Phillies

Ty Kelly turns into Phillies' unlikely hero against Red Sox ace Chris Sale

Ty Kelly turns into Phillies' unlikely hero against Red Sox ace Chris Sale

Less than two months ago, Ty Kelly wasn't on the Phillies' roster. 

He'd spent his nine seasons in pro baseball with five different organizations. And after the Mets designated him for assignment in early April, Kelly bounced from Queens to Toronto's Triple A team in Buffalo before finally landing in Philadelphia.

So when the same Kelly — who entered Thursday night with just 87 career major-league at-bats under his belt — stepped to the dish in the bottom of the eighth against a lights-out Chris Sale, he was facing one of the hottest arms in baseball, one with a 0.93 WHIP and a 95-plus mph heater.

But it was the career minor leaguer and not the five-time All-Star who delivered, with Kelly slapping a hanging slider from Sale down the left-field line. Phils third base coach Juan Samuel waved Andrew Knapp home for what would wind up being the game-winning run in a 1-0 victory (see game story).

The double was only the seventh hit for Kelly this season. For a guy who has seen little action this year, the moment did not faze him.

"The expectations are kind of tempered a little bit because [Sale's] pitching so well," Kelly said. "You're just going up there trying to do something positive, try to hit a ball hard, and hope it falls ... I'm pretty relaxed going into those kind of at-bats and I don't feel a ton of pressure. If anything, it's less pressure against someone like that."

Sale cruised through the first 7 1/3 frames. The southpaw struck out 10 and had surrendered only two hits before Knapp came up a third time in the eighth and earlier results hadn't been pretty for the first-year catcher against Boston's ace. Yet after striking out and grounding back to the pitcher, Knapp roped one into left to set up Kelly for what would be the crucial point of the night.

Like Thursday's hero, Knapp also has seen limited chances this year. Backing up Cameron Rupp, the Phillies' 2013 second-round selection made just the 27th appearance of his rookie campaign Thursday and entered with only 19 hits in 81 at-bats.

Yet, as Knapp made his way around third, he had nothing on his mind but sending his team on its way to a win, one that ultimately snapped an eight-game skid.

"I knew anything could happen down [in the corner]," Knapp said. "But the mentality you have to have going around the bases is, 'Yes, yes, yes,' and then they stop you. I was going until he stopped me and [Samuel] just kept waving me."

For a struggling lineup, it was another quiet night.

The first seven guys in the Phillies' order mustered only two hits and a walk to go along with eight strikeouts vs. Sale. No one seemed to be able to figure out his side-arm stuff that had already earned him eight wins and a sub-three ERA this season. 

So when Pete Mackanin's team needed a lift and Sale made what he called "the worst pitch of the game at the wrong time," a pair of unexpected offensive outlets got the job done.

"It's always huge when you get a pinch hit and it happens to win the game for you," Mackanin said. "It was a good call by Juan Samuel — late in the game, I like to see him be aggressive like that. ... All in all, there's a lot to be said for [Knapp and Kelly]."

The last time Kelly came to bat in as critical a situation as Thursday's against this caliber of a pitcher was last year's wild-card game when he pinch-hit for the Mets against Madison Bumgarner. Although he did turn that eighth-inning chance into a base knock as well, he was stranded on second.

This time, although Kelly found himself on second at the end of the eighth once again, he'd done his duty — and against one of baseball's best arms, adding to the best moments of his still-short major-league career.

"Those are the at-bats that, as a player, you want," Kelly said. "It's way harder to hit down 10 [runs] or up 10 against somebody because there's nothing riding on the at-bat. So when you've got a chance to just put a ball in play and it could move the guy over, there are tons of positives that can come out of an at-bat like that."

So what's different about this one?

"I don't know. Maybe more of my friends will text me tonight," Kelly laughed.

At The Yard Podcast: Latest on Harper, Machado and one eye on Mike Trout

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At The Yard Podcast: Latest on Harper, Machado and one eye on Mike Trout

On this edition of At The Yard, Corey Seidman and Jim Salisbury discuss the latest with Bryce Harper and Manny Machado's free agency. Which rumors are true? Which rumors are just noise?

What is the potential of the starting rotation? What could the outfield look like with or without Harper?

Also, we're keeping one eye on Mike Trout. When should the Phillies begin their pursuit of the best player in baseball?

1:00 - The latest on Bryce Harper and Manny Machado.
4:00 - Jim thinks the Dodgers, Cubs, Yankees and Cardinals are in on Harper and/or Machado.
10:00 - Are the White Sox serious contenders for Machado?
15:00 - The guys answer questions from the audience.
19:00 - Difference Machado would make defensively.
25:30 - Opening day outfield without Harper.
31:30 - Is baseball's offseason too slow?
35:00 - Keeping an eye on Mike Trout.

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Roy Halladay looking like a Hall of Fame lock this year, based on votes gathered

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Roy Halladay looking like a Hall of Fame lock this year, based on votes gathered

On Jan. 22, we will find out whether Roy Halladay will be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

And based on the votes compiled so far, Doc looks like a lock.

Ryan Thibodaux (@NotMrTibbs on Twitter) has been tracking and obtaining ballots from Hall of Fame voters for years. 

And his findings so far reveal that Halladay is trailing only Mariano Rivera on this year's ballot

Halladay has received 94.0 percent of the 179 votes obtained. It means that he needs only 59.6 percent of remaining votes to reach the 75 percent threshold needed for induction.

It is obviously extremely sad that Halladay will not get to experience it. There was no pitcher of his era who commanded more respect and that legacy will last for decades and decades and decades. It's hard to find anyone — a baseball player, manager, front office-type or writer — whom Halladay failed to make a positive, lasting impression on. It will be another bittersweet moment for fans of the Phillies, Blue Jays and baseball in general when Halladay is posthumously inducted. 

The induction ceremony will take place in Cooperstown on Sunday, July 21 at 1:30 p.m.

Curt Schilling may also get the call to the Hall this year. It's his seventh time on the ballot, and so far, he's received 73.9 percent of public/anonymous votes, which is just short. He'd need 75.9 percent of remaining voters to back him to reach the induction requirement.

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