Phillies

Drew Anderson has emerged as one of the Phillies' top pitching prospects

Drew Anderson has emerged as one of the Phillies' top pitching prospects

CLEARWATER, Fla. — Drew Anderson remembers his telephone ringing in November. He remembers hearing Phillies director of player development Joe Jordan congratulate him and tell him that he'd been placed on the team's 40-man roster.

Anderson was elated.

"It was awesome," the right-handed pitcher said the other day.

So awesome that Anderson celebrated in an unusual way.

"I busted out 50 pushups," he said. "I had so much adrenaline."

The internal discussions that teams have when considering which players to protect on the 40-man roster and which ones to risk losing in the Rule 5 draft are often long and detailed and decisions are not always reached easily.

But in Anderson's case ...

"It was not a long conversation," Jordan said. "The feeling was, 'Put him on the roster. Don't lose him. Let's talk about the next guy.'"

"Across the board," minor-league pitching coordinator Rafael Chaves said. "And that's not common for a kid that pitched in A-ball."

Anderson, who turns 23 on March 22, will get his first taste of Double A ball in April.

Clearly, the Phillies are high on him.

But how high?

"We've got scouts who will tell you that he might be our best pitching prospect," Jordan said.

Given some of the power arms that the Phils have collected in the low minors, that's quite a statement.

If it seems as if Anderson has flown below the radar since being drafted by the Phillies in 2012 it's because, well, he's done just that.

For a while.

He received little interest from four-year colleges coming out of Galena High School in Reno, Nevada, and was headed to Mesa Community College in Arizona before the Phillies selected him in the 21st round that year.

"My name never really got out there," he said. "Really only the Phillies looked at me. (Area scout) Joey Davis saw me and he said he liked that I had a fluid arm and he liked the way the ball jumped out of my hand. He saw me as a sleeper pick. I just wanted to play ball so I said, 'Yeah, I'll give it a shot.'"

Jordan recalled seeing Anderson pitch at Single A Lakewood early in the 2014 season. Anderson had added strength to his 6-foot-3 frame and his fastball velocity had jumped from 90-92 mph to 93-95 mph.

"It was just a matter of physical maturity, his body getting stronger, and we were really excited," Jordan said.

Anderson did not make it through that season, however. He came down with an elbow injury and the following spring became a statistic — a pitcher who needed Tommy John surgery.

Anderson missed the 2015 season. He came back in May of last year and made 15 starts between Lakewood and Clearwater. At Clearwater, the Phillies' advanced Single A stop, Anderson posted a 1.93 ERA in 32 2/3 innings. He struck out 37 and walked 10.

The rehabilitation process after Tommy John surgery focuses on more than just the elbow. Special attention is paid to the shoulder and the legs. Working under Joe Rauch, the Phillies' minor-league rehab specialist, Anderson gained much strength in those areas and it showed in his fastball velocity last summer.

He got it up to 97 mph.

He also has a good breaking ball and an improving changeup to go with a classic pitcher's body. He has long arms and weighs 205 pounds.

"We just felt some team out there would have taken him even if they had to stash him in the bullpen," said Jordan, expounding on the Phils' decision to add Anderson to the 40-man roster in November. "He's too big an asset."

Anderson is excited about making the jump to Reading this season. He's never pitched more than 76 innings as a pro and now that he's healthy needs to start racking up mound time and experience.

Anderson mentioned how hard he worked this offseason to get ready for his first trip to big-league camp and what lies beyond when he heads to Double A.

The hard work started with those 50 pushups that he busted out upon learning that he'd been placed on the 40-man roster.

"After hearing that, it was time to kick it in gear," he said. "I was like, 'Let's do this.'

"I've had some ups and downs, but I feel like I'm on track now."

2 buddies and the Bamboo Man keep Phillies loose and in the win column

2 buddies and the Bamboo Man keep Phillies loose and in the win column

A toweled Hector Neris entered the Phillies' clubhouse, saw a group of reporters congregating around Maikel Franco, looked over and gave his buddy a quick message.

"Franco,” the perpetually grinning Neris said, “make sure to say something funny.”

Neris and Franco, two friends who have been through a hell of a lot together as Phillies. They've seen years with no expectations and high expectations. They've played important roles and lost their roles. They've been key cogs and been demoted. 

On Tuesday night, both were instrumental in another Phillies comeback win over the Mets. Franco hit the game-winning two-run homer in the sixth inning of the 7-5 victory, a night after also delivering the decisive two-run homer in the middle innings.

Neris picked up four huge outs for his 16th save in 17 chances. With the tying run on base and one out in the ninth, Neris struck out young lefty Dom Smith and got veteran righty Wilson Ramos to ground out to second base.

Smith and Michael Conforto in particular, were fooled by Neris' trademark splitter. They both expanded the strike zone and looked bad doing it. Neris feasts on over-aggressive hitters who can't lay off the split.

"It's a very unique pitch," manager Gabe Kapler said, "one that it doesn't matter how many times you see it, it still doesn't give you an advantage."

Kapler was ejected in the sixth inning when he argued a warning from umpire Joe West after Scott Kingery was hit by a pitch near the head. The manager was still in a good mood after the win and didn't necessarily think the Rhys Hoskins-Jacob Rhame episode two months ago played a role.

After the Phillies' win Monday, Jean Segura had called Franco one of the Phillies' key bats. Segura talked about how much he enjoys relying on Franco on the left side of the infield. He mentioned how Franco can change a game with one swing and how when he, in particular, is going right, the Phillies' offense is just a lot better. 

It's true. Franco offers offensive upside that veteran utilityman Sean Rodriguez does not. Franco can pop one at any moment. He can pound a mistake. He can also pound a hittable pitch into the ground to the left side, as he had done far too frequently the last six weeks, but when Franco is on and feeling confident, he's dangerous.

"It makes me feel great," Franco said of Segura's comments last night. "I've been around good teammates. They've been great and supporting me. That makes me push myself every single day and perform and do everything I can to get better and make adjustments."

After one of the Phillies’ four home runs, Franco and Segura were on the field to do their handshakes with Rhys Hoskins. As Segura turned back toward the dugout, Franco took a couple hops toward him and gave him a hard noogie. 

This team is not playing tight. 

The Phillies picked up their starting pitcher for the second straight night. Jake Arrieta and Zach Eflin have combined to allow 11 runs in 11 innings against the Mets but both have received wins because the Phils' bats came alive during the half-innings they were pinch-hit for.

The Mets held early leads in both games. The Phillies could have gone into a shell after the seven straight losses that preceded this series. Instead, the lineup finally looked the lineup it was supposed to be.

"It was exactly what we needed the last couple nights," Arrieta said. "It wasn't ideal from a pitching perspective the last couple nights from me and Zach, but sometimes that's what you need. The guys picked both of us up. Would have loved to have thrown the ball better. There were some really good things that happened, and some not so good. But we were able to kind of put it behind us in a positive way with a win and a chance to get a couple more before we go on the road. So the guys are feeling good about it."

The guys are also feeling good about these bamboo plants. First, one was in Brad Miller's locker Monday. Then a giant bamboo plant was on the table in the middle of the clubhouse Tuesday. Arrieta said Tuesday night he might put one in his locker tomorrow. Kapler said there might be one in every locker. 

Miller is doing more than keeping the mood light. He gave the Phils insurance with a pinch-hit solo shot Tuesday and is 3 for 4 with two extra-base hits as a pinch-hitter.

"They're going to think I'm crazy going back to that place tomorrow for the third day in a row but I told them I would see them tomorrow," Miller said. "They're going to keep hiking the prices up on me. It was worth it.

"Everyone has been awesome from Day One. I showed up and we went through a tough stretch, but nobody seemed to panic or anything. The first night, I saw a bunch of guys out at dinner and tried to join in and work hard and earn their respect and get to the party and enjoy it. It's been fun."

 

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Phillies 7, Mets 5: Maikel Franco does it again on a short night for Gabe Kapler

Phillies 7, Mets 5: Maikel Franco does it again on a short night for Gabe Kapler

 

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies