Aaron McKie

The Fran Dunphy era ends as Temple falls to Belmont in First Four of NCAA Tournament

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The Fran Dunphy era ends as Temple falls to Belmont in First Four of NCAA Tournament

Updated: 1:31 a.m. 

DAYTON, Ohio — A few seconds were still left on the clock when Fran Dunphy headed to midcourt for his final postgame handshake, the outcome long decided. Belmont was simply too much for his Owls.

Nobody else in the NCAA Tournament is excited to face their efficient offense, either.

Kevin McClain scored 29 points and led the decisive second-half run as Belmont got its first NCAA Tournament win, pulling away to an 81-70 victory Tuesday night and ending Dunphy's career in the First Four.

The 11th-seeded Bruins (27-5) play Maryland on Thursday in the East Region.

"We belong in this tournament," said McClain, who finished two points shy of his career high. "You can see that."

Belmont got an at-large bid after losing to Murray State in the Ohio Valley Conference Tournament title game. The Bruins showed the selection committee's faith was not misplaced, getting the breakthrough win on their eighth try.

"I think that they can play in this atmosphere and this is important," coach Rick Byrd said. "I didn't think many times we played well, or knew what we were in offensively, but they found a way to win. And you never play perfect, and I think they've got some toughness about them."

The loss sent Temple (23-10) into a transition. Dunphy is retiring after his 13th season at Temple, where he replaced John Chaney. Dunphy previously coached 17 seasons at Penn.

"The game of basketball has given me way more than I have given to it," Dunphy said.

He was hoping to coach another day, but Belmont's high-scoring offense pulled away at the end. Senior guard Shizz Alston Jr. led the Owls with 21 points.

"That team is smart," Alston said. "They only do what they're good at."

The Bruins entered the tournament second in the nation at 87.4 points per game. The Owls' aim was to slow the high-percentage offense just enough to give themselves a chance. Temple hung in during a first half that featured five lead changes and ended with Belmont ahead 37-31.

The Bruins pushed their lead to 11 points by hitting their first two shots in the second half. Alston, who led the American Athletic Conference at 19.7 points per game, hit three 3-pointers as the Owls surged ahead 50-46. Alston has been the Owls' catalyst, scoring at least 20 points in each of his last nine games.

McClain led a 16-3 run that put Belmont ahead to stay. McClain finished two points shy of his career high.

The Bruins' balanced offense had more than enough even though leading scorer Dylan Windler was held to five points on 2-of-7 shooting, matching his season low. Windler came in averaging 21.4 points.

Big picture 
Temple: Former Owls star Aaron McKie takes over for Dunphy. McKie is an assistant on Dunphy's staff. The Owls haven't won an NCAA Tournament game since 2013, when they beat N.C. State at Dayton before losing in the second round. They went 2-8 in eight appearances under Dunphy.

Belmont: The Bruins got only the second at-large NCAA Tournament bid in Ohio Valley Conference history, along with Middle Tennessee in 1987. They'd dropped their seven appearances when they had automatic bids.

Tourney history 
Temple's last NCAA Tournament win was in 2013 over N.C. State in Dayton. The Owls are 33-33 all-time in the tournament.

Belmont is making its eighth NCAA appearance since 2006. Its closest previous brush with a victory was a one-point loss to Duke in 2008.

Moose tracks
Six-foot-11 freshman center Nick Muszynski missed the OVC title game with a sprained left ankle, injured the previous game. Muszynski, whose nickname is Moose, started Tuesday and had 16 points and four rebounds. He wore a protective boot after the game.

"I thought he played terrific," Byrd said. "We just didn't know what we were going to get. Frankly, yesterday in practice he didn't look very good at all. But he really showed a lot today."

Philly fewer 
Philadelphia's Big 5 rivalry lost two of its longtime coaches Tuesday. In addition to Dunphy heading into retirement, Saint Joseph's fired Phil Martelli after his 24th season.

No stage fright 
The crowd at University of Dayton Arena was 11,874, the second-largest Belmont has played in front of this season. The high was 14,804 at Mackey Arena on Dec. 29, when Belmont lost to Purdue 73-62.

Up next 
Belmont heads to Jacksonville, Florida, for its game against Maryland.

Zoo's Views Podcast: A conversation with Aaron McKie

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Zoo's Views Podcast: A conversation with Aaron McKie

On this edition of Zoo's Views, Marc Zumoff talks with Aaron McKie. McKie, the coach in waiting for the Temple's men's basketball team, discusses the biggest influencers in his life.

Also, what makes his relationship with Allen Iverson special.

1:00 - Fran Dunphy's farewell tour.
4:30 - The impact his aunt had on his life.
6:00 - Some of the great coaches he played for.
16:30 - His impact on Allen Iverson's career and life.
20:30 - The 2000-2001 Sixers team.
23:30 - His thoughts on the current Sixers team.

Subscribe and rate Zoo's Views:
Apple Podcasts / Google Play / Stitcher / Spotify / Art19

Fran Dunphy will step aside after next season, be replaced by Aaron McKie

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Fran Dunphy will step aside after next season, be replaced by Aaron McKie

Next season will be the last for Fran Dunphy at Temple, a source confirmed to NBC Sports Philadelphia's John Clark.

Dunphy, 69, will step aside after what will be his 13th season with the Owls next year. Former Sixers guard and Temple alum Aaron McKie, who has been on Dunphy's staff as an assistant since 2014, will take the program's reins after Dunphy steps aside.  

The move was first reported by CBS Sports' Seth Davis.

Dunphy's legendary status in the city reaches well beyond North Broad Street. Dunphy has been a part of Big 5 basketball for the last 51 years, beginning his journey as a guard for La Salle (1967-70) before joining the staff as an assistant coach.

Dunphy was named the head coach at Penn in 1989, where he cemented his legacy during an unprecedented 17-year stint that featured a 310-163 record, including an unheard of 48 straight Ivy League wins and 10 Ivy League titles.

In 2005, Dunphy jumped ship to Temple, where he quickly turned around the program, winning the first of three straight Atlantic 10 championships in just his second season at the helm. 

Now, Dunphy is Temple's third-most winningest coach with a 230-136 record. 

Should Dunphy retire after next season, he will leave behind an impeccable coaching career, featuring a 540-299 career record, including 17 20-win seasons, 16 NCAA Tournament appearances and 14 conference championships.

McKie (1991-94) is sixth on Temple's all-time scoring list, averaging 17.9 points per game. McKie, who spent eight years with the Sixers, has served as an assistant under Dunphy since 2014.