Phillies

Odubel Herrera, Aaron Nola's streaks end as Flaherty stifles Phillies' bats

Odubel Herrera, Aaron Nola's streaks end as Flaherty stifles Phillies' bats

BOX SCORE 

ST. LOUIS — The Phillies watched video, studied data and scouting reports. They still had no answers for St. Louis Cardinals rookie right-hander Jack Flaherty on Sunday afternoon.

OK, they had one answer as Rhys Hoskins hit just his second homer in the last 24 games in the fourth inning to give the Phillies a brief lead. Otherwise, the day belonged to Flaherty and the Cardinals, who beat the Phillies, 5-1, at Busch Stadium as the teams split a four-game series (see first take). The Phillies are 26-18, 1½ games behind first-place Atlanta in the National League East.

Flaherty, 22, was selected 34th overall in the 2014 draft, 27 slots behind Aaron Nola. In his ninth big-league start, he out-pitched the Phillies’ ace for his first big-league win. Flaherty threw a full mix of pitches but featured mostly a fastball and slider. He struck out 13 in 7 2/3 innings. He threw 120 pitches, gave up two hits and a walk and got 24 swinging strikes, a dozen on sliders.

“He was tremendous today,” manager Gabe Kapler said. “Sometimes you have to tip your cap to the other guy. He located his fastball and slider and kept us off balance with a really gritty performance.

“I think it always matters when a team has a lack of familiarity with a pitcher, but we do our homework. We had all watched him extensively. We knew what he had and what he brought to the table. We knew his minor-league history. So we were prepared and he just beat us. He was good today.”

Carlos Santana concurred.

“He had very good command of the breaking ball,” Santana said. “It was the first time we’d seen him. He threw great. We’ll see what happens the next time we face him.”

A couple of notable Phillies’ streaks were halted. Nola’s string of 13 straight starts (dating to Sept. 7) of allowing no more than three earned runs in a start ended as he gave up seven hits and four runs in six innings.

Odubel Herrera’s streak of reaching base safely died at 45 consecutive games, 11 shy of Mike Schmidt’s team record. Ted Williams owns the all-time record at 84. Joe DiMaggio ranks second at 74 and Williams is also third at 73.

“What an incredible accomplishment,” Kapler said. “I was looking at the list before the game of guys who’ve reached base in that vicinity and, wow, there’s some Hall of Famers and perennial All-Stars on that list so he’s in good company. It’s nice to still have somebody on our club with an on-base streak in Cesar Hernandez (24), so now we shift our attention to rooting for that to keep going.”

Herrera still leads the National League in hitting at .344.

“That’s part of the game,” he said. “At some point, the streak had to end. Now I’m looking forward to starting a new streak.”

Though he left several balls over the plate that were hit well, Nola did not pitch badly. He had little margin for error given the way Flaherty pitched and he was not helped by his defense. Santana made a costly throwing error for the second straight game. The Phils made six errors in the series. They will have to clean that up in their showdown with Atlanta for first place in the NL East. The series begins Monday night at Citizens Bank Park (see story)

“We can play a tighter brand of defense,” Kapler said. “We are a good, athletic defense. We can pick it up a notch. We’re better than we showed out there on defense in general.”

Sloppy Phillies suffer embarrassing 24-4 loss to Mets in Game 1 of doubleheader

Sloppy Phillies suffer embarrassing 24-4 loss to Mets in Game 1 of doubleheader

BOX SCORE

This was about as ugly as it can get.

Less than 24 hours after one of their best wins of the season, the Phillies turned in an absolutely embarrassing performance in losing, 24-4, to the New York Mets in the first game of a doubleheader at Citizens Bank Park on Thursday.

The Phillies made four errors in the ballgame and allowed 11 unearned runs, the most since they allowed a club-record 12 in a game during the 1923 season.

Things got so ugly that the Phillies had to use two position players, Roman Quinn and Scott Kingery, to pitch the final three innings.

Quinn, who has a long injury history, got through 1 2/3 innings and 42 pitches healthy, but he was tagged for six hits, two walks and seven runs.

Kingery allowed two runs in the ninth inning. He lobbed the ball so slowly that it did not register on the stadium radar gun. Mets hitters dug in and teed off. Players in the Mets’ dugout giggled. Fans, who had booed earlier in the day, also giggled as the game was reduced to a comic act. The whole thing was an embarrassment to the sport. And to think, it came one day after the Phillies came back from three runs down to beat the Boston Red Sox, 7-4. Boston is far and away the majors' best team.

The Mets pulverized Phillies pitching for 25 hits. The Mets had 11 extra-base hits, including three homers.

Rookie lefty Ranger Suarez was called up from Triple A to start the first game of the doubleheader. He was hit hard to the tune of 11 hits and eight runs in four innings. Half of the runs Suarez allowed were unearned.

Mark Leiter Jr., also recalled earlier in the day from Triple A, was tagged for seven runs in the fifth inning. All the runs were unearned.

Maikel Franco made a pair of errors at third base. Catcher Jorge Alfaro made a throwing error and Rhys Hoskins dropped a ball in left field for another error. All the errors set up runs — multiples of them.

Poor defense is nothing new for these Phillies. They entered the game ranked second to last in the majors in defensive runs saved (minus-85), according to Fangraphs. Only Baltimore at minus-95 was worse.

The four errors gave the Phils 92 on the season, tying them with St. Louis for most in the majors.

More on the Phillies

Reminder: Phillies got Wilson Ramos for almost nothing

Reminder: Phillies got Wilson Ramos for almost nothing

A reminder after his historic Phillies debut last night: Wilson Ramos was acquired for practically nothing. 

When the surprising trade was announced on July 31 — 17 days after Ramos had injured his hamstring — it was for a player to be named later or cash considerations. 

According to Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times, the Rays took the cash. 

Teams around both leagues in need of a catcher or DH are probably kicking themselves right now. There was a trade market for Ramos in early July, with a lot of buzz about a return to the Nationals. (Matt Wieters has not had a productive offensive season.)

Then came Ramos’ hamstring injury, which apparently thinned out the market to the point that Tampa chose to take the only decent offer left, which came from the Phillies. 

Ramos last night became the first player in recorded history with at least three extra-base hits and three RBIs in his Phillies debut. He became the first Phillies catcher with three extra-base hits in a game since Chooch midway through 2014. 

There just aren’t many catchers like Ramos, which is why for weeks I’ve been writing that he’ll end up being their most impactful July addition. The last three seasons, Ramos has hit .296 with an .827 OPS. 

There are catchers like Buster Posey and J.T. Realmuto who can hit for a high average but don’t have as much power as Ramos. There are guys like Gary Sanchez, who have the power but not the ability to hit .290 to .300. Ramos has both skills, which is rare for catchers these days. 

The Phillies have seen flashes this season from Jorge Alfaro but not nearly enough consistency at the plate or behind it. A team in a pennant race needs that kind of defensive reliability from its catcher. If that catcher also happens to be perhaps the most well-rounded hitter at his position the last three years, even better. 

More on the Phillies