular, Kelce said he felt an obligation to speak out after hearing DeSean Jackson’s speech to the team. 

Here are Kelce’s full comments: 

Kelce, 32, is one of the longest-tenured players on the team and an established team leader. He does not often post on social media but felt an obligation in the wake of Floyd’s death. 

Kelce was not the only Eagles player moved by the Eagles’ team meeting on Monday. Kicker Jake Elliott also posted about it: 

It’s important during these times for white players to speak up against racism and several white Eagles have done so in the last few days. Most notably, franchise quarterback Carson Wentz spoke out against “institutional racism” on Thursday. 

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Saints' Malcolm Jenkins kneels with Philadelphia protesters in Center City

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Saints' Malcolm Jenkins kneels with Philadelphia protesters in Center City

New Orleans Saints safety Malcolm Jenkins spent Monday afternoon in Center City protesting institutional racism and last week's killing of George Floyd by a police officer.

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, was killed in Minneapolis last Monday night by a police officer in an incident caught on camera. The officer kneeled on his neck for an extended period of time while Floyd was handcuffed.

Protesters were demonstrating and rallying across Philadelphia over the weekend, and continued Monday. Jenkins also spent Sunday protesting.

On Monday, Jenkins posted a two-minute video of protesters kneeling and facing police officers, captioned "Resist," accompanied by an emoji of a raised fist.

In the beginning of the video, protesters are heard chanting, "Police, take a knee in solidarity," a reference to some police officers across the country — including in Philadelphia — who have taken knees alongside protesters.

At one point, a single woman stands up and yells at the police officers.

The video ends with the protesters chanting, "No justice, no peace."

You can watch the full video below:

Jenkins, who signed with the Saints this offseason, spent much of his time and platform with the Eagles working to enact meaningful criminal justice reform.

It's clear Jenkins wants to remain involved in Philadelphia even after leaving the Eagles. Last month, he delivered the commencement address during The School District of Philadelphia's virtual graduation ceremony.

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