Julian Edelman

Eagles' DeSean Jackson is taking Julian Edelman up on offer to educate each other

Eagles' DeSean Jackson is taking Julian Edelman up on offer to educate each other

Looks like DeSean Jackson is taking up Julian Edelman on his offer.

Edelman, who is Jewish, posted on social media Thursday that he hoped to arrange an educational exchange program where he took Jackson to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and Jackson took him to the National Museum of African American History and Culture, also in Washington.

"Afterwards, we grab some burgers and we have those uncomfortable conversations."

On Friday morning, Edelman tweeted that he had spoken to Jackson, and while he didn't specifically say they were planning to tour the two museums together, he did say they "plan to use our experiences to educate one another and grow together."

Jackson cited a fake Hitler quote in a series of social media posts earlier this week that the Eagles called "absolutely appalling" in a statement.

Edelman's paternal great grandfather, Harry Edelman, was a Polish Jew and emigrated to England, where he married an Irish woman. Edelman, the former Super Bowl MVP, wrote in his autobiography, "Relentless," that he had researched his ancestry to learn more about his Jewish background and has spoken often about experiencing a Jewish reawakening.

In the Eagles' statement, the team said it is "committed to continuing to have productive and meaningful conversations with DeSean, as well as all of our players and staff, in order to educate, learn, and grow."

It's safe to say Jackson was strongly encouraged by team officials to participate in that learning and growth process, and certainly it’s a positive sign that he accepted Edelman's offer.

Edelman, 34, is about six months older than Jackson and one of 13 active NFL players with more career receptions than Jackson. Edelman has 599 and Jackson has 598. Edelman was MVP of Super Bowl LIII after the 2019 season.

The two museums are both located in Washington's museum row, adjacent to the Washington Monument, about a quarter of a mile apart.

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Julian Edelman extends DeSean Jackson invite to Holocaust Museum for 'uncomfortable conversations'

Julian Edelman extends DeSean Jackson invite to Holocaust Museum for 'uncomfortable conversations'

New England Patriots wide receiver Julian Edelman shared a video to his social media reacting to the “ugly things” DeSean Jackson shared to his Instagram earlier in the week.

Edelman is in a unique position to respond to Jackson because he is of Jewish faith. He is pushing for hard conversations over cancel culture.

“I’ve got nothing but respect for [DeSean’s] game,” Edelman begins. “I know he said some ugly things, but I do see an opportunity to have a conversation. I’m proud of my Jewish heritage and for me it’s not just about religion. It’s about community and culture as well.”

Edelman points out he identified as Jewish later in life and was often the target of anti-Semitic hate on the football field.

“Anti-Semitism is one of the oldest forms of racism. It’s rooted in ignorance and fear. There’s no room for anti-Semitism in this world. Even though we’re talking about anti-Semitism, I don’t want to distract from how important the Black Lives Matter movement is and how we need to stay behind it. I think the Black and Jewish communities have a lot of similarities. One unfortunate similarity is that they’re both attacked by the ignorant and the hateful.”

“What we need to do is, we need to listen, we need to learn, and we need to act. We need to have those uncomfortable conversations if we’re going to have real change. So to that end, let’s do a deal: how about we go to D.C. and I take you to the Holocaust Museum and then you take me to the Museum of African American History and Culture. Afterwards, we grab some burgers and we have those uncomfortable conversations."

You can watch Edelman's full comments here.

Others connected to the Eagles organization also responded. Emmanuel Acho and Joe Banner added to the conversation.

Acho, who has been a standout media member speaking out for Black Lives Matter, said that "ignorance is no longer an excuse. It may be an explanation but it is no longer an excuse."

"I don't think DeSean Jackson meant  to offend anybody," Acho said. "I don't think he was knowledgeable about exactly what he was doing, but the problem is, he still did it and that is unacceptable."

Acho also pointed to being tired of the cancel culture in our country.

You can see Banner's comments from Thursday morning below.

Julian Edelman's touchdown pass on trick play spoils otherwise outstanding performance by Eagles' defense vs. Tom Brady

Julian Edelman's touchdown pass on trick play spoils otherwise outstanding performance by Eagles' defense vs. Tom Brady

The Eagles' defense managed to prevent Tom Brady from finding the end zone Sunday, but the play of the game was still a touchdown pass — it just happened to be thrown by Julian Edelman.

Edelman’s 15-yard third-quarter strike to fellow wide receiver Phillip Dorsett was not only the Patriots’ lone trip across the goal line. The trickery gave New England its first lead, and the team never looked back en route to a 17-10 win over the Eagles (see Roob's observations). 

“It was effective and ultimately was the difference in the game,” Rodney McLeod said. 

Edelman’s pass capped a 10-play, 84-yard scoring drive to open the second half, finally getting New England six points — eight with the two-point conversion — after their offense was forced to settle for a trio of field goals in the first half.

That play changed the complexion of the entire game.

“They went no huddle and came out with a trick play to score,” Fletcher Cox said. “That was that.”

Brady lateraled the ball to Edelman but the play was designed to look like a bubble screen. Instead of taking off for the first-down marker, the receiver dropped back and hit Dorsett streaking across the middle.

Rasul Douglas arrived late on the scene, but he was unable to jar the ball free to force the incompletion.

“They came out in the second half with a lot of tempo,” Malcolm Jenkins said. “We settled down and got them into (3rd-and-11), they throw a bubble to 11 — I think guys were just hustling to the ball thinking it was a screen, and it’s a double pass.

“Good play by them.”

The play marred an otherwise outstanding performance by the Eagles' defense, which limited Brady a 55.3 completion percentage and 4.6 yards per attempt.

Yet the Patriots have increasingly found ways to win games even when Brady doesn’t post gaudy numbers. This was the fourth game in the last 11 going back to New England’s Super Bowl victory over the Rams in which the future Hall of Famer didn’t throw a touchdown and his team was victorious.

“They don’t make too many mistakes so they wait 'til we make one,” Avonte Maddox said.

It’s also not the first time the Patriots have employed trickery, nor the first time Edelman has completed a pass or thrown a touchdown. Including postseason, Edelman is 5-for-6 for 141 yards and a touchdown.

“You can always say one guy should do this, one guy should do that,” Jalen Mills said. “It was just a good play and they did that at the right time.”

While the Eagles failed to threaten after jumping out to a 10-0 second-quarter lead, the defense was keeping the team in the game, going into the locker room with a 10-9 lead after several stands.

The Eagles held New England to 298 yards of total offense, 5-for-16 on third downs and 1-for-3 in the red zone — but the one turned out to be a backbreaker.

“If it takes trick plays to score on us, then so be it,” Cox said. 

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