Philadelphia Eagles

Eagles Injury Update: Carson Wentz back in 11-on-11s next week

Eagles Injury Update: Carson Wentz back in 11-on-11s next week

Carson Wentz hasn’t participated in 11-on-11 drills since Saturday, July 28, the third day of training camp. 

That’s likely going to change next week. 

The coaching staff had backed off from Wentz in full-team drills because they were happy with what they saw from him during those early 11-on-11s and wanted to minimize any extra risk that having him out there in those situations would create as he recovers from ACL and LCL surgery. 

According to the plan — as secretive as the Eagles have kept it — Wentz expects to be back in 11-on-11s next week, an obvious good sign as he continues to keep his goal of being ready to play in Week 1. 

Doug Pederson said that he would ideally get to see Wentz in 11-on-11s for a week before he plays in a game. This new revelation would give Wentz three weeks in full-team drills before the opener on Sept. 6. 

Still, as Wentz said on WIP Tuesday morning, it’s “going to be close” as to whether or not he starts Week 1. 

“That’s what I felt really offseason,” Wentz said after today’s practice. “We’ve talked about it a ton. That’s been my goal. It’s no secret that it’s going to be close. We’ve seen where I’m at in camp and hopefully next week doing 11-on-11. I think, naturally, it’s going to be close. Ultimately, it won’t be my call, the coach’s call, ultimately, it’ll be up to the doctors.” 

Wentz said he’s no more or less optimistic than he was at the start of training camp about his chances to play Week 1. That’s probably a good sign, that things are progressing according to plan. 

Even though Wentz will be back in full-team drills next week, he still won’t be cleared for contact. That will be the last hurdle to get over. Wentz said his knee has responded well all training camp. 

What does he want to show Pederson during 11-on-11s next week?

“I think hopefully just show him that I look comfortable and I look confident,” he said. “And I know I will. The reps I have gotten, I feel confident in both my knee and this team and the offense and everything. Hopefully, I can just jump back into where I left off.”

In other injury news, Pederson said he wasn’t going to comment on a report that Alshon Jeffery could possibly start the season on PUP. Then he commented that the team is monitoring Jeffery and is happy with where he’s at.

“Not sure where that came from,” Pederson said of the report. 

Nelson Agholor, Corey Clement, Donnel Pumphrey, Josh Adams, Markus Wheaton, Mack Hollins, Asantay Brown and Chandon Sullivan all missed practice. 

Pederson said Agholor and Clement are dealing with “lower body” injuries and they are resting them as they get ready for Week 1.

I asked Agholor if there’s a chance he’d miss one. After laughing, here’s what he said: 

“I’m gonna let coach answer that, but you know me. I do what I need to do.” 

All those guys listed above aren’t expected to play in Thursday night’s preseason game, but Nick Foles should make his 2018 preseason debut. Foles has been back at practice this week after some neck spasms kept him out for the preseason opener.

More on the Eagles

Eagles fans troll Patriots fans again with billboard outside Gillette Stadium

twitter_eagles_pats_billboard.jpg
@GinaMarie0125 on Twitter

Eagles fans troll Patriots fans again with billboard outside Gillette Stadium

The Eagles swear they've moved on from Super Bowl LII, but fans? Yeah, that's never going to happen.

With the Super Bowl rematch just two days away and the Birds heading up to Foxboro, Massachusetts, Eagles fans are making sure the Patriots and their fans remember who won the Super Bowl just a few months ago.

Gina Lewis, a Massachusetts-based Birds fan, erected a billboard at the intersection of Route 1 and North Street, which is about one mile outside of Gillette Stadium.

So folks driving to Gillette Stadium from Boston, and even up from Philly, will see the billboard as they head to the Eagles-Patriots preseason game Thursday.

In terms of billboards, it's not exactly the prettiest. The idea was fantastic, but the execution could have been better. The notion that Patriots fans will have to be reminded that the Eagles beat New England, 41-33, in Super Bowl LII is brilliant.

That's not a knock on the person who designed the billboard, though. Jordan Spector is a Philadelphia-based artist who designed the billboard.

The original text on the billboard was supposed to be: "No one likes us and we don’t care." But the billboard company forced them to change it.

To be fair to Spector, the actual design of the billboard is crisper than the one that went up. You can support Spector's work (you should because art is fun) here.

Some background as to how the billboard came to be a thing. Back in June, Lewis tweeted this:

It doesn't appear the coworker came through on his promise, but that doesn't really matter. Lewis started a GoFundMe, which remains active, to raise the $5,000 to pay for the billboard.

After it reached its goal, the GoFundMe remains active and the next $5,000 will be donated to Carson Wentz's AO1 Foundation. At the time of this posting, it's raised $6,530 out of its $10,000 goal.

If you're obliged to donate, you can here.

More on the Eagles

Where Doug Pederson's aggressiveness as a play caller comes from

ap_doug_pederson.jpg
AP Images

Where Doug Pederson's aggressiveness as a play caller comes from

We’ve always known Doug Pederson is a naturally aggressive play caller.

Pederson is a laid-back guy off the field but as aggressive as any coach in NFL history on the field.

But where does that come from? How did such a chill dude become such a fearless play caller?

Pederson spoke Tuesday morning about how the way he was raised as a kid in Bellingham, Washington, defined his personality as a coach.

“Growing up with my parents, my dad has some military background, he was in the Air Force, and the way he led our household and raised us as kids … I don’t want to say it was strict but it was a rigid household growing up, so I think I got a little bit of that from my dad,” he said during an appearance with Angelo Cataldi and the 94 WIP Morning Show.

“His aggressive nature in the way he coached us and the way we raised us to stand on our own two feet.

“And listen, I was never really touted as a top athlete, quarterback, whatever, whether I was going into college or coming out of college, so for me there was a little bit of built-up underdog mentality. So for me, that’s where a little bit of this stems from.

“I made up my mind two years ago that really going into this opportunity being a head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles or wherever it might be that you only get one chance and one opportunity to do this so I want to make sure I do it right.”

The Eagles led the NFL with 17 fourth-down conversions last season, and in his two years coaching the Eagles they’ve attempted eight more fourth downs than any other team (53 to the Packers’ 45).

And that doesn’t even include the postseason, where the Eagles were 3-for-3 last year on fourth down, including two of the most celebrated conversions in Super Bowl history.

Including the regular season and postseason, the Eagles’ 20 total fourth-down conversions last year are second-most since the NFL began tracking fourth downs in 1991 (the Jaguars had 22 in 2007).

“It’s calculated,” Pederson said. “It’s not on a whim. It’s not just gut feel. For me, it was trusting my players, trusting my coaches. Out here on this grass, out here on this practice field, putting our players in those situations so when I make the decision during a game there’s no hesitation.

“So when you see Nick Foles come to the sideline and suggest 'Philly Philly,' there’s no hesitation. That’s the play. That’s the one we need. That’s the spark that’s going to help us win this football game, and that’s the collaboration process that we talk about a lot.”

And when a fourth-down attempt fails?

You don’t second-guess yourself. You just put it in the hands of the defense and move on.

“You can’t,” he said. “You don’t. You can’t second guess. You can’t go, ‘Oh man, did I make the right decision?' If you do that, yeah, you’re probably going to be a 50-50 type of team.

“Listen, these decisions are not just fly by the seat of my pants. These are calculated. I listen to some of the analytics, some of the numbers we talk about during the week, the different situation and scenarios that pop up in games.

“These are things that we study and these are things that I study during the week so I can prepare not only myself for the call but I can prepare the team for that situation.”

More on the Eagles