Phillies

World Series: Dodgers rally to force deciding Game 7

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World Series: Dodgers rally to force deciding Game 7

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LOS ANGELES -- Joc Pederson sliced a drive over the left-field wall, pounded his chest and danced around the bases, taking as many twists and turns as this World Series itself. Of course, the Los Angeles Dodgers forced the Houston Astros to Game 7.

Chris Taylor hit a tying double off Justin Verlander during a two-run rally in the sixth inning, Corey Seager followed with a go-ahead sacrifice fly and the Dodgers beat the Astros 3-1 on Tuesday night to push this dramatic Fall Classic to the ultimate game.

Pederson homered in the seventh against Joe Musgrove, connecting off the right-hander for the second time in three games to make it a record 24 long balls hit in this Series. Pederson pranced all the way to the plate, pointing at the Dodgers' dugout and rubbing his thumbs and index fingers together to indicate what a money shot it was.

Mired in a major slump earlier this season, Pederson was demoted to the minors -- and teammates began offering to pay him for opposite-field home runs in an effort to get him to hit the ball the other way.

"I kind of black out in a situation like that," said Pederson, who has three homers in the Series. "I'm going to have to re-watch it to see what I did."

Yu Darvish starts Wednesday for the Dodgers, trying to win their first title since 1988, and Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw will be ready in the bullpen. Lance McCullers Jr. goes for the Astros in the first World Series Game 7 ever at Dodger Stadium.

"It's only fitting," Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said.

Darvish was chased in the second inning of Game 2, when McCullers pitched Houston to a 5-3 victory.

"Two incredible teams, trying to get to the finish line," Astros manager A.J. Hinch said.

Two nights after a 13-12, 10-inning slugfest under the roof at Minute Maid Park, pitching dominated.

George Springer's third-inning home run against starter Rich Hill had given a 1-0 lead to Verlander and the Astros, trying for the first championship in their 56-season history. On Halloween night, a championship for a team with orange in its colors seemed appropriate.

But it served only to set up the 10th blown lead of the Series, the fifth by Houston, as Verlander fell to 9-1 with Houston.

Dodgers relievers combined for 4 1/3 scoreless innings. Brandon Morrow retired Alex Bregman on a grounder to strand the bases loaded in the fifth, winner Tony Watson got Marwin Gonzalez to fly out with two on and two outs in the sixth, and Kenta Maeda escaped two-on trouble in the seventh when third baseman Justin Turner gloved Jose Altuve's grounder and threw a one-hop throw that first baseman Cody Bellinger scooped just in time.

After wasting a ninth-inning lead in Game 2 and losing Game 5, Kenley Jansen retired six straight batters for the save and ended by striking out 40-year-old pinch-hitter Carlos Beltran.

This will be the third World Series Game 7 in four years. Ten of the last 12 teams that won Game 6 to force a seventh game also won the title, but the Dodgers lost the previous six World Series in which they trailed 3-2. They have won just one of their six championships at home, in 1963.

A heat wave over, the temperature dropped to 67 degrees at game time from 103 for last week's opener. The San Gabriel Mountains were occluded by heavy clouds.

Los Angelenos with a laid-back reputation were more energetic and on their feet for two-strike counts against Astros batters, a wave in Pantone 294 -- also known as Dodger blue. Stadium organist Dieter Ruehle greeted the Astros with "Hotel California" for the start of batting practice, but there was an un-LA-like drizzle in the middle innings.

"We feed off the crowd, for sure," Taylor said. "We feel we have a huge home-field advantage."

Yuli Gurriel, who made a racist gesture toward Darvish in Game 3, was booed loudly during introductions and each time he batted,

Verlander has 11 postseason wins but dropped to 0-4 in the Series with Detroit and Houston, which acquired him from the Tigers on Aug. 31 to win on nights like this.

The 2011 AL MVP and Cy Young Award winner, Verlander allowed just one baserunner before Austin Barnes singled leading off the sixth. Verlander bounced a pitch that hit Chase Utley on the front of his right foot, and Taylor sent a 97 mph fastball down the right-field line as Barnes came home. Seager followed with a sacrifice fly to the right-field warning track, a ball that likely would have landed in the pavilion in last week's hot air.

Verlander prevented more damage when Turner fouled out and the right-hander fanned Bellinger, who struck out four times for the second time in the Series.

Springer homered for the third straight game and fourth time in the Series, one shy of the record set by Reggie Jackson in 1977 and matched by Chase Utley in 2009. While it silenced the Dodger Stadium crowd, Astros fans erupted at a watch party in Minute Maid Park. Los Angeles has allowed home runs in all 14 of its postseason games.

Brian McCann singled leading off the fifth and Gonzalez doubled past Turner and down the left-field line. Hill struck out Josh Reddick and Verlander, and Springer was intentionally walked to load the bases.

Morrow relieved as the crowd booed Roberts' decision, and Hill slapped at four cups of liquid in the dugout, sending them spraying against the wall.

"With Verlander on the mound, I felt that was going to be the game," Roberts said.

Appearing in his sixth straight Series game, Morrow got Bregman to ground to shortstop on his second pitch.

Watson walked Reddick leading off the seventh, Evan Gattis pinch hit for Verlander and Maeda relieved. Gattis bounced to shortstop, just beating Utley's throw from second to avoid a double play. Springer reached on an infield single that bounced off Seager's glove at shortstop and into left field, and Bregman's fly to deep center allowed pinch-runner Derek Fisher to tag up and advance to third, bringing up Altuve. Walking down the dugout steps after his groundout, Altuve slammed his helmet.

Phillies ready for a 1st-place showdown with Braves

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Phillies ready for a 1st-place showdown with Braves

ST. LOUIS — The Phillies have been chasing the first-place Atlanta Braves all month in the National League East standings and never has the deficit been more than 1½ games.

That is the difference between the two teams as they get set to open their fourth series of the still young season Monday night in Philadelphia.

It is perhaps the biggest series the Phillies have hosted at Citizens Bank Park since the days of Jimmy, Chase, Ryan, Cole, Big Chuck and 257 straight sellouts.

“It should be fun,” said pitcher Jake Arrieta, who grew accustomed to playing in big series during his time with the Chicago Cubs.

The Phillies are expecting crowds between 22,000 and 27,000 for the series. 

A good showing over the next three days and those crowds will grow.

“We’re prepared and focused,” manager Gabe Kapler said. “There is a lot of adrenaline going into that series. We feel like we match up very well against them and more than anything else we’re not going to get outworked or prepared.

“We always want to see our home fans out there supporting us and since the beginning of the season since we first stepped foot in CBP, we’ve had that support and we expect nothing less going forward.”

The Phillies have had several chances in the last week to overtake the Braves in the standings. Each time the Braves have stumbled, the Phillies have stumbled. The Phils entered Sunday’s game against the Cardinals a half-game behind the Braves. The Phillies lost and the Braves rallied for six runs in the ninth to beat Miami.

So far this season, the Braves have been the Phillies’ nemesis. Atlanta has won six of the nine meetings. The Phillies have built much of their 26-18 record by going 18-4 against teams from outside the NL East. Meanwhile, against the division, they are just 8-14. That will have to change if the Phillies want to stay in the race.

The Phils have hit just .210 as a team in nine games against Atlanta this season and averaged just 3.3 runs per game. Phillies pitching has a 5.47 ERA against the Braves.

“We haven’t necessarily played the Braves all that well this year,” Arrieta said. “You just have to learn from that.

“It all comes down to how well your starter pitches that day. If you come out and give up four in the first — I’m not saying you can’t win that game but it makes it a lot more difficult. So the emphasis has to be on starting pitching, especially early in the game to set the tone. You put two or three zeroes up there in the first few innings and you can start to control the ball game. We take pride in setting the tone and keeping the game close.”

Arrieta gave the series its proper importance but mixed in some perspective.

“They’re all big,” he said. “It can come down to the last game of the season whether you get in the playoffs, so they’re all big, especially in the division.”

The Phils have not had a winning season since 2011, the last time they made the playoffs. Last year, they went 66-96.

Arrieta is not surprised the Phils, with one of the majors’ youngest rosters, have gotten off to such a good start this season.

“I think our young guys know it, but at the same time, I think they’re somewhat oblivious to it, which is a good thing,” he said. “You don’t want to look at the standings every single day. Sometimes it’s good to evaluate your season month by month. Try to have a winning month, turn the page. I think that’s the measure of a good team. Have a winning April, have a winning May and at the end of the year, you look up and you’re 25 games over .500.

“We have to put the standings out of sight, out of mind and focus on preparing, executing quality pitches, having good at-bats and winning that day. Let the wins stack up and assess at end of the month.”

Though there is a lot of season left — and the Nationals have only begun to awaken — the Phils could sure use some wins against Atlanta.

The biggest series at Citizens Bank Park since the Glory Days begins Monday night.

Here are the pitching matchups for the series:

Monday night – RHP Nick Pivetta (3-2, 3.72) vs. RHP Mike Foltynewicz (3-2, 2.87)

Tuesday night – RHP Vince Velasquez (4-4, 4.37) vs. RHP Brandon McCarthy (4-2, 5.05)

Wednesday night – RHP Jake Arrieta (3-2, 2.82) vs. LHP Luiz Gohara (0-0, 1.29)

Odubel Herrera, Aaron Nola's streaks end as Flaherty stifles Phillies' bats

Odubel Herrera, Aaron Nola's streaks end as Flaherty stifles Phillies' bats

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ST. LOUIS — The Phillies watched video, studied data and scouting reports. They still had no answers for St. Louis Cardinals rookie right-hander Jack Flaherty on Sunday afternoon.

OK, they had one answer as Rhys Hoskins hit just his second homer in the last 24 games in the fourth inning to give the Phillies a brief lead. Otherwise, the day belonged to Flaherty and the Cardinals, who beat the Phillies, 5-1, at Busch Stadium as the teams split a four-game series (see first take). The Phillies are 26-18, 1½ games behind first-place Atlanta in the National League East.

Flaherty, 22, was selected 34th overall in the 2014 draft, 27 slots behind Aaron Nola. In his ninth big-league start, he out-pitched the Phillies’ ace for his first big-league win. Flaherty threw a full mix of pitches but featured mostly a fastball and slider. He struck out 13 in 7 2/3 innings. He threw 120 pitches, gave up two hits and a walk and got 24 swinging strikes, a dozen on sliders.

“He was tremendous today,” manager Gabe Kapler said. “Sometimes you have to tip your cap to the other guy. He located his fastball and slider and kept us off balance with a really gritty performance.

“I think it always matters when a team has a lack of familiarity with a pitcher, but we do our homework. We had all watched him extensively. We knew what he had and what he brought to the table. We knew his minor-league history. So we were prepared and he just beat us. He was good today.”

Carlos Santana concurred.

“He had very good command of the breaking ball,” Santana said. “It was the first time we’d seen him. He threw great. We’ll see what happens the next time we face him.”

A couple of notable Phillies’ streaks were halted. Nola’s string of 13 straight starts (dating to Sept. 7) of allowing no more than three earned runs in a start ended as he gave up seven hits and four runs in six innings.

Odubel Herrera’s streak of reaching base safely died at 45 consecutive games, 11 shy of Mike Schmidt’s team record. Ted Williams owns the all-time record at 84. Joe DiMaggio ranks second at 74 and Williams is also third at 73.

“What an incredible accomplishment,” Kapler said. “I was looking at the list before the game of guys who’ve reached base in that vicinity and, wow, there’s some Hall of Famers and perennial All-Stars on that list so he’s in good company. It’s nice to still have somebody on our club with an on-base streak in Cesar Hernandez (24), so now we shift our attention to rooting for that to keep going.”

Herrera still leads the National League in hitting at .344.

“That’s part of the game,” he said. “At some point, the streak had to end. Now I’m looking forward to starting a new streak.”

Though he left several balls over the plate that were hit well, Nola did not pitch badly. He had little margin for error given the way Flaherty pitched and he was not helped by his defense. Santana made a costly throwing error for the second straight game. The Phils made six errors in the series. They will have to clean that up in their showdown with Atlanta for first place in the NL East. The series begins Monday night at Citizens Bank Park (see story)

“We can play a tighter brand of defense,” Kapler said. “We are a good, athletic defense. We can pick it up a notch. We’re better than we showed out there on defense in general.”