Brandy Halladay

Brandy Halladay gives beautiful speech for Roy Halladay's Baseball Hall of Fame induction

Brandy Halladay gives beautiful speech for Roy Halladay's Baseball Hall of Fame induction

Shortly after Sunday afternoon's Phillies-Pirates game went into a rain delay, Brandy Halladay took the podium at the Baseball Hall of Fame induction ceremony in Cooperstown, New York.

It was a perfectly timed rain delay, allowing us to all commemorate the late Roy Halladay, who joined Baseball Royalty along with Harold Baines, Edgar Martinez, Mike Mussina, Mariano Rivera and Lee Smith.

Brandy, Halladay's widow, gave a beautiful speech full of love, gratitude and thanks.

Halladay, who died tragically in a plane crash in November 2017 at the age of 40, was an imposingly dominant pitcher known for his work ethic and dedication to the game. He won the 2003 AL Cy Young Award with the Blue Jays and the 2010 NL Cy Young Award with the Phillies. In Philadelphia, no one will ever forget the perfect game and playoff no-hitter.

For Brandy and her two sons Braden and Ryan, they will never forget the memories and support.

Below are portions of Brandy's touching message — which was broadcast on MLB Network and can be watched in the video above — along with social media reaction from the day.

To both of the teams that we were blessed to be a part of — the Blue Jays and the Phillies. Thank you for allowing us to grow up, to fail over and over and finally learn how to succeed within your organizations. There were some really amazing years but there were some really tough ones, too, and you never gave up on him.

More than anything, he would want both organizations to know that they hold a huge place in our heart and always will. Evidence of their love for us and our love for them, as well, was shown all week as they came together as one to celebrate Roy — and that means the world to me. To both organizations, I can't thank you enough.

I think that Roy would want everyone to know that people are not perfect. We are all imperfect and flawed in one way or another. We all struggle, but with hard work, humility and dedication, imperfect people can still have perfect moments. Roy was blessed in his life and in his career to have some perfect moments, but I believe that they were only possible because of the man he strived to be, the teammate that he was and the people that he was so blessed to be on the field with.

Here is more on Halladay, courtesy of NBC Sports Philadelphia's Jim Salisbury:

Halladay, Phillies rout Nationals in season opener

Revisiting the night of Roy Halladay's perfect game in Miami

Halladay tosses second no-hitter in playoff history

Charlie Manuel keeps his promise to Roy Halladay's son

Through the tears, the Halladay family finds joy in Cooperstown honor

Remembering what mattered most to Roy Halladay

A celebration of life: Thank you, Roy Halladay

Halladay's greatest hits with the Phillies

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

It's time to change the narrative about Philly sports fans

It's time to change the narrative about Philly sports fans

Old narratives often die hard in network television. Especially when it comes to sports broadcasting. 

Game in New York, you’re almost guaranteed to see an aerial shot of the Statue of Liberty or Times Square. Redskins play on a Thursday night, Lincoln Memorial. Chicago, Lake Michigan scenic shot. Philadelphia, cheesesteaks being fried on the grill at Pat’s and Geno’s or the Rocky statue. You can almost book it.

What you can also bank on is a producer in New York or L.A. (usually not from Philadelphia) pre-producing a package that week leading into a nationally televised game in which snowballs being thrown at Santa Claus or something of that ilk is referenced. If it’s not done in the package, the subject is injected or introduced to the lead broadcasters in the production meetings leading up to said game. The old Philadelphia-fans-are-knuckle-dragging-cretins angle. 

It’s tired. It’s lazy. It’s predictable. And it’s gone on for years. It’s the easiest way to push the buttons of a Philadelphia sports fan. But there may be an end in sight to the false narrative.

Take the last couple of years for example. Let’s go back to the 2017 NFL draft, held at the Ben Franklin Parkway. It was a game-changer for the league. The outdoor setting was perfect, the weather could not have been better, but it was the fans that stood out. They came out in droves. They lustily cheered on anything the Eagles did. They had fun with the commissioner, booing him upon first sight — and Roger Goodell played along beautifully. They jeered Drew Pearson, who attempted to give them the business. Brian Westbrook responded in kind the next day. Philly fans showed the world what passion was those three days. The NFL noticed. So did virtually every national broadcaster.  

Fast-forward to last season with the Eagles and the absolute domination by the fans at road games. This was nothing new but it was taken to a different level in 2017. Exhibit A, the Chargers' game in L.A. was an absolute takeover; it was an Eagles home game. Other cities do not travel that way. 

Then on to the Super Bowl championship parade. Broad Street and the Parkway covered in a sea of green with a jolly green giant dressed in a Mummers suit speaking for all those misrepresented fans who didn’t have that platform. It was epic. 

To the baseball team over the course of the last month. Chase Utley returned to a three-day love-fest. And this past weekend, a stirring, heart-wrenching speech from Brandy Halladay, the wife of the late Roy Halladay, about how this city has embraced her and her family through their most trying time. The weekend was capped off by nothing but cheers for prodigal son, Jayson Werth. Instances like Werth’s introduction — if it was anything but warm — would have been chum for the national narrative that Philadelphia fans are the worst.  

Lastly was Brian Dawkins' induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Not surprisingly, his devotees showed up in droves, outnumbering any other group. Dawkins closed his speech acknowledging and thanking them. It was a perfect ending to an emotionally draining oration. Oh, by the way, 40,000 people showed up for a practice Sunday evening at the Linc.

Who knows if any of the above evidence will end the false perception put forth by the Michael Wilbons, Colin Cowherds and Skip Baylesses of the world. Not to mention those network suits. 

Perhaps it was Union supporters, Sons of Ben, echoed by esteemed philosopher and poet, Jason Kelce, who put it best:

“We’re from Philly, f------ Philly, no one likes us, we don’t care.”

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