Non-Philadelphians are so confused by local foods it's actually hysterical

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USA Today Images/NBC Sports Philadelphia

Non-Philadelphians are so confused by local foods it's actually hysterical

Just the other day, we decided to post a graphic to our social media … little did we know we’d break everyone’s brain in the process. 

This isn’t even directed to the Philadelphia locals who had the impossible task of picking their their choices. Anyone from outside of the area? 

Absolutely zero clue what was going on. 

Like this guy who claimed water ice was … a slushy. The audacity

This elected official who doesn’t even know what pizza, fries and pretzels are. (We hope he’s kidding, too.)

Again. Does this guy really not know anything in this picture? No. 5 is a PRETZEL. A PRETZEL. 

This, “What is wrong with Philadelphia,” guy. 

Sir, if you only knew more about these wonderful creations — you’d know that there is truly nothing wrong with Philadelphia. Seriously, have a slice of Angelo’s and get back to me. 

I feel for the people who have never enjoyed a TastyKake, so much so that he’d call us all monsters. 

… I’m sorry, you think that is what

Listen, if loving butterscotch krimpets is wrong, then I don’t want to be right. 

It’s incredibly strange to see people this confused over items that are deemed staples in Philadelphia. Don’t even get me started on the guy who thought scrapple was banana bread. 

Now, the Philadelphians have been stressed out ever since, debating their top choices. Let me introduce the loophole I found so we can enjoy them all: 

 

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Temple football extends contract with Eagles to continue playing at Lincoln Financial Field

Temple football extends contract with Eagles to continue playing at Lincoln Financial Field

Temple, one of only four college football teams to play all its home games in an NFL stadium, extended its contract with the Eagles another five years on Monday.

Terms of the deal were not announced, but a story in the Temple News in 2016 reported that Temple University leased the Linc for $1 million per year but said school officials expected the price to increase to $3 million per year under terms of a new contract.

Temple, which has played its home games at the Linc since 2003, will continue to play at the Eagles' stadium through 2024, according to terms of a contract extension the Eagles announced.

The deal includes a five-year option, although a press release from the Eagles doesn't specify which party holds the option. Presumably, Temple officials can exercise the option through 2029 if efforts to build an on-campus stadium do not pan out over the next five years or get out of the deal with the Eagles after the 2024 season if they're able to get a stadium built.

Temple's original lease with the Eagles ran through 2017 but both sides agreed to extend it two years while Temple unsuccessfully explored building an on-campus stadium. That extension expired after the 2019 season, so until now the Owls did not officially have a home for their 2020 games.

The Owls play either six or seven home games per year. They have seven scheduled for 2020.

According to The Temple News, Temple does not receive any portion of parking revenue from its home football games but does get 10 percent of concessions. 

This contract extension was announced only about seven months before Temple's 2020 home opener, scheduled for Sept. 12 against Idaho.

Temple's average announced attendance in 2018, the last year the NCAA has data for, was 28,470. During the five-year span from 2014 through 2018 the Owls averaged 30,108 and ranked 75th out of 130 FBS programs.

Capacity at the Linc is 69,176, so the stadium has been about 44 percent full over the last five years for Temple football games.

The only other college football programs to play all their home games in an NFL stadium are Miami at the Dolphins' Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens; Pitt at the Steelers' Heinz Field in Pittsburgh; and South Florida at the Buccaneers' Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

Temple is 54-46 at the Linc since it opened in 2003 and 24-8 over the last five years. The Owls have played in a bowl game in each of the last five years.

"We are pleased to extend our agreement with Temple University," Eagles president Don Smolenski said in a statement. "We have enjoyed a great relationship for the past 17 seasons, as our staffs have worked together to make Lincoln Financial Field the home for Temple football. We look forward to continuing that tradition into the future."

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Good or bad, Malcolm Jenkins knows Lincoln Financial Field will be loud Sunday

Good or bad, Malcolm Jenkins knows Lincoln Financial Field will be loud Sunday

Malcolm Jenkins knows it’s going to be loud at Lincoln Financial Field on Sunday. 

One way or the other. 

It’s going to be whatever we make it. We show up and lay an egg, it’ll be the loudest boos we’ve heard since I’ve been here. We show up and play some ball and I think it’ll be rocking.

He’s right. 

The Eagles are hosting the Cowboys for, all intents and purposes, a game that will decide the winner of the NFC East. Two bitter rivals in a do-or-die situation. Despite the fact that both teams have been disappointments this season, the Linc will be loud on Sunday and there’s still a ton on the line. 

The home fans will be ready for the 4:25 p.m. kickoff and will bring the juice early. What happens with the crowd after that will be up to the Eagles. 

It seems like this season they’ve been cheered and booed equally — and rightfully so. 

But if the Eagles can keep their fans in this game, it might make a difference. 

“I think that's probably the first thing, is crowd noise always makes it difficult for opposing offenses to communicate,” defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz said. “They do a lot of checks at the line of scrimmage and things like that.

“But I think it's more than just that. It's more than the noise affecting the game. I do think that our players feed off of the energy of the crowd and in a big game like this, it will be a playoff atmosphere. Our guys know the stakes of this game and I'm sure our fans do, too. They'll know what time it is.”

This season, the Eagles have given up 125 points at home (17.9) and 203 on the road (29.0).

And since Schwartz became defensive coordinator in 2016, the Eagles are giving up an average of 16.8 points per game at home and 25.2 points on the road. 

It really does seem to matter. 

“We get to wake up at the hotel here and get to play at our home field at Lincoln Financial (Field),” Fletcher Cox said. “It’s an advantage for us. We know the fans will be really loud. We know what the game means for us. We know what this city deserves. We just gotta go out and play our best football.”

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