Lane Johnson

Chris Long, Lane Johnson ring ceremonial Liberty Bell before Sixers-Raptors Game 6

Chris Long, Lane Johnson ring ceremonial Liberty Bell before Sixers-Raptors Game 6

Hungry dogs run faster?

Jason Kelce said it on the Art Museum steps back on Feb. 8, 2018, a day Philly sports fans will remember forever.

Thursday night, Chris Long and Lane Johnson wanted to spread that mentality to the Sixers.

Wearing the underdog masks, the two Eagles players rang the Sixers’ ceremonial Liberty Bell before Game 6 of the Sixers’ second-round playoff series against the Raptors.

Johnson remembers very clearly when most people counted the Eagles out after Carson Wentz’s season-ending knee injury.

The Raptors were favorites to beat the Sixers in this series, and the widespread assumption seems to be that they’ll move on.

Long and Johnson say, not so fast.

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Lane Johnson publicly squashes his beef with new Eagles teammate Zach Brown

Lane Johnson publicly squashes his beef with new Eagles teammate Zach Brown

No hard feelings. 

One of the first things a lot of fans thought when the Eagles signed linebacker Zach Brown was the brief feud between him and Lane Johnson before the 2017 season. 

That beef has now been publicly squashed. 

To refresh your memory, back before the 2017 season, Johnson penned a story for The Players Tribune and in it, had this passage about the Eagles’ Week 1 matchup against the Redskins, who had signed Brown that offseason: 

Let me tell you what’s going to happen in a couple of weeks. This team is going to go down to D.C. and whup some ass against the Redskins. We’re going to surprise some people.

That bit of Johnson’s article made its way down 95, to Brown and the Washington locker room, where it wasn’t received very well. This was the season after Johnson’s 10-game suspension for his second PED offense, so Brown was happy to take the low-hanging fruit. 

Not long after he tweeted that, NBC Sports Washington spoke to Brown, who said Johnson’s comments were “insulting.” Brown was in his first year with Washington and wanted to create a winning atmosphere, which is awfully hard to do if your opponents are saying they’re going to whup your ass. 

At the time, Brown said, “That’s the thing, he’s guaranteeing that win. So when that game comes, when that opening game comes, we’ll see what happens.” 

Well … the Eagles won that Week 1 matchup in Washington, 30-17, and then went on to win the first Super Bowl championship in franchise history as Johnson was named to the All-Pro team. Washington went 7-9, the same record it finished with in both of Brown’s two seasons there. 

Now, Brown is an Eagle. And it seems like the bad blood between these two won’t be an issue. 

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Lane Johnson throws shade at Donovan McNabb, who keeps getting under people's skin

Lane Johnson throws shade at Donovan McNabb, who keeps getting under people's skin

Updated: 8:53 a.m.

Turns out Lane Johnson is protective of Carson Wentz both on the field and on social media.

Donovan McNabb, who has become a professional annoying person since fading out of the NFL during the 2011 season, said in a radio interview with Zach Gelb of CBS Sports Radio on Saturday that the Eagles will need to start thinking about replacing Carson Wentz if the Eagles don’t reach an NFC Championship Game by next year.

Here’s Dave Zangaro’s story on that.

That didn’t go over too well with Johnson, the Eagles’ all-pro right tackle, who tweeted this on Easter Sunday: 

Ouch.

Later in the evening, Johnson went on 94WIP and explained the way he felt. 

This is what I meant — every training camp we have all of these ex-players come and shake our hands, wish us good luck. Then, they just go out and just talk hate. I feel there is a lot of envy, jealously, and I see a lot of fakery. It isn’t just me — a lot of other teammates see it too. You would think the best quarterback in franchise history would try to build up a young man that looks up to him instead of always criticizing him, critiquing him and wishing he would fail so he could be the missing link and feel better himself. That is what I don’t like.

McNabb’s post-Eagles career has been a train wreck. He won only six of 19 starts with the Redskins and Vikings before drifting out of the NFL at the relatively young age of 35. 

He worked briefly for NFL Network and ESPN before losing his ESPN job following allegations of sexual harassment when he worked at NFL Network, allegations he has denied. 

And he had DUI convictions in 2013 and 2015 and served an 18-day sentence along with a 72-day house arrest sentence after the second one.

And he keeps saying dumb stuff.

McNabb was a very good quarterback. But he can’t seem to get through an interview without saying something embarrassing, inappropriate or just plain dumb.

The issue isn’t whether the Eagles would need to replace Wentz in two years — of course they won’t, if he continues to play at a high level. And of course they will if he can’t stay healthy or struggles.

The issue is that it’s McNabb saying it. Which comes across petty and passive aggressive considering Wentz plays the same position for the same team that McNabb did for 11 years.

McNabb just has a way of getting under people's skin. It’s why Philadelphia never truly embraced him even though he took the Eagles to the playoffs eight times, won nine playoff games and made six Pro Bowls. 

This time it was Lane Johnson whose skin he got under. Next time it’ll be someone else. 

Some things never change. 

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