Eagles

Trey Burton cashes in with NFC team

Trey Burton cashes in with NFC team

Tight end Trey Burton, who was on the front end of the greatest play in Super Bowl history, agreed to terms of a four-year deal with the Bears Tuesday, a league source confirmed to NBC Sports Philadelphia's Dave Zangaro.

The deal is worth $32 million over four years. Burton's $8 million average salary is fifth-highest in the NFL among tight ends. NFL Network's Mike Garafolo first reported the deal. 

Burton took a pitch from Corey Clement and threw a fourth-down touchdown pass to quarterback Nick Foles just before halftime of the Super Bowl, and the so-called Philly Special is now considered the greatest play in Super Bowl history or Eagles history.

But the Bears want Burton for his receiving ability, not his passing ability. He's 26 years old, so the Bears are getting a young player just entering his prime.

Burton made the Eagles as an undrafted free agent out of Florida in 2014. He caught just three passes in his first two seasons but evolved into one of the NFL’s top backup tight ends over the past two years, with a combined 60 catches for 575 yards and six touchdowns. His five TD catches this year were 10th-most in the NFL among tight ends.

Because of Zach Ertz, Burton would never be a starter with the Eagles, but he certainly has the athleticism, speed and receiving ability to project as a productive starting tight end, and the Eagles, with their salary cap situation, were in no position to get in a bidding war for a backup tight end.

Burton's new deal places him behind only Jordan Reed, Travis Kelce, Rob Gronkowski and Ertz in terms of annual average value.

He is one of only three undrafted players in history to throw a Super Bowl touchdown. The others are Kurt Warner and Jake Delhomme.

Eagle Eye Podcast: Good start for Carson Wentz and a look at the NFC East picture

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Eagle Eye Podcast: Good start for Carson Wentz and a look at the NFC East picture

On this edition of Eagle Eye, Derrick Gunn and Barrett Brooks discuss the Eagles' victory over the Colts. The guys agree that Carson Wentz looked good in his season debut. Wendell Smallwood was a pleasant surprise.

This defense will give Carson Wentz some room for error to shake off any rust.

Derrick and Barrett take a look at the NFC East picture after week three. Also, is Patrick Mahomes the only consistent thing in the NFL right now?

1:00 - Eagles win! How did Carson Wentz look?
8:00 - The defense will give Carson Wentz time to shake off rust.
12:30 - A look at the NFC East on Sunday.
19:00 - Big upsets on Sunday.
23:30 - Patrick Mahomes is the only consistent thing in the NFL?

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How Doug Pederson got a huge call to go Eagles’ way

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NFL

How Doug Pederson got a huge call to go Eagles’ way

Sometimes the squeaky wheel really does get the oil. 

It worked in Doug Pederson’s favor Sunday in the Eagles’ 20-16 win over the Colts, when the Eagles got a much-needed defensive holding call to extend their game-winning touchdown drive. 

Pederson revealed Monday morning on WIP that earlier in the game, he called over the referee to let him know that the Colts’ defensive line had been holding their offensive tackles. Pederson told him to just “be aware of it.” 

Then on 4th-and-5 at a crucial moment in the fourth quarter, that little chat ended up helping the Eagles in a big way. 

That’s a pretty clear hold. Jabaal Sheard holds Lane Johnson so Margus Hunt can get around the edge on a stunt. It works and Hunt forces Wentz to throw the ball early. 

Maybe if Hunt isn’t in his face, Wentz delivers a perfect pass to Jordan Matthews to get the first down. He probably does, but we’ll never know. If you think the Eagles get a first down, we’d have to assume Wentz’s non-pressured throw would be on the money and Matthews would catch it. Very possible, likely even, but not guaranteed. 

This penalty gave the Eagles the first down and they scored the go-ahead touchdown seven plays later. 

During Monday’s press conference, I asked Pederson if he’s strategic in bringing up these things to refs: 

No, it’s common practice. I get a chance to meet with officials before the game. I get a chance to meet with the head referee before pregame. Listen, it’s a tough job. And if there’s something out there that we see, they want to know about it so they can get it right. It’s not strategic, it’s not planned in any way. It’s something that we saw throughout the game and wanted to bring to their attention and it was a true hold on Lane and they got it right. It’s not a competitive advantage other than we just want to make sure that everything is officiated correctly. I’m sure Frank (Reich) had things on their sideline too that he could talk to them about. It’s fair game, so to speak. It’s just common practice throughout the league.

It might not have been strategic, but it’s a good thing Pederson pointed out those penalties that hadn’t been called earlier in the game. 

Holding calls on defensive linemen are pretty rare; it’s not something refs are probably super focused on during games. They’re looking for holding from offensive linemen and from defensive backs. So Pederson’s bringing it up to the officials likely put it on their radar. 

And it helped the Eagles when they really needed it.

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