Eagles

Eagles cheerleader Kyle Tanguay embraces Philly mentality in American Idol experience

Eagles cheerleader Kyle Tanguay embraces Philly mentality in American Idol experience

The Eagles cheerleading squad looked a little different in 2019 thanks to rookie Kyle Tanguay. Not only because he was the first male cheerleader the organization has had in decades, but because of his bright, contagious personality and being completely fearless in everything he does. 

The 21-year-old has only been in Philadelphia since the summer of 2017 but has completely fallen in love with the city, the fans and more importantly, the Eagles. Not even a week into his time here, he was already watching the Eagles to make friends and share a common interest. 

Little did anyone know that just two years later, he’d be cheering for the team. What’s even crazier is that he had never done something to this degree before. 

“The biggest challenge was not really knowing what to expect,” Tanguay said. “I had never done professional cheerleading in my life, I had never even done a dance team in my high school and my college doesn’t have one.”

Pretty surprising to believe, especially when he shines during every performance. 

Philadelphia had taken to Tanguay essentially overnight and those who came to cheer on the birds every Sunday, also cheered for him. Not only was he welcomed with open arms, but an unbreakable bond was also created. 

“The fans of Philadelphia are the greatest fan base in the entire world,” Tanguay said. “I think the reason that the Philadelphia fans love us so much as a squad is because it’s very clear to see that we have the same amount of passion as them.

“One thing that I appreciated about them and something that they appreciated about me was that we both shared this intense love for the Eagles. Maybe we don’t look the same, maybe we don’t act the same, maybe we have different values, but at the end of the day I’m an Eagles fan and so are you so that’s what brings us together.”

Now, with the NFL offseason in full swing, there’s a new challenge for Tanguay to face —  ‘American Idol.’

Tanguay noted that he was a newly born singer but based off of videos he had posted on social media, it seemed like he had been doing this for a while. 

How long has it been since he started?

“I think I’ve been singing since October [2019],” Tanguay said with a laugh. 

“The first time I ever sang in front of anyone that wasn’t my roommates … was my audition.

“I did chorus in high school — I never wanted a solo, I always stood in the back and I always kept to myself. I would sing in the shower, I would sing in the living room, I would really only sing in front of my roommates if we were tired and had the sleepy ha-ha’s and so for me, this opportunity presented itself and I got to go down to Washington D.C. and try out for ‘American Idol.’ 

“It was the most craziest experience ever and it really allowed me to remind myself that it’s okay to step outside your comfort zone. The experience on the show was so awesome, so exciting and it’s something that I cannot wait for the world to see.”

It was mentioned before, but Tanguay is fearless. To make your mark in the NFL and step fully outside of your comfort zone to perform in front of the top artists in the music industry within the same year is nothing short of incredible. 

This field can be tough, competitive and even make some turn away from their goals. When asked about the best piece of advice Tanguay could give those who need to stay inspired or motivated, the most sincere answer was given. 

There’s a quote that was plastered in my middle school gymnasium that said ‘stand up for something you believe in, even if you’re standing alone.’ And that is something that I’ve always carried with me.

No is only two letters. It’s a small word if anyone tells you no there’s just another yes around the corner. I’ve heard no so many times in my life. So many times in my life. It has always made the most crazy, windy path … but it’s been my path. 

It’s a mindset that not many people have at such a young age. To thrive off of being told ‘no’ and instead of being knocked down, simply changing direction to get to where you want to be is a special thing. 

Being positive is infectious, and when Tanguay left for the day, I felt inspired. Inspired to just put a smile on my face, to do something kind for someone else, to push myself a little more than what I typically do. Not everyone can say they have that kind of power — he absolutely does. 

‘American Idol’ premieres this Sunday, Feb. 16 at 8 p.m. on ABC.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

Pa. Gov. Wolf responds to Trump’s hope of normal NFL season

Pa. Gov. Wolf responds to Trump’s hope of normal NFL season

Less than a week after President Donald Trump reportedly said he believed the NFL season would start on time despite the COVID-19 pandemic, Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf isn’t so sure. 

Wolf, during his press conference on Wednesday afternoon, was asked if Trump’s timeline is realistic. 

“I think it’s too early to call what happens in the fall,” Wolf said, via PennLive.com.

Trump said he believed the NFL would start on time on a conference call Saturday with commissioners of the country’s major sports leagues, according to ESPN. Trump also reportedly said he hoped to have fans back in stadiums by August and September. 

Wolf is just the latest governor to express trepidation about the NFL’s starting on time in September — at least starting normally. 

According to ProFootballTalk, the governors of Ohio, California and Illinois have also expressed some skepticism about a normal start to the NFL season. 

California is home to four NFL teams, the most of any state in the country. And its governor doesn’t expect a “normal” start to the NFL season. 

“I’m not anticipating that happening in this state,” Newsom said Saturday, via NBC Sports Bay Area. “We’ve all seen the headlines over the last couple days in Asia, where they opening up certain businesses, and now they’re starting to roll back those openings because they’re starting seeing some spread and there’s a boomerang. One has to be very cautious here, one has to be careful not to overpromise.

"It's interesting, I have a lot of friends that work in Major League Baseball and the NFL, they've been asking me -- in fact, a well-known athlete -- a football player -- just asked me if he expects to come back. I said, 'I would move very cautiously in that expectation.'"

In addition to the question about the NFL, Wolf was also asked about winter and spring high school sports. He said every winter sport — professional and amateur — has shut down and Pennsylvania needs to follow that. 

"We need to stay safe,” Wolf said. “Again, our first priority is to keep people safe.”

Subscribe and rate the Eagle Eye podcast: 
Apple Podcasts / Google Play / Stitcher / Spotify / Art19

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles

NFL Draft 2020: Some WRs Eagles could target on Day 3

NFL Draft 2020: Some WRs Eagles could target on Day 3

The odds of finding a difference maker at wide receiver on Day 3 aren’t great. 

But it can happen.

And this draft is unique because it’s so deep up top. That’ll push guys who would normally be 1st- rounders into the 2nd round, which will push 2nd rounders until the 3rd and so on. 

So there is a chance of finding good value on Day 3, when the fourth through seventh rounds will be held.

The Eagles haven’t found many functional receivers after the third round, but Jason Avant was a fourth-rounder in 2006, Calvin Williams a 5th-rounder in 1990 and of course Harold Carmichael was a 7th-rounder in 1971 and goes into the Pro Football Hall of Fame this fall.

Brandon Marshall, Antonio Brown, Marques Colston, Pierre Garcon and Julian Edelman were all drafted in the fourth round or later.

And several Hall of Famer wideouts – Steve Largent, Charlie Joiner, Don Maynard and Kutztown’s Andre Reed – were taken in the fourth round or later.

So were Harold Jackson, Drew Hill and John Stallworth.

The Eagles currently have three picks in the fourth round – No. 127, 145 and 146 overall – along with one each in the fifth (168) and sixth (190) rounds.

The odds aren’t great. But the Eagles will have some intriguing options at wide receiver prospects when Day 3 of the draft rolls around.

Here are some of them:

Collin Johnson, Texas

Another prospect whose father was in the NFL. His dad, Johnnie, spent 10 years as a cornerback with the Rams and had 22 interceptions. Collin Johnson has crazy size at 6-6, 220, and good hands but has below-average speed. He may be strictly a jump-ball guy or short-yardage zone guy in the NFL.

Devin Duvernay, Texas

After three lackluster seasons, exploded for 106 catches, nearly 1,400 yards and 9 TDs as a senior. Only 5-11, 200 but terrific hands and speed and physical after the catch. Needs work on route running and his breaks and might take some time to develop but has the tools.

Isaiah Hodgins, Oregon State

Another son of an NFL player - fullback James Hodgins - the younger Hodgins entered the draft after a breakthrough junior year with 86-for-1,171 and 13 TDs. Has very good size at 6-4, 210 and is a technically sound and polished player, just doesn’t have the speed to match. Only six WRs ran slower than Hodgins’ 4.61 at the Combine.

John Hightower, Boise State

The All-American intermediate hurdler certainly has the wheels. Ran 4.43 at the Combine, so speed isn’t an issue. His size and strength are an issue. Hightower doesn’t project as a starting NFL receiver but could be an interesting guy as a returner, third or fourth receiver and gadget guy.

Bryan Edwards, South Carolina

Four-year starter whose production was unspectacular but steady - between 590 and 846 yards all four years. Looks the part at 6-3, 210 but prone to drops and a below average route runner. 

Antonio Gibson, Memphis

After playing two years of JUCO, had only one season as a full-time player at Memphis and caught just 38 passes, although he did average a legit 19.3 yards per catch and added 369 yards on 33 rushing attempts, highest in college football last year with a minimum of 30 carries. Had 12 TDs on just 71 touches. Intriguing long-range prospect who may have only begun scratching the surface of his ability.

Quartney Davis, Texas A&M

Sure-handed but inexperienced and unpolished prospect who turned pro after his junior year despite never having more than 616 yards in a season. Davis's position coach during his 2017 red-shirt freshman year at A&M was current Eagles receivers coach Aaron Moorehead.

Jauan Jennings, Tennessee

Big, strong slot receiver at 6-3, 215 who's able to use savvy and toughness to make some plays but is also one of the slowest receivers to test at the Combine. His 4.72 was second-slowest of the 45 WR prospects in Indy.

Subscribe and rate the Eagle Eye podcast: 
Apple Podcasts / Google Play / Stitcher / Spotify / Art19

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Eagles