Eagles

Eagles

PHOENIX -- If you were hoping to see the Eagles on HBO's Hard Knocks this summer, you're out of luck.

Eagles owner Jeff Lurie on Tuesday evening at the NFL's annual owners meetings said he didn't think his team will be featured on the popular show that chronicles training camp. 

The Eagles were one of just eight teams that could have been forced to participate in the show because they don't fall into any of these three categories that allow teams to pass: teams with a new head coach, teams that have made the playoffs in either of the last two seasons, and teams that have appeared on the show in the last 10 years. 

The seven other possibilities are the Bears, Ravens, Saints, Colts, Titans, Bucs and Browns. 

Would Eagles draft Mixon? 
A hot topic at the owner's meetings this year in Arizona is Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon and what team will be willing to draft him. 

While Mixon is a top-notch talent who would seem to really fit in the Eagles' offense, he comes with a huge red flag in the form of a video that shows him punching a woman and breaking her jaw. 

Here's what Lurie said when asked about Mixon on Tuesday: 

"Yeah, I don't want to talk about a specific player. Of course, I know all about situations like that. I'll say this: First of all, we've been an organization that's given players a second chance. However, we've also been an organization that really values character. So add to that the fact that I would never want to telegraph what we're going to do at any position in the draft, so sitting here with all you guys, just to be completely honest, I can't explain to you exactly what we would be doing because I don't want to telegraph to the rest of the league what we're going to do. That’s sort of the foundation of that."

 

The Eagles' best example of giving a second chance was when they brought Michael Vick to town in 2009. 

While some teams have complete non-starters -- domestic abuse being one of them -- the Eagles judge every incident on a case-by-case basis. 

"You've got to do your due diligence in this world and it's not fair to the organization or the player to not have all the information," Lurie said. "And that's where we dig and we dig a lot to try to make the soundest decision."

Raiders to Vegas
The biggest story of the 2017 owners meetings is the approved move for the Raiders to Las Vegas. 

Lurie, a member of the league's finance committee, said he hated to see this move happen. 

"You're talking about people, their emotions, their fan base," he said. "It just makes you feel terrible. On the other hand, the Oakland Raiders tried everything possible to make something happen over the last decade. It was just an impossible situation they got into. We hope Las Vegas will be a rebirth of that franchise and I honestly hope someday we'll have another team in Oakland and San Diego because those fans deserve it.

"They're great fans and I feel bad. I feel like it's a failure. On the other hand, it's a rebirth of a franchise that has really struggled. They're going to be a good young team, they've got a really good, young quarterback and the future is bright for them. But you wish it was able to stay in the Bay Area."