Phillies

Joe Girardi fired by Yankees after 10 seasons as manager

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Joe Girardi fired by Yankees after 10 seasons as manager

Joe Girardi was fired as New York Yankees manager Thursday after a decade that produced just one World Series title for a team that expects to win every year.

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman made the announcement five days after New York lost to Houston in Game 7 of the AL Championship Series.

"With a heavy heart, I come to you because the Yankees have decided not to bring me back," Girardi said in a statement released by his agent, Steven Mandell. "I'd like to thank the fans for their great support as a player, coach and manager and the lasting memories of their passion and excitement during the playoff games."

An intense and driven former All-Star catcher, Girardi was at the end of his four-year contract and said last weekend he had to speak with his family before deciding whether he wanted to return. New York made the decision for him.

"Everything this organization does is done with careful and thorough consideration, and we've decided to pursue alternatives for the managerial position," Cashman said in a statement.

Girardi's 910-710 regular-season record with the Yankees is sixth in victories managing the team behind Joe McCarthy (1,460), Joe Torre (1,173), Casey Stengel (1,149), Miller Huggins (1,067) and Ralph Houk (944).

Cashman said he and owner Hal Steinbrenner had spoken directly with Girardi this week.

"He has a tireless work ethic, and put his heart into every game he managed over the last decade," Cashman said. "He should take great pride in our accomplishments during his tenure."

Girardi wore uniform No. 25 as a player with the Yankees from 1996-99, when he helped win three titles, but switched to No. 27 when he earned the manager's job over Don Mattingly and succeeded Torre after the 2007 season -- signifying the team's quest for its 27th championship. Girardi took uniform No. 28 after leading the team to a World Series victory over Philadelphia in 2009.

New York changed managers 20 times from 1973, when George Steinbrenner bought the team, through October 1995, when Torre replaced Buck Showalter. But the Yankees have had just two managers in 22 years since.

New York became the third of the 10 postseason teams to remove managers, joining Boston and Washington. There is no clear favorite to replace him; candidates from within the organization could include bench coach Rob Thomson, Triple-A Scranton manager Al Pedrique and Class A Tampa manager Jay Bell. Possibilities from outside the organization include former Kansas City manager Trey Hillman, a one-time Yankees special assistant who managed in South Korea this year; Mets hitting coach Kevin Long, who held the same role with the Yankees from 2007-14; and former Philadelphia manager Pete Mackanin, who was a pro scout for the Yankees in 2008 and 2013.

The 53-year-old Girardi led a young squad on a surprising run to an AL wild-card berth this year with a 91-71 record, the team's best since 2012. New York beat Minnesota in the wild-card game, then fell behind Cleveland 2-0 in the Division Series. Girardi admitted he made a mistake not asking for a video review of a hit-by-pitch call in Game 2 that led to an Indians rally.

"I screwed up. And it's hard. It's a hard day for me," he said then. "But I got to move forward and we'll be ready to go tomorrow."

New York won the next three games to advance, lost the first two games of the ALCS at Houston, then won three in a row to move within a victory of reaching the World Series for the first time in eight years. But the Astros swept the final two games.

Girardi's statement thanked people from Steinbrenner and Cashman down to the player development and scouting staff, traveling secretary and even the clubhouse attendants. He had sounded unusually nostalgic when discussing the atmosphere at Yankee Stadium during the playoffs.

"It's been wonderful to watch," he said last week before what turned out to be his final home game. "I peaked at left field and I see the fans jumping up and down. And I peak and watch them hitting the pads. In right field, they're jumping up and down. And it's brought back a lot of good memories for me, but I just love it. And it's fun to be a part of."

The making of "World Champions: The Story of the '08 Phillies"

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AP Images

The making of "World Champions: The Story of the '08 Phillies"

On this special edition of At The Yard, Jim Salisbury chats with Sean Kane and Brian Brennan, the makers of "World Champions: The Story of the '08 Phillies." They discuss how the documentary was put together, deciding which parts to keep and take out and their overall memories from that magical season.

1:30 - How did this documentary get started?
4:00 - Difficult decisions made producing the documentary.
7:30 - Favorite interviews conducted.
14:00 - Chase Utley's parade speech.
20:00 - Importance of the 2007 season leading up to 2008.
26:00 - Final out of the World Series.
30:30 - Favorite stories.

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Orioles trade Manny Machado to Dodgers; here's what it means for Phillies

Orioles trade Manny Machado to Dodgers; here's what it means for Phillies

Updated: 10 p.m.

No Manny Machado for the Phillies ... this time.

The Dodgers beat the Phillies' offer — at least in the eyes of the Orioles, which is all that matters. L.A. on Wednesday traded top prospect Yusniel Diaz, Dean Kremer, Zach Pop, Rylan Bannon and Breyvic Valera to Baltimore for Machado, a free agent at season's end.

Diaz is a 21-year-old right-handed outfielder with power and plate selection the Dodgers signed out of Cuba for $15.5 million in 2015. 

The Phillies went after the former Orioles superstar aggressively and were willing to part with well-regarded prospects including right-hander Adonis Medina, but in the end, the win-now Dodgers were more willing to overpay for the best available player.

This does not, however, close the book on Machado eventually signing a long-term contract with the Phillies. Corey Seager is the Dodgers' franchise shortstop. He's out for the season with an elbow injury, which is why L.A. made this move. It makes sense for the Dodgers to overpay, it makes sense for them to go all-in given their sky-high payroll, with where they are in their window of contention and with how last October went.

We know that Machado wants to play shortstop. It's a big deal to him and it's where he feels most comfortable. He said this week in D.C. that money isn't the only factor for him this winter, that happiness is most important. If he gets similar offers and one of the teams is willing to let him play shortstop, that could make all the difference.

The Phillies will still pursue Machado this winter. Right now, however, their focus will shift to other available players on the trade market. There are still some nice players out there who could boost the left side of the Phillies' infield, their rotation or bullpen.

Check out the Phils' other options here. The Blue Jays, Royals, and even the Orioles still match up well in a trade. 

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