Eagles

Will DeSean Jackson be a Hall of Famer?

Will DeSean Jackson be a Hall of Famer?

DeSean Jackson is the latest in a series of stories looking at the Hall of Fame chances of current or recent Eagles who are still active in the NFL.

Friday, July 19: Fletcher Cox
Saturday, July 20: Zach Ertz
Today: DeSean Jackson
Monday, July 22: Jason Kelce
Tuesday, July 23: LeSean McCoy
Wednesday, July 24: Jason Peters
Thursday, July 25: Darren Sproles

Numbers: 589 catches, 10,261 yards, 17.4 average, 53 receiving touchdowns, 4 rushing touchdowns, 4 punt return touchdowns.

Postseason numbers: Has 21 catches for 338 yards and two touchdowns in seven career playoff games, all but one with the Eagles between 2008 and 2013.

Honors: Three-time Pro Bowl pick (2009, 2010, 2013).

Favorite stat: With 1,156 yards and an 18.6 average in 2009 with the Eagles and then 774 yards and an 18.9 average last year with the Buccaneers, Jackson is the only player in NFL history with seasons of 750 yards and an 18.5 average at least nine years apart.

Records and rankings

• Jackson’s 17.4 yards per catch career average is highest in the NFL over the last 35 years.

• Jackson's 24 career touchdowns of 60 yards or more are most in NFL history (Jerry Rice had 23). He has 24 TD catches of at least 50 yards, fifth most in NFL history.

• He’s the only player in history to lead the NFL in yards per catch four times and the only one to do it for more than one team (he did it for three).

• Jackson is 45th in NFL history in receiving yards, but he’s one of only six guys ever with at least 10,000 receiving yards and a 17.0 average. Three of the five others are Hall of Famers.

• Jackson has had four seasons with 1,000 yards and a 17.5 average. Only Lance Alworth and Don Maynard — both Hall of Famers — have had more.

• Jackson has 29 total career TDs of at least 50 yards, which is one every five games over his entire career.

• D-Jack’s 6.4 career rushing average is seventh highest in NFL history by non-quarterbacks with at least 70 attempts.

Analysis

With 1,739 more yards and assuming he keeps his career average over 17.0 — and it will be hard for him not to at this point — D-Jack will join James Lofton as only the second player in history with 12,000 receiving yards and an average over 17 yards per catch.

He truly is one of the greatest deep threats in the history of the game, and his return to the Eagles and an opportunity to finish his career playing with Carson Wentz should give Jackson a chance to continue being productive late in his career.

When you ask yourself whether someone is a Hall of Famer, you ask if there’s anything he did better than anyone else in the game, and there’s never been anybody quite like Jackson.

I do think he needs two more seasons to even get himself into the mix, and I think even then he’ll always be a long shot, just because he’s not going to be one of those 15,000-yard career guys.

But he’s such a unique player and such a consistently explosive one, he definitely will deserve consideration five years after he does retire.

Verdict: Will not be a Hall of Famer. 

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Should Eagles be interested in a trade for Jalen Ramsey?

Should Eagles be interested in a trade for Jalen Ramsey?

Another good player might become available in a trade, so Howie Roseman and the Eagles’ front office should at least look at the possibility. 

Just like we talked about with Minkah Fitzpatrick last week, the Eagles are never shy about kicking tires when a quality player might be up for grabs. 

That should be no different with Pro Bowl cornerback Jalen Ramsey, who would absolutely help the Eagles. 

We’ve seen the Eagles’ struggles early this season to defend the pass. They’ve given up 680 passing yards in two games, the second-most they’ve ever given up in the first two games of a season. The Eagles have been rotating their outside corners with varied results. Ronald Darby, coming back from a torn ACL in 2018, has struggled early this season. 

Meanwhile, the 24-year-old Ramsey was the fifth-overall pick in 2016 and has been a Pro Bowler in each of the last two years and was an All-Pro in 2017. To put it simply, he’s good. And he’s much better than anyone the Eagles have right now. 

It’s also worth pointing out that the Jaguars lose plenty of leverage because this rocky relationship between Ramsey and the team is so public. That doesn’t help them get the best possible haul, but they should start by looking for a first-round pick. 

Unlike Fitzpatrick, whom the Eagles would have cost-controlled through 2022 with a fifth-year option, Ramsey is in the final year of his four-year rookie contract and is on a fifth-year option in 2020. So Ramsey, presumably, will be looking for a big-time contract soon. That’s not a deal-breaker, but it does make a trade a little more complicated. 

Ramsey certainly has a loud personality and isn’t afraid to speak his mind. That is always part of what the Eagles look at when they inquire about potentially adding a player. But the Eagles have faith in their locker room’s ability to absorb unique personalities. In that now-infamous interview with GQ last year, Ramsey gave his honest (and brutal) assessment of many QBs, but at least he spoke highly of Carson Wentz. 

Since entering the league in 2016, Ramsey has nine interceptions and 45 pass breakups. During that span, Malcolm Jenkins and Rodney McLeod are tied for the Eagles’ lead in INTs with six and Jalen Mills leads the Eagles in pass breakups with 30. So Ramsey would immediately help. 

It’s probably a long shot that the Eagles end up getting Ramsey, but based on Roseman’s history with trades, you certainly can’t rule them out. 



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An angry Carson Wentz questions NFL concussion procedures

An angry Carson Wentz questions NFL concussion procedures

It’s rare that we see this side of Carson Wentz.

The pissed-off side.

Wentz was definitely angry at the way his concussion test was handled late in the second quarter of the Eagles-Falcons game Sunday night in Atlanta.

On a 3rd-and-10 with 1:51 left before halftime, Wentz threw incomplete to Mack Hollins, setting up an Eagles punt.

Wentz went over to the sideline and stayed there uneventfully while the Falcons went 3-and-out.

But at some point late during that Atlanta drive, the NFL’s neurosurgeon assigned to watch players’ behavior for possible concussions and then having them tested, instructed Wentz to enter the medical tent.

This coincided closely with the Falcons’ punt.

So when the Eagles returned to the field with 43 seconds left, Josh McCown was at quarterback.

If the concussion specialist saw concerning behavior from Wentz, why not have him tested immediately?

Good question.

Honestly, that was super frustrating,” Wentz said. “I was sitting on the sideline for about five minutes and then they called down to look at that. To me that is something that they need to figure out. It’s incredibly frustrating when I feel fine, but I understand that they need to look at that and that it is part of the game. But the fact that it took so long is really frustrating.

McCown played six snaps and actually converted a couple first downs as he drove the offense from the Falcons’ 41-yard-line down to the 13.

Wentz finally returned and a second later Jake Elliott hit a field goal to bring the Eagles within four points at 10-6,.

Head coach Doug Pederson said the Eagles will have conversations with league officials to try to figure out why things went the way they did.

“We'll have communication obviously about it, but that stuff is out of our control,” he said. “If they see it, they are going to pull the player and it's out of our control. It's out of my hands. I can't do anything about it. It's a medical issue. It's a player-safety issue. I'm sure we'll have discussions on it but quite frankly, it's out of our hands.”

Wentz seemed upset that in his eyes he wasn’t showing any concussion symptoms, but he and Pederson were most upset about the delay.

Why not call Wentz into the tent immediately when he got back to the field? He certainly doesn’t think he began displaying symptoms five minutes after leaving the field.

“That's the part we have to have communication and dialogue with and make sure they are seeing the same things we're seeing,” Pederson said. “But again, it's out of our hands when the spotter sees something.”

The NFL's concussion testing protocol has come a long way, and that's a positive.

But when it starts affecting when a perfectly healthy star player can go back on the field, there's a problem. A big problem. And the NFL needs to figure that part of this out in a hurry.



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