Donovan McNabb

Terrell Owens 40-yard dash shows he could still catch passes in the NFL today

Terrell Owens 40-yard dash shows he could still catch passes in the NFL today

Terrell Owens brings up plenty of emotions for Philly sports fans, but one will always be awe. In his prime, Owens was purely awesome. 

And at 46 years old, it turns out, the Hall of Fame wideout is still capable of producing that feeling.

Owens raced a 40-yard dash against Kansas City Chiefs wide receiver Tyreek Hill, likely the fastest player in the NFL, in a video published to Hill's YouTube page Tuesday.

While Hill was ultimately the faster dude on the field - obviously - it's astounding to watch Owens' speed, considering his age. The race begins around the 16:50 mark in this video:

Owens runs a (hand-timed, and estimated) 4.42 40-yard dash, shortly after running a three-quarters-field sprint.

That's ridiculous.

Owens looks as physically fit today as he did during his 15-year NFL career. I don't even know how that's possible.

It's not surprising that Owens complains, after the field-length race, that he wants to play more football, but feels he's being locked out because of his age.

It feels insane to say, but I'll say it: Owens could play in the NFL this fall.

Hill himself tweeted that Owens is faster than wideouts currently in the league:

He's still in incredible shape, he still has the speed, and he's still 6-foot-3. Good luck.

One of the more insane things about Owens' career is that... he never really tailed off. Like, at all.

Sure, he slowed down from the ridiculous volume numbers he put up during his prime with the 49ers, Eagles, and Cowboys. Those numbers were impossible to maintain for anyone. 

But in his last season in the league, Owens caught 72 passes for 983 yards and nine touchdowns in just 14 games with the Bengals. Across 16 games, that's 82 catches, 1,123 yards, and 10 touchdowns - good for 20th, 18th, and 2nd in the league, respectively, in 2019.

It's hard to imagine Owens would be putting up those numbers a decade later... but it also would've been hard to imagine that, at 46 years old, Owens would still be this dang fast, and here we are.

Owens' short-lived time in Philly is one of the ultimate "what-ifs" in this city's sports history. If he and the Eagles' organization had managed to get along, reach a long-term deal, and string together at least five more years of that Owens-McNabb connection? Whew boy. I don't think Nick Foles would've been the first Super Bowl MVP in franchise history.

What a unique athlete.

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The Eagles all-time team: Donovan McNabb earns the QB spot

The Eagles all-time team: Donovan McNabb earns the QB spot

Over the next few weeks, we'll be unveiling our all-time Eagles team. 

We enlisted the help of Eagles reporters Reuben Frank and Dave Zangaro, Quick Slants hosts Derrick Gunn and Barrett Brooks and Quick Slants producer Mike Mulhern for voting. 

We asked each person to rank their top five players at 16 different positions. A first-place vote was worth five points, a second-place vote was worth four, and so on. 

Up first: Quarterback

Complete voting 

1. Donovan McNabb = 24 
2. Randall Cunningham = 17
3. Nick Foles = 15
4. Ron Jaworski = 9
5. Norm Van Brocklin = 7
6. Carson Wentz = 3

The breakdown
McNabb wasn’t a unanimous No. 1, but he got four of five first-place votes and Super Bowl MVP Nick Foles got the other. But Randall Cunningham edged out Foles for second, with two second-place votes and three third-place votes. No two voters agreed on Foles, who got a first-place vote, a second-place vote, a third-place vote, a fourth-place vote and a fifth-place vote.

Current quarterback Carson Wentz got only two votes — a fourth and a fifth. Norm Van Brocklin, the Eagles’ QB in the 1960 NFL Championship Game, got a second-place vote, the only top-three vote that didn’t go to McNabb, Foles or Cunningham.

Did we get it right? 
Sure. Say what you want about McNabb, like him or not, the guy won nine playoff games, reached five NFC Championship Games and got the Eagles to the playoffs in eight of the nine seasons that he was healthy enough to start at least 10 games. McNabb holds every franchise career passing record and won a franchise-record 92 games.

You can make a case for Foles based on his record-setting 2013 Pro Bowl season and 2017 Super Bowl run. He accomplished something no other quarterback has done since 1960 —win a championship. But Foles only started 32 regular-season games in an Eagles uniform, never more than 10 in a season. When it comes to contributions over a career, McNabb has to get the edge.

Complete team: 
QB: Donovan McNabb 

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The 10 worst quarterback performances in Eagles history

The 10 worst quarterback performances in Eagles history

In his final regular-season appearance in 2017, Nick Foles went 4-for-11 for 39 yards and an interception in a cameo against the Cowboys.

His 9.3 passer rating is second-lowest ever by an Eagles QB at the Linc. Foles was so bad that day before giving way to Nate Sudfeld — who went 19-for-23 for 134 yards — that some fans were screaming for Sudfeld to start in place of Foles in the playoffs.

You might remember he didn't. 

You might remember that Foles started and did OK.

Every quarterback has a bad game here and there. 

Every quarterback has a wretched game here and there.

Even Super Bowl MVPs.

We went through all 1,266 games the Eagles have played and found the 10 worst performances by a quarterback in franchise history. 

With apologies to Mike McMahon, Koy Detmer and Mike Boryla, here they are, listed in chronological order.

Tomorrow? The 10 best performances by a quarterback in franchise history! 

Packers 12, Eagles 10
Nov. 2, 1952, Marquette Stadium, Milwaukee
Bobby Thomason: 4-for-23, 49 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs

Thomason also had a zero TD, six-INT game against the Cards in 1956, so it was a tough call which performance to include. There’s something to be said for six INTs, but 4-for-23 is hard to top. Only seven QBs in NFL history have thrown as many as 23 passes in a game and completed just four. Thomason’s 3.4 passer rating is lowest in Eagles history by a QB throwing 20 or more passes.

Cardinals 41, Eagles 10
Oct. 2, 1966, Franklin Field
Norm Snead: 16-for-45, 247 yards, 0 TDs, 5 INTs, passer rating 15.0

One of only three performances in Eagles history where a QB had five or more INTs and no TD passes, and the lowest completion percentage of those three (36 percent).

Packers 30, Eagles 17
Oct. 25, 1970, County Stadium, Milwaukee 
Rick Arrington: 3-for-10, 16 yards, 0 TDs, 3 INTs, 0.0 passer rating

Arrington, a rookie, was making his first NFL start, but he didn’t last long before getting benched for Snead. This remains one of only eight games in NFL history where a QB threw 10 or more times for 16 or fewer yards with three or more INTs and no TDs. One of only two 0.00 passer ratings in Eagles history (minimum 10 attempts).

Cowboys 42, Eagles 7
Sept. 26, 1971, Veterans Stadium

Pete Liske: 11-for-29, 132 yards, 0 TDs, 6 INTs, 13.1 passer rating

Tough day for Liske. Not only did he complete just 38 percent of his passes, he threw six interceptions and no touchdowns. One of only seven performances in NFL history where a QB completed less than 40 percent of his passes with six or more interceptions and no TDs.

Cowboys 21, Eagles 10
Dec. 13, 1981, Texas Stadium
Ron Jaworski: 11-for-32, 140 yards, 0 TDs, 4 INTs, 9.4 passer rating

This remains the only performance in Eagles history where a QB completed less than 35 percent of his passes with no TDs and at least four interceptions.

Redskins 23, Eagles 0
Sept. 30, 1991, RFK Stadium
Pat Ryan: 4-for-14, 24 yards, 0 TDs, 3 INTs, 0.0 passer rating

After Jim McMahon hurt his knee, the Eagles were forced to use Ryan, the recently un-retired 36-year-old journeyman. Ryan went 4-for-14 for 24 yards and was intercepted three times, twice by Darrell Green and once by Cinnaminson’s Andre Collins. Ryan remains the only Eagles QB since 1951 with a 0.0 passer rating on more than 10 passes. It's the worst passing performance in Eagles history.

Buccaneers 14, Eagles 13
Oct. 6, 1991, Tampa Stadium
Brad Goebel: 9-for-20, 62 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs, 12.9 passer rating

Because of Ryan’s above performance and with Randall Cunningham and McMahon both out, Brad Goebel got his first NFL start. Imagine being an Eagles fan in 1991? One of the greatest defenses ever assembled and back-to-back QB performances among the worst in Eagles history! And the following week Goebel threw four INTs and no TDs (but had a higher passer rating). He’s the only Eagles quarterback in the last 40 years with back-to-back games with a passer rating under 30.

Cowboys 34, Eagles 0
Nov. 2, 1998, Veterans Stadium
Bobby Hoying: 13-for-39, 124 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs, 21.7 passer rating. 

Take your pick of Hoying's games in 1998. He only started seven games but is still the only Eagles QB in the last 50 years with five games in a season with a passer rating below 40. Worst of the bunch was this performance against the Cowboys. His 21.7 passer rating is lowest by an Eagles QB vs. the Cowboys in the last 39 years.

Ravens 36, Eagles 7
Nov. 23, 2008, M&T Bank Stadium, Baltimore
Donovan McNabb: 8-for-18, 59 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs, 13.2 passer rating
Kevin Kolb: 10-for-23, 73 yards, 0 TDs, 2 INTs, 15.3 passer rating

McNabb and Kolb were both so bad we’ve got to list them side-by-side. Andy Reid benched McNabb at halftime — the only time McNabb was ever benched as an Eagle. The Eagles only trailed 10-7, but the seven points came on a kickoff return and the offense was brutal. McNabb’s 13.2 passer rating was his second-worst in 101 games as an Eagle. Then Kolb came in, threw an NFL-record 107-yard INT return to Ed Reed and the game really got out of control. This is still the only time since 1975 two quarterbacks from the same team had a passer rating under 16 on at least 15 passes in the same game! 

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