Brandon Brooks

How many players from Super Bowl team will get into Eagles Hall of Fame?

How many players from Super Bowl team will get into Eagles Hall of Fame?

There are 36 players in the Eagles Hall of Fame, from Bill Hewitt, who made his Eagles debut in 1936, to David Akers, an Eagle until 2010.

The 1960 team has the most Hall of Famers, with eight, and the 1988, 1989 and 1990 Eagles — despite not winning a playoff game — had seven, as did the 1961 team.

The 1948 NFL Championship team had five and and the 1949 NFL Championship team had six.

The last Eagles team with more than one future Hall of Famer was the 2009 team, with Donovan McNabb, Brian Westbrook, Jeremiah Trotter and Akers.

All of which got us thinking about the 2018 Super Bowl championship team.

How many players from that team will one day be enshrined in the Eagles Hall of Fame?

And can the 2018 team break the 1960 team’s record?

Let’s take a look at the candidates:

Brandon Brooks
Like Darren Sproles and Malcolm Jenkins, Brooks never made a Pro Bowl until he joined the Eagles. He’s now made three straight, which ties him with Jason Kelce for most Pro Bowls in franchise history among interior linemen.

Verdict: Possible

Brent Celek
Never made a Pro Bowl but played 175 games in an Eagles uniform — fourth-most in franchise history — and ranks fifth with 398 cathes and ninth with 4,998 yards.

Verdict: Possible

Fletcher Cox
Has made five straight Pro Bowls (and counting), and only Reggie White and Pete Pihos have made more. Ranks seventh in franchise history with 48 sacks, most ever by an Eagles defensive tackle. Named to the NFL Team of the Decade for the 2010s.

Verdict: Lock

Zach Ertz
Already second in franchise history with 525 catches and fifth with 5,743 yards. Has more catches than any tight end in NFL history after seven seasons. Had the game-winning TD catch in the Super Bowl.

Verdict: Lock

Nick Foles
Only started 37 games in an Eagles uniform but went 25-12, made a Pro Bowl in 2013, tied an NFL record with 7 TDs vs. the Raiders, compiled a 98.8 career postseason passer rating and had a record-setting 2017 postseason with six TDs, one INT, 73 perent completion and a 115.7 passer rating. And was Super Bowl MVP.

Verdict: Lock

Brandon Graham
Hasn’t made a Pro Bowl, but ranks fifth in franchise history with 51 sacks, has played third-most games in franchise history by a defensive lineman (12 below Trent Cole’s 155) and made one of the biggest plays in franchise history with his strip-sack of Tom Brady in the Super Bowl.

Verdict: Possible

Malcolm Jenkins
Made his first three career Pro Bowls during his six seasons with the Eagles. Had 11 INTs, 12 forced fumbles and 5 ½ sacks as an Eagle and never missed a game or a practice.

Verdict: Probable

Lane Johnson 
After two suspensions in his first four seasons, has settled in as one of NFL’s top right tackles, making three straight Pro Bowls and First Team All-Pro in 2017. 

Verdict: Possible

Jason Kelce
The three-time First Team All-Pro and three-time Pro Bowler is the greatest interior lineman in franchise history. Should get into the Eagles Hall of Fame just based on his speech following the Super Bowl parade.

Verdict: Lock

Jason Peters 
Made seven Pro Bowls as an Eagle and was a two-time First Team All-Pro. Only Chuck Bednarik has made more Pro Bowls as an Eagle. Named to the Team of the Decade for the 2010s.

Verdict: Lock

Darren Sproles 
Sproles made the Pro Bowl after each of his first three seasons with the Eagles. In all, Sproles piled up 2,790 scrimmage yards, 146 receptions, 18 touchdowns, a 4.5 rushing average and four punt return TDs as an Eagle. 

Verdict: Possible

Carson Wentz 
He’s put together a fine body of regular-season work — Wentz is the only QB in NFL history with three straight seasons of 20 TD passes and seven or fewer INTs — but Wentz’s chances of getting into the Eagles Hall of Fame depend on the postseason success he has the rest of his Eagles career.

Verdict: Possible

Eagles Hall of Famers (players only)

PK David Akers (1999-2010)
CB Eric Allen (1988-94)
LB Maxie Baughan (1960-65)
LB-C Chuck Bednarik (1949-62)
LB Bill Bergey (1974-80)
S Bill Bradley (1969-76)
CB Tom Brookshier (1953-1961)
OT Bob Brown (1964-68)
DT Jerome Brown (1987-91)
RB Timmy Brown (1960-67)
WR Harold Carmichael (1971-83)
QB Randall Cunningham (1985-95)
S Brian Dawkins (1996-2008)
E-DE Bill Hewitt (1936-43)
QB Ron Jaworski (1977-1986)
LB Seth Joyner (1986-93)
QB Sonny Jurgensen (1957-63)
RB Ollie Matson (1964-66)
WR Tommy McDonald (1957-63)
QB Donovan McNabb (1999-2009)
RB Wilbert Montgomery (1977-84)
E Pete Pihos (1947-55)
WR Mike Quick (1982 -90)
E Pete Retzlaff (1956-66)
C Jim Ringo (1964-67)
DE Clyde Simmons (1986-93)
OT Jerry Sisemore  (1973-84)
LB Jeremiah Trotter (1998-09)
QB Norm Van Brocklin (1958-60)
RB Steve Van Buren (1944-51)
CB Troy Vincent (1996-03)
OT Stan Walters (1975-83)
WR-TE Bobby Walston (1943-51)
RB Brian Westbrook (2002-09)
DE Reggie White (1985-92)
OT Al Wistert (1943-51)
C Alex Wojciechowicz (1946-50)

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Eagles' players on Pro Football Focus's Best of 2010s list highlight obvious pattern

Eagles' players on Pro Football Focus's Best of 2010s list highlight obvious pattern

Pro Football Focus released its full (ostensibly scientific but still subjective) list of the 101 best players of the 2010s on Thursday, and Eagles fans won't be surprised by how the team is represented.

The list, which runs from Eric Berry at No. 101 to Tom Brady at No. 1, includes eight current or former Eagles, all of whom - big surprise - play on either the offensive or defensive lines.

Here's a look at where each Eagles representative is situated, including the years during the 2010s which they played for the Birds:

14. Evan Mathis (2011-2014)
19. Jason Peters (2010-2019)
42. Brandon Graham (2010-2019)
45. Fletcher Cox (2012-2019)
52. Jason Kelce (2011-2019)
70. Brandon Brooks (2016-2019)
74. Michael Bennett (2018)
79. Lane Johnson (2013-2019)

I've got to say, while he had an incredible decade, listing Evan Mathis all the way up at No. 14 certainly surprised me. And judging by the responses PFF recived on Twitter, other football fans felt the same way.

Something I wasn't surprised by: the complete lack of Eagles skill players appearing on the list. The list featured 16 wide receivers, four running backs, and three tight ends, and the Birds were conspicuously absent from those inclusions.

We all know that the Eagles, particularly in the Howie Roseman years, love investing in the offensive and defensive lines (just look at their draft picks) and building out from there. The fact that the Eagles could craft an entire starting offensive line, and a frightening 3-4 defensive line, from the players on this list shows that they've found some serious talent in the trenches.

Would it probably help if they had, say, just one wide receiver or running back who deemed inclusion on the list, as imperfect as it is? Absolutely. It's fair to wonder how close guys like Zach Ertz and LeSean McCoy were to landing on this list, but the fact is the Eagles simply haven't had the kind of talent at playmaking positions that they have along the lines.

And on the defensive side, a dozen cornerbacks made the list, while the Eagles spent the decade lining up guys like Bradley Fletcher and Byron Maxwell across from NFC studs like Dez Bryant, Julio Jones, and Michael Thomas.

Take it or leave it - the team missed the postseason five times from 2010 to 2019, and also won the franchise's first Super Bowl - the Eagles are who they are, and while they invested a number of resources in the wide receiver position this offseason, don't expect a great change any time soon.

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Are the 2020 Eagles better or worse on the offensive line?

Are the 2020 Eagles better or worse on the offensive line?

Executive vice president and general manager Howie Roseman says the Eagles are a better football team after free agency and the draft. We're putting his claim to the test, breaking down the depth chart position by position to examine whether the roster really improved or actually took a step back this offseason.

The series continues with the offensive line, where the Eagles have decided to move on from Jason Peters, at least for the time being.

Better

Nothing against Jordan Mailata, Nate Herbig and Sua Opeta, who could become very good players for all we know. They just don't have the greatest pedigree. Mailata never even played football until two years ago, and the other two were undrafted free agents.

The Eagles did a smart thing — especially given Jason Peters' departure — and at least provided competition among the reserves. That meant selecting two Auburn linemen in the draft — Jack Driscoll in the fourth round and Prince Tega Wanogho in the sixth.

Driscoll is an experienced, versatile linemen who played tackle and has experience at guard too, though he's not the biggest or most athletic. Wanogho is a little more raw, but is built like a prototypical left tackle who tumbled in the draft due in part to a knee injury believed to be minor. With only Matt Pryor's spot on the bench seemingly safe, both rookies could potentially crack the roster.

Worse

No matter how high you are on Andre Dillard — and enthusiasm has definitely waned — or how down you were on Peters, there's no denying the Eagles took a step back at least in the short term.

Peters played well last season when he wasn't coming off the field with an injury. No, of course he isn't at the level he was during nine Pro Bowl seasons. Look around the NFL, though. How many teams have a better left tackle right now? Generously, that number is probably 10 and no more. So whether you're of the mind Peters constantly coming in and out of the lineup is a problem or Dillard just needs to learn and take his lumps to hopefully one day be worth of taking a first ballot Hall of Famer's place, it's an obvious downgrade.

The same

On the bright side, the Eagles anticipate returning the other four members of the O-line, three of whom are Pro Bowl-caliber players right now. Jason Kelce remains one of the best centers in the league, Lane Johnson is one of the top right tackles, and Brandon Brooks is one the best offensive linemen in the league, period. Isaac Seumalo is a pretty underrated player, too.

As good as this group is, continuity is also important for offensive lines, which means this is one instance where staying the same is almost like improving.

The unknown

We haven't seen enough of Dillard to know whether he'll live up the hype of being a top-10 talent who fell to the Eagles late in the first round in 2019. There's also been talk of Peters possibly returning, something people should warm up to since the club doesn't seem so thrilled about his successor.

Another question mark flying under the radar here is whether or not the Mailata experiment is going anywhere. It's been two years, and while the former Aussie rugby star did well in some preseason games, we have yet to see him pressed into a meaningful situation. Can Mailata play? Is he even a lock to make the roster at this point?

Better or worse?

Now that free agency has come and gone and Peters is still a free agent — not to mention all the talk of Dillard being on the trade block — I've come around on the Eagles bringing the 38-year-old back at the right price. The bottom line is, on Week 1 of 2020, he's the far superior option at left tackle.

It's good the Eagles drafted players like Driscoll and Wanogho, either of whom wind up the heir apparent should Dillard falter. With Peters, the rookies make the line a deeper unit. Without Peters, they're the tiny fire extinguishers behind the broken glass for when the building is already engulfed in flames. 

Worse 

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