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Welcome to the new CSNPhilly.com

We're very pleased to be able to welcome you to the newly redesigned CSNPhilly.com.  In the four years since our last redesign, many changes have occurred in the way online media is consumed, and as a result we felt the need to adapt to your reading and viewing habits. It is our genuine hope at CSN that these changes will lead to an improved user experience for you, our loyal fans.
 
Don’t worry though, we haven’t changed the core of what we do — just how we package it. On CSNPhilly.com you’ll still get the best sports coverage in the region from Insiders Jim Salisbury (Phillies), Reuben Frank (Eagles), Tim Panaccio (Flyers) and Jessica Camerato (Sixers), alongside insightful columns from John Gonzalez. Unique content from The700Level.com will continue to remain a focus, as will digital original videos.
 
In addition, video from our on-air award winning anchors/reporters and in-game broadcasters will be easier to find alongside game highlights and analysis. As always, you’ll still be able to live stream TCN’s morning show, Breakfast on Broad.
 
This new experience, consistent with our sister site NBCSports.com, focuses on an overall better user experience. We wanted to acknowledge that in today’s world, sports content is consumed quicker than ever thanks to mobile devices and tablets, and as a result we made other changes that you’ll notice, including:
 
• Responsive design: The site now adjusts to the device you’re using, whether it's a laptop, tablet or phone. This provides the best possible viewing and interactive experience possible.
 
• Infinite scroll: Finish reading a story, and you’ll immediately see another story underneath it. It's now much easier to access related articles.
 
• Easier access to video: We are a TV station after all, and now our Emmy-award winning video content is more effectively organized and displayed throughout the site.
 
We recognize change may take time to get used to, and we promise we’ll continuously work to improve the site based on your feedback. I’d encourage you to let us know your thoughts in the comments section below or by emailing us at askcsn@comcastsportsnet.com.
 
On behalf of Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia, thank you for being an avid viewer and reader, and we hope you’ll enjoy our new site.
 
Todd Berman
Senior Director, Digital Media
Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia

Supreme Court gives go-ahead on sports betting in New Jersey

Supreme Court gives go-ahead on sports betting in New Jersey

WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a federal law that bars gambling on football, basketball, baseball and other sports in most states, giving states the go-ahead to legalize betting on sports.

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. The 1992 law barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions. It made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game.

One research firm estimated before the ruling that if the Supreme Court were to strike down the law, 32 states would likely offer sports betting within five years.

"The legalization of sports gambling requires an important policy choice, but the choice is not ours to make. Congress can regulate sports gambling directly, but if it elects not to do so, each state is free to act on its own. Our job is to interpret the law Congress has enacted and decide whether it is consistent with the Constitution. PASPA is not," Justice Samuel Alito wrote for the court.

The court's decision came in a case from New Jersey, which has fought for years to legalize gambling on sports at casinos and racetracks in the state. Then-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said after arguments in the case in December that if justices sided with the state, bets could be taken "within two weeks" of a decision. On Monday, after the ruling was announced, Christie tweeted that it was a "great day for the rights of states and their people to make their own decisions."

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy shared Christie's excitement in a press release Monday.

"I am thrilled to see the Supreme Court finally side with New Jersey and strike down the arbitrary ban on sports betting imposed by Congress decades ago," he said.

“New Jersey has long been the lead advocate in fighting this inherently unequal law, and today’s ruling will finally allow for authorized facilities in New Jersey to take the same bets that are legal in other states in our country.

"Today’s victory would not have been possible without the incredible bipartisan effort from so many in our state, particularly former Governor Christie and former State Senator Lesniak. I look forward to working with the Legislature to enact a law authorizing and regulating sports betting in the very near future.”

It's possible that the first to market with sports betting in New Jersey will be a racetrack at the Jersey shore. Monmouth Park has already set up a sports book operation and has previously estimated it could take bets within two weeks of a favorable Supreme Court ruling.

Tony Rodio, president of Tropicana Entertainment, said his Atlantic City casino will "absolutely" offer sports betting once it can get it up and running. "It's been a long time coming," he said.

More than a dozen states had supported New Jersey, which argued that Congress exceeded its authority when it passed the law barring states from authorizing sports betting. New Jersey said the Constitution allows Congress to pass laws barring wagering on sports, but Congress can't require states to keep sports gambling prohibitions in place.

“The Supreme Court’s ruling is a win for New Jersey and the rest of the country," New Jersey Congressman Frank Pallone Jr. said in a statement. "PASPA was clearly unconstitutional, and the ban on sports betting has now rightfully been rejected by the Court. I have long believed that New Jersey should have the opportunity to proceed with sports betting. Now that the Supreme Court has struck down this unlawful and confusing law, it is time for Congress to move the GAME Act forward to ensure that consumer protections are in place in any state that decides to implement sports betting.”

Last year, Pallone introduced the GAME Act, allowing states to legalize sports betting and online gambling if protections are also in place. The GAME Act could now act as the legal blueprint for states to adopt sports betting.

All four major U.S. professional sports leagues, the NCAA and the federal government had urged the court to uphold the federal law. In court, the NBA, NFL, NHL and Major League Baseball had argued that New Jersey's gambling expansion would hurt the integrity of their games. Outside court, however, leaders of all but the NFL have shown varying degrees of openness to legalized sports gambling.

The American Gaming Association estimates that Americans illegally wager about $150 billion on sports each year.

New Jersey has spent years and millions of dollars in legal fees trying to legalize sports betting at its casinos, racetracks and former racetracks. In 2012, with voters' support, New Jersey lawmakers passed a law allowing sports betting, directly challenging the 1992 federal law which says states can't "authorize by law" sports gambling. The four major professional sports leagues and the NCAA sued, and the state lost in court.

In 2014, New Jersey tried a different tactic by repealing laws prohibiting sports gambling at casinos and racetracks. It argued taking its laws off the books was different from authorizing sports gambling. The state lost again and then took the case to the Supreme Court.