David Robertson

Roman Quinn sidelined again, high-priced David Robertson out for next season

Roman Quinn sidelined again, high-priced David Robertson out for next season

The injured list is Roman Quinn’s unfortunate home away from home. And now, the 26-year-old outfielder is back there for the third time this season.

Quinn suffered a strained right groin muscle in the ninth inning of Friday night’s game at Citizens Bank Park. It is a similar injury to the one that forced him to spend a month on the IL earlier this season, though not as severe.

The injury comes at a time when Quinn’s exciting talents seemed to be coming together. He was hitting .368 with a 1.139 OPS in 13 games in August. He had a double, a triple, three homers and was 4 for 4 in stolen base attempts.

There is probably enough time left in the season for Quinn to make it back, but it’s safe to say he’ll miss at least a couple of weeks and that's a loss to the Phillies' lineup.

Injuries have been a huge and frustrating issue for the likable switch-hitter who was the Phillies’ second-round draft pick in 2011 out of the Florida panhandle town of Port St. Joe.

Quinn has missed significant time in his minor- and major-league career with a torn quadriceps, a torn Achilles tendon, a strained elbow ligament, a torn ligament in his middle finger, a concussion and a broken toe. He missed the start of this season while recovering from an oblique strain suffered in spring training then went down with a groin injury in May.

With Quinn out, the Phillies will likely turn to Adam Haseley more often in center field.

The Phillies filled Quinn’s roster spot by adding reliever Jared Hughes. He was picked up off waivers from Cincinnati earlier in the week.

There was more injury news Saturday. As expected, Jake Arrieta will have season-ending surgery to clean up a bone spur in his elbow (see story). The surgery will happen before the end of the month and he’ll have plenty of time to get ready for spring training. Arrieta is under contract for $20 million next season.

David Robertson will not be ready for spring training. In fact, he probably will not pitch next season. The team said he had Tommy John surgery on Thursday. That typically requires a recovery of at least 14 months. 

Robertson, 34, signed a two-year, $23 million deal with the Phillies in December. He ended up pitching just 6 2/3 innings over seven appearances before landing on the IL with a sore elbow in April.

The Phillies have sunk some serious money into veteran relievers and gotten little in return because of injuries. Pat Neshek, 38, signed a two-year, $16.25 million contract before the 2018 season. He pitched in just 30 games last season and 20 this season. He has only pitched once since May 23 and likely will not pitch again for the Phillies. Tommy Hunter, 33, signed a two-year, $19 million deal before the 2018 season. He pitched in 65 games last season but just five this season because of an elbow injury that required surgery.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies

David Robertson's career in jeopardy as he faces season-ending surgery

David Robertson's career in jeopardy as he faces season-ending surgery

David Robertson’s season is over.

His career could be over.

The right-handed reliever, one of the acquisitions that gave the Phillies optimism over the winter, revealed on Wednesday that he needs surgery to repair an elbow injury. Robertson is 34 and has carried a heavy load over his career. There is no timetable for his recovery. He’s not even certain he’ll pitch again.

“Obviously, I've had those thoughts,” he said. “It's tough for me to deal with that.”

Robertson will know more about his chances of recovery after he gets a second opinion, likely from orthopedist James Andrews. Robertson was diagnosed with an injury to his flexor tendon in April. He recently had a setback that included additional damage to his ulna collateral ligament, according to Phillies doctors. He is hopeful that the injury is limited to his flexor tendon, but knows Tommy John surgery is a possibility, as well. Flexor tendon surgery would require six to eight months of rehab. Tommy John surgery can be a year or more.

“I’m hoping it’s just the flexor,” he said. “If I can get everything repaired as soon as possible and get myself in rehab as soon as possible, I think I can make it back and still be a part of this organization and pitch next year.”

Robertson, a workhorse who pitched in at least 60 games nine times for the Yankees and White Sox, signed a two-year, $23 million contract with the Phillies in December. He pitched in just seven games for the Phillies before going on the IL.

The Phillies have not gotten good results from high-priced veteran relief pitchers. Pat Neshek, who signed a two-year, $16.25 million deal before the 2018 season, missed significant time last season and again this season and team officials are not optimistic he will pitch again this season. Tommy Hunter, who signed a two-year, $18 million deal before last season, pitched in 65 games last year but just five this season. He is slated to have elbow surgery in the coming weeks.

Robertson, Neshek and Hunter were supposed to be a triumvirate of bullpen effectiveness for the Phillies.

Instead, they are collectively just one of a number of things that have gone wrong for the team in 2019.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies

One big way Tommy Hunter could help Phillies over final 75-80 games

One big way Tommy Hunter could help Phillies over final 75-80 games

A key piece of the Phillies' bullpen is nearly ready to return. Tommy Hunter, out all season with a flexor strain, could be activated as early as this weekend while the Phillies are in Miami.

Hunter pitched two scoreless innings for Reading on a rehab assignment Tuesday night. He struck out two and got a double play ball, needing just 18 pitches to get through the two innings.

Because Hunter has been out the entire first half, the Phillies would ideally like to get him in back-to-back games during his rehab stint but won't delay his activation too long if they cannot.

Hunter will be a welcomed addition to the Phillies' injury-ravaged bullpen and should be in a primary setup role before too long. He bounced back from an inconsistent first half in 2018 to post a 2.91 ERA over his final 30 appearances.

One big way Hunter should help the Phillies is against left-handed hitters. He is a right-handed reliever but relies heavily on his cutter, a pitch he uses to jam lefties or backdoor them for a strike. 

The Phillies can't turn to Adam Morgan or Jose Alvarez to match up with every lefty they face, so they need right-handed relievers who can retire lefties. So far this season, their righties have not done it effectively. Lefties have hit .325 against the right-handed group of Pat Neshek, Juan Nicasio, Edgar Garcia, Edubray Ramos and Seranthony Dominguez.

There is still a chance for Hunter to earn some of this year's $9 million salary. If he can stay healthy, his arm will be a fresh one in the second half.

Other injury updates

• David Robertson (flexor strain) is still several weeks away. The Phillies have gotten frustratingly little out of Robertson, Hunter and Neshek this season, a trio combining to earn $25 million.

• Adam Haseley (groin) will play nine innings tonight for Reading.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies