Flyers

Add a stellar debut to Flyers' month to remember

Add a stellar debut to Flyers' month to remember

BOX SCORE

In his first start in a Flyers sweater, the newly acquired Petr Mrazek upstaged former Flyers goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky.

Mrazek turned back 19 shots as the Flyers held off the Blue Jackets, 2-1, Thursday night at the Wells Fargo Center. 

The Flyers came back to win after trailing entering the third period. They improved to 3-14-3 in that situation. They have earned a point in 10 straight games with a record of 8-0-2.

Claude Giroux broke the ice with his 21st goal of the game and Nolan Patrick scored the game-winner on the power play with 10:11 remaining in regulation. 

Artemi Panarin scored the Blue Jackets’ lone goal, an unassisted marker just as the Flyers’ power play had expired.

The Flyers had to make due without Travis Konecny. The top-line winger took pregame warmups, but was scratched with a foot injury he suffered in Tuesday’s win over the Montreal Canadiens. 

• Roughly a minute after Mrazek came up with a five-star save on a shorthanded breakaway, Panarin broke a scoreless tie. Panarin popped out of the box just in time to intercept Ivan Provorov’s pass to Andrew MacDonald at the blue line, which led to a 2-on-1 the other way. The incredibly-skilled Panarin never looked at the net until the very last second and sniped a shot over Mrazek’s blocker side shoulder that he had very little chance at stopping. 

• Two goals on two spectacular snipes. Giroux matched Panarin’s effort with a pinpoint effort that tied the game at 1-1. With Bobrovsky electing to drop into the butterfly, Giroux went high to Bobrovsky’s glove with such a quick release. The play opened up as Sean Couturier caught the attention of three Blue Jacket defenders, which opened up a lane down the slot for Giroux to bury the shot.  

• Patrick seems to be fitting in quite well on that top power-play unit, filling the role occupied by Wayne Simmonds. Patrick was stationed down in front when he quickly backhanded Shayne Gostisbehere’s point shot to give the Flyers a 2-1 lead. 

• An interesting sequence saw Couturier break out of the box and then skate with the puck into the Columbus zone, but for some reason the officials blew the whistle as the Blue Jackets were caught with too many men on the ice. Two minutes later, Panarin broke out of the box and scored.

• Thirty seconds into the game, Michael Raffl, who was playing on the top line, took a hooking penalty to give the Flyers an early power play. Playing Raffl on that top line seemed to be the obvious choice with Konecny unable to play. Raffl brings a different brand of game. While he doesn’t possess Konecny’s speed, Raffl makes the No. 1 line tougher to defend in the cycle game. That was a heavy line defensively for Columbus to contain.  

• It was a tale of two first-period power plays. On their first opportunity, the Flyers committed unforced errors and never had a quality shot on net. In their second attempt, they were buzzing around the net. Giroux lasered a cross-ice pass to Jakub Voracek, who tried to score on a one-timer. Against 98 percent of the other goaltenders in the league, that shot gets through.

• Jordan Weal was whistled for interference with 5:19 remaining in the first period — the first penalty called against the Flyers since Feb. 13 against the Devils. That snapped the Flyers’ streak of not having to kill a penalty at nearly 230 minutes. An underworked Flyers’ PK did not allow Columbus a SOG in killing off the Jackets’ power play. 

• Defensively, the Flyers gave up very, very little. They held Columbus without a shot on net for 14:23 of the first period. 

• Robert Hagg had a horrific turnover playing the puck from along the left boards in his own zone. Hagg’s errant pass to the middle of ice was intercepted by fourth-line call-up Zac Dalpe, who got a shot on net. Had that been Panarin or one of the Jackets’ skilled players, the Flyers could have easily trailed, 1-0, after the first period.

• Twenty-two seconds into the second period, Mrazek faced his first real shot from the slot as Zach Werenski cut in from the blue line. Early on, Mrazek was very quick at resetting himself and positioning his body to cut down the angle. In the first 25 minutes, Mrazek appeared locked in and focused.

How much will Flyers change? Another summer is here for Ron Hextall

zack-hill-flyers-ron-hextall.jpg
Zack Hill/Philadelphia Flyers

How much will Flyers change? Another summer is here for Ron Hextall

This is a peculiar time for Ron Hextall.

In one facet, it's his time, precious for a build-from-within disciple who must feel like a kid on Christmas when the NHL draft arrives.

Then again, it's a weird time. Shortly after the Flyers' general manager unwraps his gifts and adds them to the toy bin, NHL free agency hits. Not a time when Hextall likes to play. Quickly, Christmas turns into the first day of school.

It's that time of year again for Hextall. The question is, have the times changed for the GM?

With the Flyers entering Year 4 under Dave Hakstol and looking to take the next step forward, some wonder if Hextall is ready to make free agency his new time. After all, much of the organization's youth is here and contributing, the core isn't getting any younger and the Flyers have more financial wiggle room — thanks to Hextall — with $17.2 million in cap space, according to CapFriendly.com.

But if Hextall's vision was ever in danger of shifting, an expansion team's marvelous story lent credence to his plan, reinforcing the belief in the way he operates and constructs his own hockey team.

When asked Thursday about the constant chatter regarding his core's clock and the team's youthfulness catching up to it, Hextall spoke with conviction and at length.

"They might have different roles; you almost might not depend on them quite as much because your younger guys are coming up and taking a bigger piece of the pie," Hextall said. "So all of a sudden you don't need one guy scoring 85 points, he can score 75 points or 70 points because we've got these kids coming up that are scoring more and more. 

"That's how you build a team. You don't build a team by having three top players and they go out every power play and they win you games. It's just not the way it works. You saw — Vegas is a good example. They were the best team in the league. Not the best talent, they were the best team. Teams still win. Teams still win. And that's what we've got to continue to build."

So if you were hoping Hextall was tinkering with the thought of making a free-agent splash, think again. He will stick to his guns and always has, constantly stressing the importance of never deviating from the course set at the journey's start.

None of which is to think Hextall won't utilize free agency to improve. He will make additions strategically and judiciously, but doling out money and years to a stud won't happen.

And the moment Hextall reaffirmed his M.O., the pressure picked up.

On all levels.

On Hextall's faith in Claude Giroux, Jakub Voracek and the mainstays delivering star-like production.

On the young foundation pieces taking heftier strides to lighten the loads for the veterans.

On the scouting and development personnel finding and molding game-changing talent.

And on the confluence of Hextall's motives and ultimate goal.

"We are still the ultimate team sport and I think Vegas proved that to all of us this year. The more we move along here, the more society, pro sports seem to put a spotlight on a star, and that's fine, but that star has got to have his teammates in our sport or you're not going to win," Hextall said. "You look at Washington, they had a lot of really good players in the playoffs. Devante Smith-Pelly. Do they win without Devante Smith-Pelly? A couple guys get all the credit but look what this guy did. We are still the ultimate team sport, we really are."

The ultimate test will be the Flyers proving it themselves.

More on the Flyers

2018 NHL draft profile: Rasmus Sandin, a defenseman Flyers should know and like

terrywilson_rasmussandin_flyers.jpg
Terry Wilson/OHL Images

2018 NHL draft profile: Rasmus Sandin, a defenseman Flyers should know and like

In the weeks leading up to the 2018 NHL draft, we're providing prospect profiles and how those players would fit with the Flyers, who have two first-round picks — Nos. 14 and 19.

The NHL draft takes place June 22-23 at American Airlines Center in Dallas. The Flyers have nine picks with two in the first, fifth and seventh rounds and one in the second, fourth and sixth. They do not own a third-rounder as it went to the Detroit Red Wings for Petr Mrazek. The 14th pick conveyed from the Brayden Schenn trade. The final details were Schenn to the St. Louis Blues for Jori Lehtera, a 2017 first-round pick (Morgan Frost) and the 14th pick.

Our prospect profiles will touch mostly on prospects projected to go in the 10-20 range but some may require the Flyers having to trade up to select. We’ll identify those prospects.

Rasmus Sandin

Position: Defenseman
Height: 5-foot-11
Weight: 185
Shoots: Left
Team: Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds

Scouting report
The Swedish blueliner is a slick skater who looks like a pro with the puck on his stick. The 18-year-old sees the ice extremely well and can shoot and pass with precision.

As good as he is handling the puck, Sandin is also adept without it. He exploits gaps in the opposition's defense and attacks the net when the opportunity is ripe to create more offensive chances instead of simply floating around the perimeter.

His decision to come to North America and play for the OHL's Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds did wonders in his vital draft year. Sandin's plus-35 rating was best among all OHL rookies, while his 12 goals, 33 assists and 45 points over 51 regular-season games led all first-year defensemen. He also had a strong postseason with 13 points (one goal, 12 assists) in 24 contests.

Sandin isn't the biggest or quickest skater, but he makes up for it in many other ways.

Fit with Flyers
General manager Ron Hextall said the Flyers need to "restock a little bit" on defense given their previous prospects are either with the big club or flirting with making the NHL jump.

"I would be shocked if we don't draft a couple of defensemen," Hextall said Thursday.

Sandin could be an option at both Nos. 14 and 19. He projects to go in that range or possibly a tad later. Hextall's staff likely saw a good bit of Sandin while checking in on Flyers prospect Frost's 112-point season with the Greyhounds.

So Sandin has had the eyes of the Flyers and will have them watching on draft night as defensemen start going off the board.

More on the 2018 NHL draft

Profile: Ryan Merkley

• Profile: Dominik Bokk

• Profile: Noah Dobson

• Profile: Rasmus Kupari

• Profile: Martin Kaut

• Profile: Grigori Denisenko

• Profile: Jesperi Kotkaniemi

• Profile: Serron Noel

• Profile: Joel Farabee

• Profile: Barrett Hayton

• Profile: Isac Lundestrom

• Profile: Joseph Veleno

• Profile: Vitali Kravtso