Jacob Rhame

MLB suspends Mets pitcher Jacob Rhame 2 games for throwing at Rhys Hoskins

MLB suspends Mets pitcher Jacob Rhame 2 games for throwing at Rhys Hoskins

Major League Baseball has determined that Jacob Rhame's pitches at Rhys Hoskins' head were intentional. Rhame has been suspended two games, chief baseball officer Joe Torre announced Thursday.

In the span of six pitches Tuesday night, Rhame threw two high-90s pitches that sailed over Hoskins' head in the ninth inning of a 9-0 game. The Mets claimed it was accidental, as teams always do, but nobody on the Phillies' side believed it.

It was apparent retaliation for two Mets being hit by pitches in consecutive at-bats by two different Phillies pitchers the previous night. Jose Alvarez and Juan Nicasio clearly were not trying to hit either Met in a close game.

MLB's ruling comes a day after Hoskins got his revenge on Rhame with a ninth-inning home run and a trot around the bases that lasted more than 34 seconds (see story).

There is definite bad blood brewing between these teams, which is good for baseball. 

"That's what a rivalry is," Hoskins said Wednesday night.

The Phillies and Mets haven't both been positioned to contend in the same year for close to a decade. The teams don't meet again for two months but when they do, it will be interesting to see whether those feelings have lingered and if the Mets aim to send Hoskins another message.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies

Rhys Hoskins, Phillies get their retaliation against Mets in an even more satisfying way

Rhys Hoskins, Phillies get their retaliation against Mets in an even more satisfying way

NEW YORK — Roman Quinn's groin strain aside, the Phillies needed a night like this. 

They blanked the Mets, 6-0, Wednesday for their first shutout win of the season (see observations).

They finally cashed in with runners in scoring position to break the game open, something they failed to do for most of their 2-5 road trip through Colorado and New York.

They got a strong starting pitching performance from Vince Velasquez and solid work from four different relievers who took down an inning apiece.

And they had their dramatic moment late in the game when Rhys Hoskins exacted revenge on fringe major-league pitcher Jacob Rhame 24 hours after seeing two high-90s fastballs whiz past his head. Hoskins took Rhame deep to left field ... and then took his time strolling the bases.

Hoskins' trot around the bases needs to be seen in entirety to fully appreciate.

"Oh yeah, I enjoyed the moment," he said postgame. "I just enjoyed the moment. I think to put an exclamation point on a win like that when we really needed it, I think that's what everyone in here is most excited about."

The situation was reminiscent of Chase Utley vs. Jonathan Sanchez in San Francisco in the summer of 2009. Sanchez threw a ball over Utley's head, earned a glare from the stoic second baseman, and Utley homered a few pitches later.

"If a ball goes over your head the night before, the best way to get back at the pitcher is to put the ball in the seats," manager Gabe Kapler said. "I think it was worthy of Rhys having that moment and soaking it all in. He deserved that. He earned it."

Did Hoskins care that the Mets may take offense? Hoskins isn't one for one-word answers, but he was in this case.

"No," he said flatly.

Does he care that there seems to be some bad blood brewing between the Phillies and Mets?

"I think that's what a rivalry is," he said. "I think there's always going to be a little bit of bad blood in a rivalry."

The home run was Hoskins' seventh of the season. It gave the Phillies the last word in a series they lost, and it gives the Mets a little something to chew on during the two-month period before these teams meet again.

The Quinn injury was a sour subplot on an otherwise cathartic evening for the Phillies. He strained his groin legging out a perfectly executed safety squeeze, which enabled the Phillies to expand their lead in the eighth inning. The guy just can't catch a break. Injury after injury. On top of the 3-for-25 start to the season, which included 14 strikeouts.

"I ran out there and I just couldn't believe it," Kapler said of watching Quinn get hurt again. "He's worked so hard to get back. I really feel for Roman. It's nothing he's doing. His body's just not responding. We keep thinking about different ways we can keep him healthy and all he wants to do is get going and stay going. It's tough. I really want the best for Roman."

The Phillies over this last week dealt with injuries, flat offensive performances, a blown extra-inning lead with one strike remaining, an ejection to their best player and two near misses on beanballs. It all came without the respite of an off day. 

"This was a long, hard road trip," Kapler understated. 

Now the Phillies come back home to take on the Marlins for four games. Success against the Marlins may determine this tight NL East. The division has played out as expected through the season's first month. The Phillies, Mets, Braves and Nationals are separated by 1½ games and the Marlins are already 10 games under .500.

Between the Marlins series, an off-day Monday, two games with the offensively-challenged Tigers and another off-day, the Phillies have a chance to quickly put the frustrations of this road trip behind them. If they take care of the business they should take care of.

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies

Mets pick an incredibly lame moment to send Rhys Hoskins and Phillies a message

Mets pick an incredibly lame moment to send Rhys Hoskins and Phillies a message

NEW YORK — Two nights in a row, the Phillies have been outclassed by the Mets. Two nights in a row, there's been drama in an otherwise blah game.

The Phillies lost, 9-0, to Zack Wheeler and the Mets in the second game of the series (see observations), 24 hours after dropping a 5-1 decision that included a Bryce Harper ejection and a postgame message from Jake Arrieta to his teammates, through the media (see story).

On Tuesday, with two outs and nobody on in the ninth inning of a blowout, Mets reliever Jacob Rhame decided it was the appropriate time to send a message on behalf of his team after two Mets were hit by pitches the previous night.

The first pitch Rhame threw to Rhys Hoskins was a 96 mph fastball over his head. Hoskins was clearly annoyed by it, taking a few steps toward the mound as both benches slowly began to clear. After about 20 seconds, things cooled down and the at-bat continued.

Five pitches later, Rhame threw another fastball over Hoskins' head, this one at 97 mph, for ball four. Hoskins angrily slammed his bat and Mets catcher Travis d'Arnaud quickly stepped in front of him to create a barrier between Hoskins and the mound.

"Oh, he just said they were trying to go inside, and I laughed," Hoskins said.

Clearly intentional. Clearly a retaliatory attempt or message from the Mets a night after two consecutive Mets were unintentionally hit by pitches from Jose Alvarez and Juan Nicasio.

"He didn't miss up and in the rest of the inning, so I'll let you decide," Hoskins said after the game.

When asked if it was lame for a pitcher to choose the potential final at-bat of a blowout to throw at a batter, Hoskins tried to be as diplomatic as possible.

"I would think so," he said. "But I understand baseball. They got hit a couple of times yesterday."

This kind of situation comes up every once in a while across baseball, and hitters always say they understand the deal but that it's not cool to throw at a guy's head. Which it's not. Ever. Especially in the age of high-90s velocity.

"I don't get it," Bryce Harper said. "I understand that two of their guys got hit yesterday. But, I mean, if it's baseball and you're going to drill somebody, at least hit him in the ass. Not in the head. You throw 98, it's scary now. You could kill somebody. Lose your eyesight. That's bigger than the game."

Harper referenced the time Hunter Strickland hit him with a pitch to retaliate for the two home runs Harper hit off of him in the playoffs three years prior. It was a silly thing for Strickland to do, but at least it was in a safer spot.

"Strick hit me in the butt. I still went and got him," Harper said, referring to his charging the mound. "But, you know, I respected him for it because he hit me in the butt. I understand protecting your guys and two of their really good guys got hit yesterday. You never want to see your star players get hit. If you're going to throw at Rhys right there — I don't know if he did or not. I know he said, 'My bad.' Hopefully, he didn't. But if you're going to, just hit him in the butt."

One could theorize this may wake up a slumping Phillies offense. The same could have been said Monday of Harper's ejection, which did nothing but further deplete a Phils lineup missing two starters and its super-utilityman.

They'll have a chance Wednesday night to get back on track against the constantly hittable Jason Vargas, a soft-tossing lefty with a 9.58 ERA. If they can't, they'll come home totally demoralized from a road trip through Colorado and New York that included injuries and several silent offensive performances.

"We just haven't played good baseball these last couple of days," Hoskins said. "End of a long road trip. It's a big game tomorrow. We'll be excited to go back home, but we've got to take care of business tomorrow against these guys."

Click here to download the MyTeams App by NBC Sports! Receive comprehensive coverage of your teams and stream the Flyers, Sixers and Phillies games easily on your device.

More on the Phillies