Eagles

When LeSean McCoy retires, he'll retire as an Eagle

When LeSean McCoy retires, he'll retire as an Eagle

Even though he’s been gone for six years, Shady is still a Philadelphia Eagle at heart.

LeSean McCoy, whose last season in an Eagles uniform was 2014, said at Super Bowl Media Day Monday in Miami that when he retires, he’s retiring as an Eagle, according to the Inquirer’s Jeff McLane, covering Media Day at Marlins Park.

What does retiring as an Eagle really mean?

More than anything, it just means even after all these years, he still considers himself an Eagle.

McCoy could sign one of those one-day contracts for show and formally retire as an Eagle. When he retires he’ll quickly be added into the Eagles Hall of Fame. And his No. 25 - which hasn’t been worn since he left - could one day be retired.

If McCoy does ever go into the Hall of Fame — and he’s got a shot — he wouldn’t go in “as an Eagle,” only because players aren’t enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame “as” anything. They just go in.

McCoy spent 2009 through 2014 with the Eagles and rushed for a franchise-record 6,792 yards in just six years. He also set a franchise record with 9,074 scrimmage yards. He was an all-pro in 2013 and made three Pro Bowls.

Soon after Chip Kelly assumed GM powers from Howie Roseman in January of 2015, Kelly traded McCoy to the Bills in exchange for linebacker Kiko Alonso.

After four years with the Bills, including three more Pro Bowl seasons, he was released this past summer and quickly signed with the Chiefs, reuniting with Andy Reid, who drafted him in 2009.

McCoy ran for 465 yards with a 4.6 average and four TDs this past regular season but has only played one snap in the postseason and doesn’t have a carry in the Chiefs’ last four games. He was inactive for the AFC Championship Game.

This is not only McCoy’s first Super Bowl, it’s the first time he’s been on a team that’s won a playoff game in his 11-year career.

McCoy is the only player in NFL history with 11,000 rushing yards, a 4.5 rushing average and 500 receptions.

He had the most rushing yards (10,434) and most scrimmage yards (13,923) in the NFL during the decade of the 2010’s.

McCoy is now 31 and turns 32 this summer. He said win or lose in the Super Bowl, he doesn’t plan on retiring after the season, according to Kevin Patra of NFL.com

“I can still play, so I’m not going to retire yet,” he said. “But that day is coming.”

And when it does, McCoy is coming home.

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Eagles QB coach Press Taylor back at work following quarantine

Eagles QB coach Press Taylor back at work following quarantine

Not only is Doug Pederson back at the NovaCare Complex, his quarterbacks coach is as well.

Press Taylor has returned to work after being quarantined following Pederson’s positive COVID test.

Because Taylor was in close quarters with Pederson, he was quarantined away from the NovaCare Complex until a series of tests came back negative and he showed no symptoms. 

As with players, it's up to the individual if he chooses to announce whether he actually had the virus or was simply quarantined for being around someone who did.

Although there is a COVID reserve list for players who either test positive or have been in close proximity to someone who has, there is no similar list for coaches, and NFL teams are under no obligation to announce when or if any coaches have either tested positive or have been quarantined without a positive test.

Pederson and Taylor were both sent home from work on Aug. 2. Pederson returned on Wednesday.

Two of the three Eagles who were placed on the COVID reserve list on July 29 - Nate Gerry and Lane Johnson - have returned to the team. That leaves third-year offensive tackle Jordan Mailata as the only known remaining player or coach not currently with the team.

Taylor joined the Eagles as one of Chip Kelly’s offensive quality control coaches in 2013. He became offensive quality control and assistant quarterbacks coach under Pederson in 2016, quarterbacks coach in 2018 and had the passing game coordinator tag added to his title this year.

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Doug Pederson details Eagles’ 2020 training camp structure

Doug Pederson details Eagles’ 2020 training camp structure

Earlier this offseason, Doug Pederson intimated that the Eagles might have more scrimmages this summer to make up for the cancelation of the entire preseason. 

That doesn’t seem to be the case. 

In the past, Pederson has typically had two days where the Eagles go “live” and tackle to the ground. Even without preseason games, that is the plan this summer too. 

I’m going to stick to that schedule,” Pederson said via a Zoom call on Wednesday afternoon. “I’m going to stick to two days of having situational, scrimmage-type practices. I feel like it’s a great way to get our guys prepared for game situations, game action. I’m going to do two of those days.

That means there will be limited opportunities to really evaluate their young players during this training camp. 

Pederson also said there are in total eight or nine padded practices in the next 2 1/2 weeks. 

The Eagles are right now in the Gradual Ramp Up Period of training camp, which allows non-padded practices. Padded practices begin Monday (Aug. 17) when the Eagles enter the Contact Integration Period. 

If those “live” periods indeed remain similar to what Pederson has done in the past, don’t think of scrimmages as just 11-on-11 offense vs. defense, like a game. The situational part means they’ll be in goal line or backed up, etc. Pederson likes to segment practice this way. 

Pederson admitted there will be a “fine line” as the coaches try to evaluate players but also work on situational players and get ready for the season. Normally, those preseason games are huge for evaluating young players. Now, the coaching staff has to do it in 2 1/2 weeks while also preparing veteran players for the upcoming season. 

Because of that, will these practices be any more intense? 

“I don’t know if they’ll be any more intense,” Pederson said. “Training camp practices are grueling anyway.” 

That’s true. And Pederson also brought up a great point that this current setup means fewer days off once these practices get going. Normally, when there are preseason games, teams get the day before and after off. So if you’re a starter and you play 10 snaps in a preseason game, those 10 snaps are really your only significant on-field time in the span of three days. There are obviously off days built into this schedule but not that many. 

While the Eagles haven’t started padded practices yet, they have been in training camp and in virtual meetings for a while. In fact, the Eagles have completely installed their offensive and defensive schemes. 

The last thing left to do is get on the field and get ready for the season. 

“The only thing we’ve missed really is just the live practices that we would have had under a normal situation,” Pederson said. “Tomorrow, I think would have been our first preseason game. We’ve got everything that we need in if we were to play a game tomorrow. We’re not really playing catch up, we’re just enhancing what we have moving forward.”

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