Phillies

Best of MLB: Jake Odorizzi, Lucas Duda help Rays stay in thick of wild-card hunt

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Best of MLB: Jake Odorizzi, Lucas Duda help Rays stay in thick of wild-card hunt

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. -- Jake Odorizzi took a no-hitter into the seventh inning in front of a tiny home crowd, and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Minnesota Twins 2-1 on Tuesday night.

Lucas Duda homered and drove in both runs for the Rays, who improved to .500 on the season and got within two games of Minnesota for the second AL wild card.

Joe Mauer got the Twins' first hit -- and extended his hitting streak to 14 games -- with a grounder that caromed off second base with one out in the seventh. Odorizzi (8-7) was lifted for reliever Dan Jennings after striking out the next batter, Jorge Polanco.

The only other batter to reach base against Odorizzi was Eddie Rosario, who walked leading off the fifth.

The game was played before a crowd of 6,509, the smallest-ever announced attendance for a Rays home game. Nearly 400 fewer fans attended last Wednesday's relocated game between the Astros and Rangers at Tropicana Field (see full recap).

Pirates rally past Cubs for 4th straight win
PITTSBURGH -- Max Moroff and David Freese delivered RBI singles off Carl Edwards Jr. in the eighth inning as the Pittsburgh Pirates rallied past the Chicago Cubs 4-3 on Tuesday night.

John Jaso led off the eighth with a pinch-hit walk then later scored when Moroff hit a bloop single to left off Edwards (3-4) to tie the game. Freese drove home Moroff three batters later after the Cubs intentionally walked Pirates rookie Josh Bell.

Jordan Luplow hit the second home run of his career for Pittsburgh. Wade LeBlanc (5-2) earned the win in relief. Felipe Rivero worked a perfect ninth for his 18th save. The Pirates ran their winning streak to four on the same day the club announced contract extensions for manager Clint Hurdle and general manager Neal Huntington.

Ian Happ had a two-run single for Chicago. Alberto Almora Jr. and Kris Bryant had two hits apiece but the Cubs left eight men on base to drop their third consecutive game (see full recap).

Jones, Hicks blast 2 homers each in Tigers’ victory
DETROIT -- JaCoby Jones and John Hicks hit two home runs and the Detroit Tigers had six homers in all in a 13-2 victory over the Kansas City Royals on Tuesday night.

Tigers starting pitcher Anibal Sanchez threw only five pitches and was knocked out of the game in the first inning after getting hit by Whit Merrifield's single in the right leg. Sanchez, who was charged with one earned run when Merrifield later scored, left the game with a calf injury.

Reliever Myles Jaye (1-0) replaced Sanchez and pitched 2 1/3 innings. He allowed one hit, two walks and a wild pitch, leaving in the third inning with the Tigers holding a 7-1 lead.

Jason Vargas (14-10) took the loss, allowing seven earned runs and six hits, a walk and a hit batter in two innings of work (see full recap).

Phillies prospects discuss their struggles to grow...facial hair

Phillies prospects discuss their struggles to grow...facial hair

Watch professional sports long enough and you start to feel old.

Take a look at the birthdates of some of the players in Phillies camp this spring for example and you'll wonder how it's even possible.

As the legendary Wooderson from Dazed and Confused famously said, "I get older, they stay the same age."

The youngsters in Phillies camp may be fantastic baseball talents but one area where they come up rather short is in their facial hair game. Lots of development and growth needed there.

Our own John Clark is down in Clearwater and caught up with the likes of Spencer Howard, Alec Bohm, Damon Jones, Kyle Dohy and J.D. Hammer to discuss the best and worst mustaches in camp. You can watch that video above.

"Dohy's is probably top right now," Hammer said, but he was also accused of cheating by dyeing said 'stache darker.

Spencer Howard has the most work to do, according to his teammates.

"Spencer tries hard, he gives his effort, but he's not there yet," Bohm said.

Howard disagrees.

"I would probably pick myself," Howard said of the best 'stache in camp. "I don't know if you can see it, probably not, I haven't shaved it in about two and a half months, but I'm working on it."

You love to see that kind of confidence from young prospects.

Hopefully we'll see them all develop and make it to Citizens Bank Park this summer -- mustaches or not.

Joe Girardi defends himself against sign-stealing video – 'We caught them,' he says

Joe Girardi defends himself against sign-stealing video – 'We caught them,' he says

CLEARWATER, Fla. — The story that won’t go away wended its way through Phillies camp Thursday in the form of a 22-second video of Joe Girardi talking about illicit sign-stealing.

The video was plucked from a segment on sign-stealing that Girardi participated in during his time with the MLB Network. It was taped in mid-October, just before he was named Phillies manager.

In the video, analyst and former big-league pitcher Al Leiter asks Girardi, “What did you guys use?”

The question is accompanied by some laughs but it’s clear that Leiter is asking what means the New York Yankees used to pick up signs during Girardi’s time as manager of that club from 2008 to 2017.

Girardi responds by saying, “I was part of a system …” He then explains how signs were detected “upstairs” and relayed down to the dugout and field.

At first blush, it sounds rather incriminating. 

Until you hear how Girardi punctuates his comment.

“We eventually caught it,” he says in the video.

Girardi knew the video had been making the rounds — he said it made him laugh — and was prepared to answer questions about it after Thursday's workout.

“If people listen to the whole video, you can put 2 and 2 together and know what I’m talking about,” he said. “We caught them.”

Caught who?

There was a long pause.

“Put 2 and 2 together,” he said.

The implication was that Girardi was talking about the Houston Astros, who were nailed for illegal sign-stealing during the 2017 season. The Astros eliminated Girardi’s Yankees in the ALCS that season and went on to win the World Series.

But he may have been talking about the Boston Red Sox, an AL East rival of the Yankees, who are also under investigation for stealing signs illegally.

Who knows?

As fallout from the cheating scandal has engulfed baseball in the early weeks of spring training, Girardi has been mostly reserved while speaking with Philadelphia reporters about the topic. The emergence of the MLB Network video resulted in him being more expansive Thursday.

Girardi was asked about his saying, “I was part of a system” in the video.

“Yeah, the system was our system caught the other group,” he said. “If you listen to the whole video, we caught the other team. It was coming from upstairs to someone in the dugout and then relayed one way or another. I laugh because people are cutting it up and trying to make it something.

“It wasn’t our team doing it. We caught the other team doing it. And I think part of this is why the Commissioner has put out some of these rules and I think it’s important that we protect the integrity of the game because that is really important to me.”

Girardi was asked if his team reported the violating team to MLB.

“As a manager, I personally don’t, but that doesn’t mean that the team I was on didn’t,” he said.

The video dealt extensively with the importance of teams protecting their signs from being stolen and that has been a theme of Girardi’s first camp with the Phillies.

“A lot of people want to talk about what happened in 2017, ‘18, ’19,” he said. “No. It’s what we do moving forward, guys, that’s important to me.

“It’s complicated in a lot of manners and guarding your signs is really difficult today with all the cameras and everything you can see. So you have to be really clever. It’s hard.”

MLB is expected to come up with tighter guidelines regarding access to video around the dugout before opening day. One possible solution would be locking down the video room at game time. But that comes with complications because teams need access to instant replay to challenge umpire calls.

“I don’t know if I’ve thought through it enough because I know players like watching their at-bats,” Girardi said. “I think the replay room has caused a lot of consequences that they did not foresee. And I’m a proponent of replay. I think it’s important. But there’s some consequences that I don’t know any of us foresaw as we put this is in because it’s usually right next to the video room."

One potential solution is barring players from watching video during the games — it seemed to work OK for Ted Williams and Mike Schmidt — and moving those who keep tabs on potential replay challenges upstairs to the press/broadcast level.

Girardi said he wouldn’t mind if those who oversee replay challenges moved upstairs but he’s not sure about closing off the video room to players.

“I don’t know what the right answer is because players like watching their at-bats,” he said.

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